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Full text of "Mississippi Southern College Bulletin, General Catalogue Issue 1948-1949"

i?.Q 




BULLETIN OF 

Mississippi Southern 
College 



VOLUME 35 



APRIL 1, 1948 



NUMBER 1 



GENERAL 

CATALOGUE 

ISSUE 

Announcements for 1948-1949 
Register for 1946-1947 




Published Quarterly By The 

MISSISSIPPI SOUTHERN COLLEGE 

HATTIESBURG, MISSISSIPPI 



VOLUME 35 NUMBER 1 



Mississippi Southern College 

Hattiesburg, Mississippi 



Member 

of the 

American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education 

American Council on Education 

Association of American Colleges 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Mississippi Association of Colleges 

National Association of Schools of Music 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1948-1949 

3g« SjS !gS S$C 

FALL QUARTER OPENS SEPTEMBER 13, 1948 



Published quarterly by the Mississippi Southern College, Hattiesburg, 

Mississippi. Entered as second-class matter February 19, 1917, 

at the Post Office at Hattiesburg, Mississippi, under Act of 

August 24, 1912. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/mississippisouthv35n4miss 



CALENDAR FOR 1948-49 





SEPTEMBER 








MARCH 










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APRIL 










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JUNE 






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DECEMBER 

12 3 

7 8 9 10 

14 15 16 17 


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JANUARY 


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JULY 


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AUGUST 






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BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Of the Institutions of Higher Learning, State of Mississippi 



With terms expiring May 7, 1956 

J. OLIVER EMMERICH, Seventh Congressional District McComb 

R. N. HENLEY, First Congressional District Macon 

DR. H. M. IVY, State-at-Large Meridian 

MARTIN V. B. MILLER, President, Fifth Congressional District 

Meridian 

With terms expiring May 7, 1952 
MRS. HAZEL PERRY LEE, Fourth Congressional District—. Eupora 

H. G. CARPENTER, Third Congressional District Rolling Fork 

R. W. REED, Northern Supreme Court District Tupelo 

R. B. SMITH, Jr., Second Congressional District Ripley 

With terms expiring February 22, 1948 

RANSOM E. ALDRICH Michigan City 

JOHN W. SAVAGE , Gulfport 

MAJOR W. CALVIN WELLS Jackson 

With terms expiring May 7, 1948 

JOHN W. BACKSTROM, Sixth Congressional District Leakesville 

MEANS JOHNSTON, State-at-Large Greenwood 

REECE D. McLENDON, Southern Supreme Court District 

" Poplarville 

MRS. JANIE RICE TAYLOR, Central Supreme Court District 

Jackson 

PAUL H. BOWDRE, LaBauve Trustee (DeSoto County). .....Hernando 

E. R. JOBE, Executive Secretary Jackson 



General Calendar 



GENERAL CALENDAR 

Faculty meetings will be held at 7:00 P. M. on the fourth Tuesday 
of October, November, January, February, March, and April. 

FALL QUARTER— 1948-1949 

Sunday, September 12 

12:00 Noon Dormitories open for freshmen 

Monday, September 13 

9:00 A. M. Placement tests for freshmen 

Dormitories open for transfer students 

8:30 A. M. Demonstration School opens 

1:00 P. M. Convocation for new students 
(freshmen and transfers) 

2:00 P. M. Explanation of curricula and 
registration procedure 

5:45 P. M. Buffet supper and Christian Federation 
program 

8:00 P. M. Church parties 

Tuesday, September 14 

Registration of former students 

8:00 to 10:00 A. M. Seniors 

10:00 to 12:00 Noon Juniors 

1:00 to 4:00 P. M. Sophomores 

Orientation program for freshmen, new students and trans- 
fers 

8:00 A. M. Psychological tests 

9:00 A. M. Separate convocation for men 
and women with deans of stu- 
dents 

10:30 A. M. Student Government program 

1:00 P. M. Orientation (group rotation) 
Use of the library 
Study of handbook 
How to study 
Geographic orientation 

Wednesday, September 15 

Registration for freshmen, new students, and transfers 

8:00 to 10:00 A. M. A to G 

10:00 to 12:00 Noon H to O 

1:00 to 3:00 P. M. P to Z 

6 



General Calendar 



Thursday, September 16 

8:00 A. M. All classes meet on a forty -five minute 
schedule 

11:00 A. M. Special assembly 

Saturday, October 17 — Homecoming 

Friday, October 22 — Mid-term 

Sunday, November 7 to Sunday, November 14 — Pan Hellenic Week 

Wednesday, November 24 

4:15 P. M. Thanksgiving Holidays begin 

Monday, November 29 

8:00 A. M. Class work resumed 

Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, December 1, 2, and 3 

Fall Quarter examinations and records 
Faculty reports must be in the Registrar's 
office by 4:00 P. M., December 3 

WINTER QUARTER— 1948-1949 

Monday, December 6 

8:00 A. M. Registration for Winter Quarter 
Sunday, December 12 

8:15 P. M. Annual presentation of "The Messiah" 

Thursday, December 16 

6:00 P. M. Annual formal Christmas dinner 

Friday, December 17 

4:15 P. M. Christmas Holidays begin 

Sunday, January 2 

12:00 Noon Dormitories open 

Monday, January 3 

8:00 A. M. Class work resumed 

Monday, January 31 

Beginning of second term of Winter Quarter 

Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, March 9, 10, and 11 

Winter Quarter examinations and records 



Faculty reports must be in the Registrar's 
office by 4:00 P. M., March 11 



General Calendar 



SPRING QUARTER— 1948-1949 

Monday, March 14 

8:00 A. M. Registration for Spring Quarter 
Thursday, April 14 

4:15 P. M. Easter Holidays begin 

Monday, April 18 

8:00 A. M. Class work resumed 

Sunday to Thursday, April 10 to April 14 — Religious Emphasis Week 

Monday, April 25 — Second term of the Spring Quarter begins 

Sunday March 1 to Sunday March 8 — Choir Trip 

Friday, May 27 — Senior Examinations 

8:00 P. M. Graduation exercises for the Demonstration 
School 

Sunday, May 29 

11:00 A. M. Baccalaureate Sermon 

Monday, May 30 

10:00 A. M. Class Day exercises 

8:00 P. M. Graduation exercises 

Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, June 1, 2, and 3 

Spring Quarter examinations and records 

Faculty reports must be in the Registrar's 
office by 4:00 P. M., June 3 

SUMMER QUARTER— 1948-1949 

Monday and Tuesday, June 6 and 7 — Registration for Summer Quarter 

Wednesday, June 8 — All classes meet on regular schedule 

Friday, July 15 — Mid-term 

Monday, July 18 — Registration for second term of Summer Quarter 

Friday, August 12 — Senior examinations 

Monday, August 15 

8:00 P. M. Graduation exercises 

Tuesday and Wednesday, August 16 and 17 

Examinations and records. August 16, final 
examinations. August 17, faculty reports 
must be in Registrar's office by 4:00 P. M. 

Classes during second term of Summer Quarter meet five days 
per week. 



Administrative Officers 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

R. C. Cook, B.S., M.A., Ed.D. 

President and Director of Summer Quarter 

R. A. McLemore, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Dean of the College 

Mary Pulley, B.S Registrar 

C. 0. Smalling, B.S Financial Secretary 

Lena Y. Gough, B.S., M.A Dean of Women 

Roswell G. Lowrey, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Dean of Men 

Anna M. Roberts, B.A., M.A., B.S. in L.S Librarian 

Oscar N. Darby, B.S., M.A Alumni Secretary 

HEADS OF DIVISIONS 

J. Fred Walker, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Biological Science 

Clarence C. Dawson, B.S., M.A. 

Acting Head of Commerce and Business - 

Roy G. Bigelow, B.A., M.A., Ph.D..... Education and Practice Teaching 

R. G. Lowrey, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Health and Physical Education 

Bertha M. Fritzsche, B.S., M.S - Home Economics 

Orville Thomas, B.S Industrial Arts 

Wilbur W. Stout, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Language and Literature 

Frank E. Marsh, Jr., Mus.B., M.A Music and Fine Arts 

Oliver V. Austin, B.A., M.A Science and Mathematics 

Leon A. Wilber, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Acting Head of Social Studies 

Emerson E. Hall, B.Ed., M.S., Ph.D Extension and School Service 

William H. Sumrall, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Graduate Studies 

Harry Thomas, B.S Director of Veterans Advisement Center 



Faculty 

FACULTY 

Robert Cecil Cook, B.S., M.A., Ed.D. President 

B.S., Mississippi State College, 1924 ; M.A., Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1933 ; Ed.D., ibid., 1942. 

0. B. Ader, A.B., A.M., Ph.D Asst. Professor of Mathematics 

A.B'., Duke University, 1926; A.M., ibid., 1928; Ph.D., University 
of Kentucky, 1937. 

Oliver V. Austin, B.A., M.A. Head of Div. of Physical Science 

Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., University of Mississippi 1911 ; M.A., ibid., 1912 ; .graduate 

student, University of Illinois, 192'0 ; graduate student, University 

of Chicago, 1929-30. 

Mary Poe Baylis, A. B., Mus.B Associate Professor of Piano 

A.B., Davenport College, Lenoir, N. C, 192"2 ; B.M., New York School 
of Music and Arts, 1924 ; Student of Arthur Friedheim, Dr. William 
Berwald, Harry Vibbard, Silvio Scionti, Edward Collins) Leo Sowerby. 

Albert S. Benham, A.B., M.S Acting Asst. Prof, of Chemistry 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1908; M.S., ibid., 1926. 

Rog G. Bigelow, B.S. Ed., M.A., Ph.D...._Head of Division of Education 

and Psychology, Director of Workshops, 
Professor of Education 

B.S. Ed., Central Missouri State College, 1920; M.A., University of 

Missouri, 1926 ; Ph.D., George Peabody College, 1939 ; independent 

study in Business and Public Administration, 1940-41, guided by 

Vanderbilt University. 

Martin L. Blackwelder, B.S. Ed., M.M.____Associate Professor of Voice, 

Head of Vocal Music Department 

B.S. Ed., State Teachers College, Maryville, Mo., 1929; M.M., 
Northwestern University, 1947. 

Willa Bolton, B.A., M.A. Professor of Geography 

A.B'., Mississippi State College for Women, 1899 ; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1922 ; graduate student, Clark University, 1931. 

Polly Brady, A.B., B.M Instructor of Piano 

A.B., Cadek Conservatory of the University of Chattanooga, 
Tennessee, 1945 ; Mus.B'., ibid., 1947. Piano study with Roy Lamont 
Smith, Harold Cadek, LeRoy Anspach. Theory with Arthur Pettner. 

Ernest Q. Campbell, A.B., M.A Instructor of Sociology 

A.B., Furman University, 1945 ; M.M., University of Pennsylvania, 
1946 ; study at Temple University, 1946. 

Pearl Campbell, B.S., M.S. Instructor of Home Economics 

B.S., Mississippi State College for Women, 1914; M.S., Iowa State 
College, 1932. 

Mary F. Cogdell, A.B., M.S Director of Public Relations 

Instructor of Journalism 

A.B., Birmingham-Southern College, 1942 ; M.S., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1945. 

Nan Cooper, B.S. Critic Teacher, Commerce 

B.S., Mississippi State College, 1939. 

O. N. Darby, B.S., M.A Alumni Secretary 

Assistant Professor of English 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1926 ; M.A., University of 

Michigan, 1932 ; graduate student, University of Alabama, 1939 ; 

Peabody College, 1946. 

10 



Faculty 



Marie Davis, B.A., M.A. Critic Teacher, Social Studies 

B.A., Mississippi State College for Women, 1926 ; M.A., University of 
Michigan, 1941. 

C. C. Dawson, B.S., M.A. Acting Head of Div. of Commerce 

Professor of Economics and Business Administration 

B.S., University of Kentucky, 1927 ; M.A., George Peabody College, 
1931 ; graduate student, George Peabody College, 1931, 1933 ; graduate 
student, New York University, 1937, 1938 ; graduate student, Ohio 
State University; graduate student. University of Kentucky, 1943. 
1946, 1947. 

Forrest DeLano, Mus.B Associate Professor of Voice 

Mus.B., Knox Conservatory of Music, Galesburg, 111., 1928 ; graduate 
student, American Conservatory of Music, Chicago, 111. ; student of 
Cardon V. Burnham, Margaret Lawson Mulford, Jane Peterson, 
Phillip-Manuel, Theodore Harrison, Dr. Winter Thompson, Arthur 
Hackett, Blair McCloskey. 

Pattie S. Dowell, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Associate Professor of 

Elementary Education 

B.S., George Peabody College, 1927 ; M.S., North Carolina State of 

University of North Carolina, Raleigh, N. C, 1930 ; Ed.D., New York 

University, 1945 ; summer study at Columbia University. 

Annie Louise D'Olive, B.S., M.A. Assistant Professor of Art 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1927 ; M.A., Teachers College, 

Columbia University, 1934 ; graduate student, Dixie Art Colony, 

1941 ; Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. 

Jean Eason, B.M Asst. Professor of Theory, Piano and Harp 

Mus.B'., Oberlin Conservatory of Music, 1945 ; Harp study with Lucy 

Lewis, Carlos Salzedo, Alice Chalifoux ; Piano with Frances Hall, 

Beryl Ladd ; Theory with Dr. Victor Lytle. 

George R. Flexman, B.M Asst. Professor 'Cello, 

Ensemble and Theory 

Mus.B., Oberlin Conservatory of Music, 1S47. Student of John 
Frazer ('Cello) and Dr. Victor V. Lytle (Theory). 

Katherine S. Foote, B.A., B.S., M.S. Critic Teacher, Mathematics 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1912 ; B.S., Mississippi Southern College, 
1931 ; M.S., Louisiana State University, 1932'. 

Minnie B. Ford, B.S., M.A. Critic Teacher, Fifth Grade 

B.S., George Peabody College, 1930 ; M.A., ibid., 1932 ; graduate 
student, 1932. 

John M. Frazier, B.S., M.A. Director of General Education Board 

Health Project, Associate Prof, of Science, and Curator 
of the Museum 

B.S., George Peabody College, 1927; M.A., ibid., 1929; graduate stu- 
dent, University of Chicago, 1933. 

Thomas H. Freeny, B.S., M.A. Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Mississippi College, 1900 ; M.A., ibid., 1901 ; M.A., George 
Peabody College, 1928 ; graduate student, summer quarter 1930, 1931, 

1935. 

*Bertha M. Fritzsche, B.S., M.S Head of Div. of Home Economics 

Professor of Home Economics 

E'.S., Iowa State College, 1922 ; M.S., ibid., 1929 ; graduate student. 

Teachers College, Columbia University, 1933 ; University of Chicago, 

1941 ; Ohio State University, 1947. 

Anna E. George, Mus.B., Mus.M. Honorary Inst, of Music 

Three years study, Paris and London ; student of Madame Julie 

Rive-Kine, Edgar A. Brazelton, Paul Corder, Emil Schwartz, Rosetter 

Cole, Grace Potter Carrall, Irwin Fischer. 

* Absent on leave for study, 1947-48 session. 

11 



Faculty 



Altra Howse Gill, B.S., M.S Instructor of Home Economics 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1942 ; study on Master's Degree, 
University of Tennessee. 

John Edmond Gonzales, B.S., M.A. Instructor of History 

B.S., Louisiana State University, 1943 ; M.A., Louisiana State 
University, 1945. 

Lena Y. Gough, A.B., M.A. Dean of Women 

Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Alabama College, 1928 ; M.A., George Peabody College for 
Teachers, 1938. 

Billie Ruth Granberry, B.S Critic Teacher, Physical Education 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1947. 

Reginald A. Gray., Jr., B.A., LL.B Instructor of Commerce 

B.A., University of Mississippi, 1942; LL.B., ibid., 1946. 

Reed Green, B.S. Head Football Coach 

Director of Athletics 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1934. 

Deane Griffis, B.S. Critic Teacher, English 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1937 ; graduate student, Tulane 
University, 1940, 1941. 

Edward Emerson Hall, B.Ed., M.S., Ph.D Director of Extension 

and School Service 

Director of Placement Bureau 

Professor of Geography 

B.Ed., Southern Illinois Normal University. 1929 ; M.S., University 

of Michigan, 1932 ; Ph.D., George Peabody College for Teachers, 

1939 ; Postgraduate student, Furman University, 1941. 

William B. Harlan, B.S., M.A. Asst. Professor of Commerce 

B.S., Western Kentucky State Teachers College, 1935; M.A., George 
Peabody College, 1946. 

Mary Sloan Hawkins, B.A., B.S., M.A. Instructor of English 

B.A., Mississippi Synodical College, 1911 ; B.S., Mississippi Southern 
College, 1934 ; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1935. 

Willie D. Hearst, B.S., A.B., M.A Part-Time Asst. Professor of 

Biological Science 

B. S., Whitworth College, 1920 ; A.B., Mississippi Woman's College, 
1926; M.A., Tulane University, 1931. 

Alma Hickman, B.A., Ph.B., M.A. Professor of English 

B.A., Mississippi State College for Women, 1912 ; Ph.B., University 

of Chicago, 1918 ; M.A., Columbia University, 1924 ; graduate student 

University of Southern California, 1932 ; graduate student, 

University of Colorado, 1942 

Betty Jean Hill, B.M., M.M.~_ Asst. Professor of Voice and Musicology 

Mus.B\, Mississippi State College for Women, 1945 ; Mus.M., Univer- 
sity of Michigan, 1947. Student of Arthur Hackett. Summer study 
with Madame Cora Sapin and Theresa Schnabel, 1944. Vocal Liter- 
ature with Conrad Bos at Juilliard School of Music. 

Laura May Hill, B.S., M.A Asst. Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., George Peabody College, 1917; M.A., ibid., 1925; study at 

Harvard University, New York University, and Eastern School of 

Therapy. 

Edith Hinton, B.A., M.A. Critic Teacher, First Grade 

B.A., Mississippi State College for Women, 1931 ; M.A., Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1945. 

12 



Faculty 



Frank M. Hruby, Jr., Mus.B., Mus.M. Associate Professor of 

Piano, Theory, and Composition 

Mus.B., Eastman School of Music, 1940 ; Mus.M., 1941. Student of 
Cecile Genhart (Piano) ; Howard Hansen, Edward Royce, and 
Bernard Rogers (Composition and Orchestration) ; Irvine McHose, 
Arthur Shepherd, Gustave Soderlund (Theory). Compositions per- 
formed in orchestral and chamber music concerts in New York, 
Cleveland, Rochester, and Philadelphia. 

Joseph Huck, B.M., M.M Associate Professor of Piano, 

Head of Piano Department 

B.M., American Conservatory, 1936 ; M.M., ibid., 1940. Private piano 

tutelage under Andre Skalski, Leroy Campbell, Rudolph Reuter, 

Allen Spencer. 

George G. Hurst, B.S. Instructor of Chemistry 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1939. 

Farley K. Hutchins, Mus.B., M.Sac. Mus. Associate Professor 

of Organ, Piano, and Musicology 

Mus.F., Lawrence College Conservatory of Music, 1940 ; M.Sac. Mus., 
School of Sacred Music, Union Theological Seminary, New York, 
1946 ; Organ study with LaVahn Maesch, Dr. Clarence Dickinson 
and Carl Weinrich ; student of Gladys Ives Bainard (Piano) ; Cyrus 
Daniel (Theory) ; T. Tertius Noble, Harold Freidell and Normand 
Lockwood (Composition). Former Minister of Music, Fort Wash- 
ington Presbyterian Church, New York City. 

Harriet Jackson, B.A., M.A. _„ Asst. Professor of Foreign Language 

B.A., University of Mississippi, 1924 ; M.A., ibid., 1936 ; graduate stu- 
dent, L'Institut De Tours, 1938 ; graduate student, University 
Nacional (Mexico), 1941 

Willery Jackson, B.A., M.A. Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Mississippi State College for Women, 1921 ; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1926 ; graduate student, Columbia University, 1931-33. 

Netta M. Jenkins, B.S. Instructor in English 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1932 ; graduate student, Univer- 
sity of Mississippi, 1938, 1939. 

Marion C. Johnson, B.S. Critic Teacher & Athletic Coach 

at Demonstration School 

E'.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1941 ; graduate student, Louisiana 
State University, 1946. 

W. L. Johnson, B.A., M.A. Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., University of Tennessee, 1929 ; M.A., ibid., 1930 ; graduate 

student, summer quarters, Duke University, 1935, 1938 ; Texas 

University, 1936-1937; California University, 1939. 

Ayrlene McGahey Jones, B.A., M.A Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A., Millsaps College, 1935 ; M.A., University of Texas, 1947. 

Emily Peyton Jones, B.S., M.A. Professor of Education 

B.S., George Peabody College, 1918 ; M.A., Teachers College, 

Columbia University, 1924 ; graduate student, 1936 ; University of 

Southern California, 1937. 

John Jones, Jr., B.S., M.A. Instructor of Physical Science 

and Mathematics 

B.S., George Peabody College, 1940; M.A., ibid, 1946. 

Johnsie Kell, B.S., M.A. Critic Teacher, Fourth Grade 

B.S., Mississippi State College for Women, 1938 ; M.A., Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1943. 

13 



Faculty 



John M. King, B.S., M.A. Assistant Principal 

and Critic Teacher, Science 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1928 ; M.A., University of 

Mississippi 1933 ; graduate student, George Peabody College, Colorado 

State College of Education. 

Norvin L. Landskov, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Associate Professor 

of Education 
Director of Student Teaching 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 192'6 ; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1934 ; 
Ph.D., ibid., 1946. 

Pearl Reynolds Leech, B.A., M.A. Critic Teacher, Third Grade 

B.A., University of Mississippi, 1938 ; M.A., George Peabody College, 

1945. 

Walter J. Lok, B.Des., M.Des Asst. Professor of Fine Arts 

Head of Art Department 

B.Des., University of Michigan, 1943 ; M.Des., ibid., 1947. 

R. G. Lowrey, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. Head of Div. of Health 

and Physical Education 

Dean of Men 

Professor of Health Education 

B.S., Mississippi College, 1918 ; M.A., George Peabody College for 
Teachers, 1922; Ph.D., ibid., 1927. 

Mary Jo Magee, B.A., B.S. in L.S. Assistant Librarian 

B.A., Lousiana Polytechnic Institute, 1943 ; B.S. in L.S., George 
Peabody College for Teachers, 1946. 

Frank Earl Marsh, Jr., Mus.B., M.A. Head of Div. of Fine Arts 

Professor of Music 

Mus.B., New England Conservatory of Music, 1916 ; M.A., Syracuse 
University, 1926 ; student of Senor Alberto Jones, Dr. Adolf Frey, 
Kurt Fischer, Ethel Newcomb, Arthur Newstead, George W. 
Chadwick, F. Stuart Mason, Dr. William Berwald, Dr. Frank Sill 
Rogers. 

Helen Janet McDonald, Mus.B. Assistant Professor of Violin 

and Music Education 

Mus.B., Chicago Musical College, 1932 ; graduate student University 
of Michigan, 1944 ; Chicago Musical College, 1946 ; student of Leon 
Sametirli, Paul Stassevitch, Gilbert Ross (Violin) ; Gustave Dunkel- 
berger, Wesley LaViolette, Max Wald, (Theory) ; David Mattern, 
Roxy Cowan, Rose Marie Grentzer, John C. Kendall (Music 
Education); Rudolph Ganz, Hans Rosenwald (Music Literature). 

Frances McEvilly, B.S., M.S Asst. Professor of Home Economics, 

Director, School Lunch Education 

B.S., University of Alabama, 1933 ; M.S., ibid., 1947. 

James E. McKee, B.S. Ed., M.A Asst. Professor of Education 

Director of Guidance Clinic 

B.S. Ed., Teachers College, Indiana, Penn., 1941 ; M.A. in Guidance, 
Teachers College of Columbia University, 1946 ; study toward Ph.D., 

ibid. 

R. A. McLemore, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.- Dean of College, 

Professor of History 

B.A., Mississippi College, 1923 ; M.A., George Peabody College for 
Teachers, 1926 ; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1933. 

Sallie Stevens McLemore, B.S., M.A. Critic Teacher, Sixth Grade 

B.S., George Peabody College, 192*6 ; M.A., George Peabody College, 
1931 ; graduate student, University of California, 1944. 

14 



Faculty 



Dona Evelyn McNeese, B.S. Instructor of Commerce 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1943 ; Columbia University, 1947. 

Carlton L. McQuagge, B.S. Principal at Demonstration School 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1932 ; graduate student, 
University of Alabama, 1941 ; M.A., University of Mississippi, 1947. 

J. L. Milam, B.A., M.A Instructor of Health 

and Physical Education 

B.A., Louisiana Institute of Technology, 1936 ; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1940 ; study towards doctorate, ibid., 1940. 

W. J. Moody, B.S., M.S. Acting Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Mississippi State College, 1919 ; M.S., Emory University, 1927. 

John H. Napier, Jr., B.S., M.A., Ph.D. __Visiting Professor of Education 

B.S., Mississippi State College, 1920 ; M.A., University of California, 
1925 ; Ph.D., Stanford University, 1927. 

Florence B. Newman, B.S., M.A. Assistant Professor of 

Home Economics 

B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1916; M.A., University of Tulsa, 1943. 

Melvin G. Nydegger, B.S., M.A. Director of Institute of 

Latin American Studies 
Assistant Professor of Modern Languages 

E'.S., Kansas State Teachers College, 1927 ; M.A., University of 

Wisconsin, 1937 ; graduate study, National University of Colombia, 

S. A., 1939. 

Douglass Olsen, B.A., M.A. Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., University of Mississippi, 1919 ; M.A., Columbia University, 
1930 ; graduate student, Washington University, 1935. 

Fannie Owings, B.S., M.S. Asst. Professor of Heme Economics 

Critic Teacher 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1928; M.S., University of 
Tennessee, 1935. 

John T. Palmer, B.S., M.A Instructor in English 

E'.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1943 ; M.A., Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1946. 

Mrs. Tula B. Pellettieri, B.S., M.A Acting Librarian of 

Demonstration School 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1926 ; M.A., George Peabody 
College, 1929 ; graduate study, ibid., 1930, 1931. 

Roy A. Pulliam, B.S., M.A Professor of Elementary Education 

Director of Reading Clinic 

B.S., Union University, Jackson, Tenn., 1932 ; M.A., George Peabody 
College, 1939 ; graduate student, George Peabody College, 1942-43. 

Pauline Rawlings, B.S. Ed., M.S. Ed Instructor of Commerce 

B.S. Ed., Indiana State Teachers College (Terre Haute), 1930; 
M.S. Ed., Indiana University, 1943. 

Samuel T. bobbins, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Assistant Professor of 

Physical Education 

Diploma Savage School of Physical Education, 1925 ; B.S., New York 

University, 1942 ; M.A., ibid., 1943 ; Ed.D., ibid., 1947 (Pending 

oral examination). 

Anna M. Roberts, B.A., M.A., B.S. in L.S. Librarian 

Professor of Library Science 

B.A., Vanderbilt University, 1920 ; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 
1922 ; B.S. in L.S., University of Illinois Library School, 1933 ; 
graduate student University of Chicago Graduate Library School, 

1938. 

15 



Faculty 



H. William Rodemann, B.S., M.A. , Assistant Professor of 

History and Sociology 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1939 ; M.A., Oberlin College, 1946. 

Dixie Rowland, B.S Critic Teacher, Second Grade 

B.S., University of Alabama, 1940. 

Gilbert T. Saetre, B.S. Mus.Ed., M.A. Mus.Ed Associate Professor 

of Wind Instruments and 

Instrumental Music Education 

Director of the College Band 

B.S. Mus.Ed., New York University, 1930 ; M.A. Mus.Ed., ibid., 1940 ; 
graduate study in higher education, ibid., 1945. 

Marion Schleifer, Ph.B., M.A Instructor in Speech and Dramatics 

Ph.B., Marquette University, 1945 ; M.A., Northwestern University, 
1946 ; additional study, ibid., 1947. 

Hubert A. Shands, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. Professor of English 

Professor of Foreign Language 

A.B., University of Mississippi, 1890 ; A.M., ibid., 1891 ; Ph.D., ibid., 
1893 ; Ph.D., University of Halle-Wittenberg, Germany, 1902 

Betty Jean Simmons, B.S :Acting Instructor of Biology 

B.S., Mississippi State College for Women, 1946. 

Susan Smylie, A.B Acting Critic Teacher in Latin 

A.B., Mississippi State College for Women, 1906 ; further study at 
George Peabody College. 

W. F. St. Clair, B.S., M.A. Instructor of Physical Science 

B.S., University of Florida, 1937 ; M.A., University of Alabama, 1940. 

0. C. Steede, B.S., M.A. Instructor in Extension 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1929 ; M.A., George Peabody 
College, 1939 ; graduate student, George Peabody College, 1946. 

J. D. Stonestreet, B.S Assistant Coach 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1936. 

Wilbur W. Stout, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Head of Div. of Language 

and Literature, Professor of English 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 1921 ; M.A., ibid., 1922 ; Ph.D., 
ibid., 1926. 

William Herbert Sumrall, B.S., B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Head of Graduate Studies 

Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Clarke College, 1915 ; B.A., Mississippi College, 1924 ; M.A., 
ibid., 1925 ; Ph.D., Indiana University, 1929. 

James R. Switzer, B.S. Instructor of Physical Education for Men 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1941 ; graduate student, Louisiana 
State University, 1946. 

Ernestine Thomae, A.B., M.A. Assistant Professor of English 

and Modern Languages 

A.B., Mississippi State College for Women, 1914 ; M.A., George 
Peabody College, 1926 ; graduate student, George Peabody College, 

1930. 

Orville Thomas, B.S. Instructor of Industrial Arts 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1937 ; graduate student, University 
of Alabama, 1946. 

16 



Faculty 



Amelia Thompson, B.S., M.S Acting Head of Home 

Economics Department 
Asst. Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., Judson College, 1916; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1938. 

Sam B. Tidwell, B.S., M.A Asst. Professor of Accounting 

B'.S. in Higher Acct., Bowling Green College of Commerce, 1942 ; 

M.A., Business Education Dept., George Peabody College for Teachers, 

1947. 

Thad Vann, B.S.C. Instructor of Physical Education 

Assistant Coach 
Director of Physical Education for Men 

B.S.C, University of Mississippi, 1929 ; graduate student, University 
of Mississipi ; Louisiana State Unversity, 1935. 

Hewitt B. Vinnedge, A.B., A.M., B.D., S.T.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of History and Religious Education 

A.B., Miami University, 1921 ; A.M., University of Chicago, 1922 ; 

B.D., Nashotah House Seminary, 1933; S. T. M., ibid., 1942; Ph.D., 

Marquette University, 1928. 

J. F. Walker, B.A., M.S., Ph.D. .... Head of Div. of Biological Sciences 

Professor of Biology 

B.A., University of Mississippi, 1927 ; M.S., ibid., 1931 ; Ph.D., 
State University of Iowa, 1935. 

Nobie Ruth Warren, B.S Director of Nursery School 

Instructor in Child Development 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College, 1945 ; graduate study, University 
of Tennessee, summer 1946. 

Angeline Watkins, B.S., M.A. Assistant Professor of Physical 

Education for Women 

Y. W. C. A. Graduate School, 1934-35 ; B.S., Mississippi Southern 
College, 1936 ; M.A., Columbia University, 1942. 

Allie Webb, A.B., M.A. Assistant Professor of English 

A B., Mississippi State College for Women, 1922 ; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1927 ; graduate student University of North Carolina, 
1936, 1938, 1940. 

Leon A. Wilber, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of 

Social Studies 
Acting Head of Social Studies Division 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1927 ; M.A., ibid., 1929 ; Ph.D., ibid., 
1939. 

*Annette B. Wilder B.A. Librarian 

Critic Teacher, Language 

B.A., Mississippi Woman's College, 1929 ; graduate student, Tulane 
University, 1931. 

Rowlene Womble, Mus.B. Supervisor of Music Education 

at Demonstration School 

Mus.B., Mississippi State College for Women, 1943 ; graduate student, 
Northwestern University, 1944, 1945, 1946. 

* On Leave Winter Quarter. 



17 



Staff Members 



GRADUATE ASSISTANTS 

Fred L. Bro oks E ducation 

Lester C. Hatcher Mathematics 

Charles H. Keys Mathematics 

0. L. Ladnier Education 

Elizabeth B. Moore Biological Sciences 

Madelon M. Schwartz Languages and Literature 

Eric L. Thurston Social Studies 

Bertha L. Walley Reading Clinic 

STAFF MEMBERS 

Dorothy M. Allen, B.S. 

Secretary to Head of Graduate Studies Division 

Margaret R. Arnold, B.S Asst. Secretary to Financial Secretary 

E. V. Bridges . Electrician 

Helen F. Buchanan Assistant Hostess 

Mary Belle Burt Clerk, Financial Secretary's Office 

Selah Carmichael Hostess, Hattiesburg Hall 

Ettie Mae Daniel Hostess, Weathersby Hall 

C. C. Dearman, B.S., M.A..... Appraiser in Veterans Advisement Center 

S. S. Donald . Night Watchman 

H. Irl Ellzey, B.S Appraiser in Veterans' Advisement Center 

W. W. Eubanks, B.S., M.S Director of Buildings and Grounds 

Martha Frances Gandy, B.A. 

....Psychometrist and Secretary to Veterans' Guidance Center 

Jesse Gore Manager of College Bookstore 

Audrey Graham Asst. Secretary to Registrar 

Katherine Louise Grimes, B.S—Secretary to Deans of Men and Women 

Alleen Hathorn, B.A Secretary to Dean of College 

Marie 0. Hathorne, B.A Secretary to Extension Division 

W. M. Helton Engineer 

Miriam B. Howell Postmistress 

Ruby N. Howell Secretary in Extension & Correspondence Division 

Laverne Johnson, B.S Secretary to Demonstration School 

Emma Jones Secretary to Home Economics Division 

Adie J. Lancaster Clerk in Financial Secretary's Office 

Joyce G. Lindsey Assistant Secretary to the Registrar 

Maurice W. Milner Secretary in Alumni Office 

Mildred Morgan, B.S Secretary to Head of Division of Education 

V. M. Morgan.—. Bookkeeper 

Jane C. Mclnnis Secretary to President 

H. C. McLeod, M.D College Physician 

Katherine M. Nix_„_Secretary and Clerk, Financial Secretary's Office 

Mary Donavan Parker Coordinator, Veterans' Affairs 

Helen Singleton Hostess, Forrest County Hall 

Marianna S. Slay Asst. Secretary in the Office of Director of 

Extension & Correspondence 

Beedie E. Smith, R.N College Nurse 

Joicie Smith (Retired) Part-time Asst. in College Dining Hall 

Betty Stevens Asst. Secretary in the Office of the Registrar 

Nell Stonestreet Hostess, Stadium Dormitory 

Harry Thomas, B.S. —.Asst. Director in Veterans' Advisement Center 

and Appraiser 
Lindley Williams, B.S.— .Dietitian and Manager of College Dining Hall 
Delia Yelverton Hostess, Mississippi Hall 

18 



Faculty Committees 



FACULTY COMMITTEES, 1947-1948 

Academic Honors: Stout, Austin, Wilber, Lowrey, Bolton. 
Administrative Council: McLemore, Marsh, Dawson, Walker, Low- 
rey, Stout, Darby, Bigelow, Hickman, McQuagge, Wilber, 

Thompson, Austin, Pulley, Hall, Sumrall, Gough, Roberts, 

Smalling, Thomas. 
Art: Lok, Vinnedge, Nydegger, Hawkins, D'Olive. 
Athletic Committee: Pulliam, Hall, Smalling, President of Alumni 

Association. 
Calendar: Gough, Marsh, H. Jackson, McDonald, McQuagge, Lowrey. 
Certificates and Graduation: Stout, Pulley, Walker, Harlan., W. L. 

Johnson. 
Chapel Program: McLemore, Lowrey, Marsh, Gough, Walker, 

Schleifer, President of Christian Federation, President of Stu- 
dent Body. 
Christian Federation: Walker, Jones, H. Jackson, Wilber, Vinnedge, 

Gough, Womble, Gonzales, E. Q. Campbell, Magee, Thomae. 
Courtesy: E. Jones, Thompson, D'Olive, Hickman, W. Jackson, P. 

Campbell, Ford. 
Credits: McLemore, Pulley, W. L. Johnson, Webb, St. Clair. 
Curricula: McLemore, Bigelow, Sumrall, Wilber, Marsh, Stout, 

Thompson, Lowrey, Pulliam, Dawson, Austin, Walker, Pulley, 

0. Thomas. 
Discipline: Austin, Dawson. 

Examinations: McKee, Jones, Wilber, Pulliam, Jenkins. 
Extension and Correspondence: Hall, Pulliam, Freeny, Steede, 

Do well. 
Graduate Studies: Sumrall, McLemore, Wilber, Bigelow, Marsh, 

Lowrey, Napier, Pulliam, Stout. 
Health: Lowrey, Frazier, Milam, Switzer, Watkins, M. C. Johnson, 

Granberry, Hill. 
Housing: Smalling, Gough, Eubanks, Wilber. 
Landscaping: Eubanks, Smalling, Hinton. 
Library: Roberts, Stout, McQuagge, Wilber, Frazier, Sumrall, 

Wilder, Landskov. 
Lyceum: Marsh, St. Clair, Stout, Hruby, Hutchins. 
Miss. Hist. Affairs: McLemore, Stout, Bolton, Hickman, Roberts, 

Davis, Gonzales. 
Placement Bureau: Hall, Bigelow, Marsh, Thompson, Landskov. 
Publications: Darby, Cogdell, Hickman, McLemore, Students. 
Publicity: Cogdell, Marsh, Pulley, R. Green, Smalling. 
Scholarship: McLemore, Pulley, Shands, Thompson, Sumrall, Ader, 

01 sen. 
Student Enrollment: Austin, R. Green, Thompson, Hickman, Marsh, 

King, Darby, Cogdell, Bigelow, Hall, McKee. 
Student Social Life: Lowrey, Jones, Walker, Hickman, DeLano, 

Dawson, Baylis, H. Jackson, Thompson, Cooper, Wilber, Mc- 

N'eese, Griffis, Gough, S. McLemore. 
Veterans: Austin, Marsh, Frazier, Vann, Wilber, Darby, Nydegger, 

Hurst, J. Jones. 
Visual Education: Wilber, Frazier, Walker, Hall, D'Olive. 
* The President of the college is ex-officio member of all committees. 

19 



Historical 



HISTORICAL 

Mississippi Southern College, under the name of Mississippi 
Normal College, was founded by an act of the Legislature in 1910. 
No appropriation was made for the purchase of site nor for erection 
of buildings, but counties were authorized to issue bonds to offer as 
a bonus for the location of the college. Three southern counties vied 
with one another for the privilege, but Hattiesburg in Forrest County 
was awarded the location for a cash bonus of $260,000, a gift of 840 
acres of land and other valuable considerations. 

Buildings were erected and the College opened its doors in 1912. 

The purpose of the founders of the College was to train teach- 
ers for service in the public schools of Mississippi, and at the time of 
establishment of the College it was recognized that the greatest need 
of improvement lay in the rural schools. Salaries were low and the 
school term short. Many teachers did not have adequate high school 
training. In order to enable these teachers to profit by additional 
training, a Certificate Course was placed within their reach. Conse- 
quently hundreds of rural school teachers entered college, took pro- 
fessional and content courses, and have gone back and been active 
factors in the wonderful progress of the country schools during the 
past twenty-five years. In addition to the Certificate Course leading 
to a five-year state license, a Diploma Course, leading to a profession- 
al life license, was offered until 1929. 

In 1922 the Legislature authorized the College to grant degrees. 
Pre-college work was discontinued and curricula were set up leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science. In 1924 the name was changed to 
State Teachers College and again in 1940 to Mississippi Southern Col- 
lege. In 1934 the Trustees authorized the granting of the degree of 
Music Bachelor, in 1938 the granting of the Bachelor of Arts degree, 
and in 1947 the granting of the Master of Arts degree. 

The presidents of the college have been: Joe Cook, 1912-1929; 
Claude Bennett, 1929-1933; Jennings Bryan George, 1933-1945; Robert 
Cecil Cook, 1945—. 



20 



General Information 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



BUILDINGS 

The present buildings on the campus consist of twenty-three 
brick structures and a few frame buildings, all of which are steam- 
heated from a central heating plant. 

The Administration Building is a beautiful structure housing 
the offices of the Administration, and the Post Office. 

The Auditorium has a seating capacity of 1536 and stage fa- 
cilities for the largest dramatic productions. 

College Hall is a three-story, fire-proof building containing 
recitation rooms and offices. 

Science Hall is a four-story fire-proof building containing class- 
rooms and laboratories especially designed for science and commerce. 
The lower floor houses the Veterans Advisement Center, the book- 
store, and "Wimpy's." A new brick two-story fireproof building now 
adjoins Science Hall. On the lower floor is the Social Center, with 
well appointed recreation rooms for botr men and women. Beautiful 
French doors open onto a porch which connects the Social Center with 
the sunken garden. On the second floor is a small auditorium or 
lecture room seating 200, with one side divided into offices for various 
religious groups on the campus. 

Joe Cook Memorial Library is a two-story brick building con- 
taining four large reading rooms, reference and periodical rooms, of- 
fices, and stack rooms for 75,000 volumes. 

The Home Economics Building is a two-story structure in which 
are housed the Nursery School (the first in the state), classrooms, 
and laboratories of the Home Economics Department. 

Home Management Cottages are frame dwellings on the campus 
used by the Department of Home Economics for training of students 
in management of household affairs. 

The Demonstration School is a modern building of fourteen 
rooms and an auditorium. It affords facilities for observation, partici- 
pation, and practice teaching in all twelve grades of public school 
work. 

Demonstration School Gymnasium is a brick structure, enlarged 
and renovated during 1934 with the aid of funds from the Federal 
Government. Besides an ample playing floor and facilities for an 
audience of seven hundred people at games and exhibitions, it contains 
offices, storage rooms, lockers, showers, dressing rooms, and a lecture 
room. A recent addition has been a two-story frame annex available 
for class work and offices. 

Hattiesburg Hall and Mississippi Hall are dormitories for wom- 
en. Both are three-story, fire-proof buildings of modern construction. 
They contain comfortable bedrooms and reception halls, and well ap- 
pointed bathrooms on each floor. 

21 



General Information 



Forrest County Hall is a three-story, fire-proof building of 
modern construction with a spacious reception hall. The first floor is 
for faculty use. The second and third floors are for men. Each floor 
has comfortable bedrooms and well appointed bathrooms. 

Stadium-Dormitory is a dormitory for men. It is a new fire- 
proof building' constructed on modern lines, housing one hundred and 
sixty men. The stadium will seat six thousand people at Faulkner 
Field and furnishes the facilities of an athletic clubhouse. Tempor- 
ary stands on the opposite side accommodate 2500 people. 

The Band Hall, a two story brick structure, is used by the Band 
and by the Industrial Arts department. 

The Hospital is a two story, brick structure, adequate for taking 
care, of the minor ailments of students. A trained nurse is in charge 
and on hand at all times, and the regular college physician is subject 
to call to give medical attention to students needing emergency at- 
tention. 

The Dining Hall is a modern structure with seating capacity of 
one thousand. It has all modern conveniences for reducing labor to a 
minimum, for storing and preserving foods, and for serving well- 
planned, attractive meals. 

The Power House is a sixty thousand dollar fire-proof structure 
erected in 1934. It houses the central heating plant and work shops 
for the college engineers. 

Swimming Pool, 45' by 105', recently constructed, with showers 
and locker rooms adjoining, and lighted for night use, is of modern 
design with machinery for filtering and purifying the water every 
eight hours. 

The Memorial Station, at the campus entrance, is a small, beau- 
tiful structure given by students, faculty, officers, and friends of the 
college, and erected in honor of the students, officers, and faculty 
members who participated actively in the World War of 1914-1918. 

McClesky Hall is a fourteen apartment building for faculty mem- 
bers. There are four three-bedroom apartments, six two-bedroom 
apartments, two one-bedroom apartments, and two efficiency apart- 
ments. 

McMillin Hall is 24-apartment house for Veterans of World War 
II. Each apartment consists of a living-room-bedroom, a bathroom 
and kitchen. 

Weathersby Hall, a new dormitory for men, is a brick fire-proof 
building constructed on modern lines, housing 120 students. 

The Pan-Hellenic Building is a new frame two-story building 
housing sorority rooms upstairs, and one sorority room, hostess apart- 
ment, general kitchen, and spacious lobby downstairs. 

The Department of Music is housed in a new temporary Music 
Hall, a large modern frame building devoted entirely to musical pur- 
poses, housing fifteen teaching studios, twenty-four practice rooms, 
each equipped with one or more pianos, a small auditorium seating 

22 



General Information 



150, an instrumental room used for the Little Symphony and Sym- 
phonic Band rehearsals, a choral room for the Vesper Choir and 
Choral Union rehearsals, two classrooms, and litesning room with 
large record library. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Student Government. Student government has been in effect 
on the campus since 1944. The social life on the campus and in the 
dormitories is under student control. The Student Council composed 
of representatives chosen by the student body and various organiza- 
tions is the student governing body. 

Alpha Mu Chi. An honorary musical club was organized in 
1933. The purpose of this organization is to promote among its mem- 
bers a better feeling of fellowship, and to instill in each of them a de- 
sire for high scholarship in music. 

Religious Organizations. The Mississippi Southern College is a 
state school and entirely non-sectarian. Religious life is encouraged 
and every effort made to co-operate with the local churches. The 
Christian Federation unites the activities of all religious groups on 
the campus. Its executive council is composed of two elected represen- 
tatives of the student body who serve as chairman and vice-chairman, 
and the presidents of all religious organizations on the campus. The 
Federation works through a number of committees whose chairman 
form the Federation Cabinet. The Christian Federation seeks to pro- 
vide channels for worship and religious development on the campus. 
It sponsors Religious Emphasis Week on the campus each soring. It 
maintains Pine Haven Lodge, a memorial hut, for the use of any col- 
lege group for social and recreational functions. The Federation is 
financed by a percentage of the proceeds from Wimpy's, the campus 
store. 

The Wesley Foundation, The Baptist Student Union, The Y. W. 
A., The Westminster Fellowship, The Canterbury Club, and The New- 
man Club are student denominational groups on the campus. 

Vespers. On Wednesday and Sunday evenings under the 
auspices of the Christian Federation, vesper services are held. Vespers 
on our campus are short inspirational meetings at which time speak- 
ers from the student body, faculty, and local churches are heard. 

The Ministerial League. Each year there are a number of men 
on the campus who are ministers or studying for the ministry. They 
are of several denominations and have organized the Ministerial 
League to discuss varying problems in their field and also that they 
may be of help in fostering religious life on the campus. 
i 

The Elementary Council. This group has for its aim the sup- 
plementing of training acquired through the usual channels of study. 
Outstanding educators are brought in for addresses and a spirit of ac- 
tive interest in any new development in any phase of child welfare is 
fostered. 

The P. E. M. Club. This is a social organization sponsored by 
the Department of Physical Education for Physical Education majors. 

The Home Economics Club. This is an organization open to all 
who are interested in the broad field of Home Economics. Majors in 

23 



General Information 



this department are to take part in the programs so that a closer re- 
lationship with others may be attained. 

The International Relations Club. This group is affiliated with 
the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. It has for its pur- 
pose the creating of a spirit of world friendship among all people 
through the study and discussion of world problems. The club is fost- 
ered by the Division of Social Studies. The membership is confined to 
students of outstanding interest and attainment in the field. 

The M Club. This is a social organization composed of the 
young men who have earned their varsity letters in intercollegiate 
competition. 

Modern Language Club. The Modern Language Club is an or- 
ganization of modern language students. It holds regular meetings 
every other week at which time interesting and varied programs are 
presented. The club plans to bring about better understandings and 
relationships among the peoples whose languages are being studied. 
Programs on the art, music, literature, manners and customs of for- 
eign people are given. Sponsors are Miss H. Jackson and Mr. Melvin 
G. Nydegger. 

Clef Club. The Clef Club is an honorary club for Bandsmen. Its 
aims and objectives are: (1) To promote the college band through all 
ethical means; (2) To honor outstanding bandsmen through privilege 
of membership; (3) To stimulate campus leadership; (4) To foster a 
close relat'onship between college bands; (5) To provide a pleasant 
and helpful social experience for all engaged in college band work. 

Commerce Club. The purpose of this club is to promote interest 
in the business and professional world and the study of commercial 
subjects. It encourages a social spirit by offering frequent social 
functions. The Commerce Club makes it possible for students to be- 
come familiar with modern progressive business methods and systems, 
endeavoring by such means to raise and maintain a higher standard 
of training for business. It strives to create more interest and under- 
standing in the intelligent choice of business occupations, and to de- 
velope competent, aggressive business leadership. Meetings are held 
monthly. 

Veteran's Club. The Veteran's Club was organized June 12, 1946, 
for the purpose of promoting the interest of all veterans enrolled in 
this school in a practical, legal, educational manner. Any former 
member of the armed forces or the merchant marine is eligible for 
membership in the organization. 

Home Economics Club. The Home Economics Club is an organ- 
ization open to all who are interested in the field. Its purpose is to 
foster closer relationships between its members and to develop more 
useful, all-round citizens of the home, community, state, and nation. 

Ole Southern Club. The Ole Southern. Club is an organization 
founded by a group of students interested in furthering the social life 
of the campus. The club is based on fraternity rules. 

Pre-Med Club. An honorary scholastic club organized in 1946 
for the purpose of furnishing a goal toward which the intended medic- 
al student may strive. Outstanding doctors from the state are 

24 



General Information 



brought in to address the club and any phase of medicine or social 
welfare is fostered to give the student a clearer picture of the pro- 
fession. Membership is confined to those students who have attained 
a high scholastic average during the first year of their pre-medical 
work. At the present the organization is seeking membership in the 
national honorary scholastic fraternity, Alpha Epsilon, Delta. 

Future Teachers of America. The George Hurst Chapter of the 
F. T. A. was organized in November,1946, to bring to the students the 
motivating power of a lifelong purpose and a nationwide outlook. It 
is designed to develop ideals and power in the lives of its members; to 
enrich the spirit of college life; to advance the interests of the teach- 
ing profession; to promote the welfare of children; and to foster the 
education of all the people. 

American Legion. Mississippi Southern Memorial Post, 153, was 
formed as a service to the student veterans of Mississippi Southern 
College. Any veteran that served his country honorably is eligible 
for membership. The club is sponsoring an Americanism program 
and participating in the "Mississippi Boys' Week, Inc." The post has 
a service officer to handle any matter pertaining to the veteran. 

V. F. W. The Mississippi Southern College Post of the Veterans 
of Foreign Wars has as its chief aims and purposes better cooperation 
among the students, the veterans, and the faculty; the improvement 
of education in any way that is possible; stronger fellowship on the 
campus; and to assist veterans in any way possible while on the camp- 
us. 

Dramatics Club. The purpose of the club is to develop dramatic 
talent and the art of acting; to cultivate a taste for the best in the 
drama and radio; and to stimulate interest in dramatics in both of 
these fields for those who do not participate in the actual activities 
of the club. Membership in the club is voluntary and those interested 
in dramatics are urged to join. 

The Sociology Club has been formed primarily to aid those maj- 
oring and minoring in. sociology in becoming better acquainted per- 
sonally in acquiring information concerning vocational opportunities 
in sociology and in acquainting themselves with the problems of soci- 
ology in the south Mississippi area. The Club obtains adequate infor- 
mation concerning needs and desires of the students which can be 
met in the teaching of sociology. 

Sororities and Fraternities. There are on the campois five so- 
rorities and one fraternity. Three of the sororities are national 
sororities and two are local. 

In order of their establishment on the campus, they are Sigma 
Theta Kappa, Mu Omega, both local, and Sigma Sigma Sigma, Alpha 
Sigma Alpha, Delta Sigma Epsilon. 

Fraternities are represented by a chapter of Zeta Sigma, Alpha 
Delta Mu, Beta Kappa Tau. 

The Student Printz is the college newspaper. The Printz is pub- 
lished bi-weekly by a staff of students under the direction of faculty 
advisers. It provides a medium through which the students may ex- 
press themselves and serves as an agency for diseminating news 
among the students and alumni. 

25 



General Information 



The Southerner. The college annual is a yearly publication. It 
is published by a student staff under the direction of a faculty ad- 
viser. 

The Alumni News. This is a quarterly bulletin carrying items 
of interest to alumni and friends of the school. 

Wimpy's. The college store is operated under lease from the 
Athletic Association. Located in the basement of Science Hall it is 
a gathering place for students. The rent from the store is used to 
help the Athletic Association on the campus and to partially support 
the Christian Federation. 

The Veterans Lounge. The lodge on the golf course is used as a 
veterans lounge. It has been furnished as a place for the veterans to 
spend their leisure time. The veterans association meets here and 
from time to time social events sponsored by the veterans are held 
here. 

Band. The band is made up of students and is maintained to 
play for the athletic events and other student activities. The band 
furnishes an opportunity for students desiring band work to become 
more proficient and provides practice teaching for those desiring to 
be band masters. 

The Hattiesburg Choral Union. This is an Oratorio Chorus 
composed of students and citizens of Hattiesburg, which meet once 
a week for the purpose of studying the great master choral works. 
They present "The Messiah" at Christmas time. 

The Vesper Choir. This is a choral organization composed 
chiefly of students. For many years it has been the custom for the 
choir to tour the state during National Music Week, presenting pro- 
grams of sacred and secular music. The choir sang in Philadelphia, Pa,. 
and Indianapolis, Ind., before the National Federation of Music Clubs, 
and has sung before the Louisiana State Federation of Music Clubs. 

The Hattiesburg Concert Association. The Hattiesburg Concert 
Association arranges an annual series of concerts by celebrated artists 
which are held in the college auditorium. General tuition fees cover 
student admission to these events. The attractions offered in 1946- 
1947 were Paul Draper and Larry Adler; Eugene List; Leonard War- 
ren; and Rosario and Antonio; in 1947-48 the concerts inclded Chris- 
thopher Lynch, enor; the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra and Vonski 
Bobbin, duo piano team. 

Intramural Athletics. A program of season leisure time sports 
is operated by the students under the supervision of the Department 
of Physical Education. Each student has an opportunity to take part 
in sports for which he is physically fitted. The intramural organiza- 
tion and schedule are described in the student handbook. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

Students are employed for some stenographic service, janitor 
service, and work on campus, in post office, and library. Students are 
cautioned, however, against counting too much on this manner of de- 
fraying any great part of the college expenses. Applications for stu- 
dent employment should be made in advance to the President. The 

26 



General Information 



amount that may be earned in any one quarter is determined by the 
number of hours a student works. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

There are a number of scholarships offered to students of 
Mississippi Southern College. Some of these scholarships are given 
by the college and others are awarded by organizations interested in 
encouraging promising students to continue their college education. 

Students who are interested in securing a scholarship or a loan 
should write the President of the College. 

MISSISSIPPI SOUTHERN COLLEGE ALUMNI 
ASSOCIATION 

The Alumni Association has been in existence since the fifth year 
of the college. During the early years its chief function was related 
to the placement service. Beginning with the session of 1945-46, the 
organization experienced a re-birth. Recognizing the fact that a 
"working" alumni association is vital to the development of the col- 
lege, the executive committee began the organization of alumni groups 
in the various counties of the state. 

Early in the 1945-46 session, the Executive Committee, in coop- 
eration with the college administration, began the publication of the 
ALUMNI NEWS which is mailed to all alumni whose addresses are 
available. It is the desire of the committee that all of the graduates 
and former students of the Mississippi Southern College become ac- 
tive members of the Alumni Association. 

Two meetings of the state-wide Association are held each fiscal 
year, the first at the annual Homecoming in the fall, and the second 
at the Mississippi Education Association convention in Jackson. 

The president of the Association is A. F. Megehee, the vice-presi- 
dent is S. A. Brasfield, the secretary is Mrs. Laura Mae Carter, and 
the executive secretary is 0. N. Darby. The executive committee is 
composed of Dr. William 0. Goyer, S. J. Ingram, D. C. Leech, C. L. 
Milling, and Leo Z. Seal. 

BEST CITIZEN AWARDS 

At the beginning of each academic year the President shall ap- 
point a secret committee of nine from the faculty whose duty it shall 
be near the end of the academic year to select two students who 
through superior character, leadership, and scholarship, have made the 
greatest contribution to the life of the college during the year. One 
man and one woman are selected. Upon recommendation of this com- 
mittee the students so selected shall receive the BEST CITIZEN 
awards as a public recognition of services. 

Since the institution of the Best Citizen Awards in 1936 the fol- 
lowing students have received such recognition: 1936 — Miss Mary 
Evelyn Blanks and Mr. Shelby Rogers; 1937 — Miss Katie Ruth Field 
and Mr. Doris W. Rivers; 1938 — Miss Lida Frances Gilliam and Mr. 
Thomas Carruth; 1939 — Miss Virginia Cole and Mr. Buell Evans; 
1940 — Miss Ruth Martin and Mr. F. J. Dickey; 1941 — Miss Hazelme 
Wood and Mr. Gerald Adams; 1942 — Miss Dulcie Davidge and Mr. 

27 



General Information 



Leonard Lowrey; 1943 — Miss Evelyn Hooutt and Mr. Moran Pope; 
1944 — Miss Wilda Mae Mason; 1945— Miss Doris Fredendoll; 1946 — 
Miss Colleen. Gilmore; 1947 — Miss Bessie Jean Carraway and Mr. 
Leonard G. Anderson. 

LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS 

How to Reserve a Room: Send $8.00 to the Financial Secretary. 
If you have a preference for roommate, have this person send fee at 
the same time. Rooms are reserved in the dormitories in the order 
in which room fees are received. The room reservation fee will be cre- 
dited to your account when you register. No room deposit can be re- 
funded unless the reservation is cancelled ten days prior to the open- 
ing of the quarter for which the reservation is made. 

Rooms are equipped with the following furniture: Two single 
beds with comfortable inner-spring mattresses, a dresser, a chest of 
drawers, lavatory, two chairs, and a study table. Students must fur- 
nish all linens, bed covering, pillow, curtains for windows and closet 
doors. Dormitories are equipped with air ventilation system. 

Furnished apartments at moderate rentals will be available to 
married students, both veteran and non-veteran, at Shelby Village, 
located 13 miles south of the campus. Convenient busses will be op- 
erated. Rentals will vary from $42.00 to $57.00 for the quarter, in- 
cluding utilities. Write for particulars. 

A limited number of trailers, houses and apartments are avail- 
able for married Veterans of World War II on the campus. 

If the dormitories are filled, living accommodations outside the 
dormitories must be selected from the list approved by the college 
authorities. 

Further information concerning housing may be obtained from 
the office of the Financial Secretary. 

All students not living in their own homes, whether rooming in 
the dormitories or in private homes or rooming houses, are subject 
to the regulations, control and supervision of the College. The Col- 
lege uses its efforts to safeguard such students, but no responsibility 
can be assumed. 

LIBRARY 

The Joe Cook Memorial Library, erected in 1939 near the center 
of the campus, is planned for the purpose of furnishing the students 
and faculty of the college modern facilities for reading and research 
under pleasant conditions. Two main reading rooms with a seating 
capacity of one hundred and fifty are located on the first floor and 
house the reference collection of standard encyclopedias, dictionaries, 
indexes and bound periodicals. The periodical room is supplied with 
approximately 225 current magazines and a number of the best daily 
papers. Also on this floor are the book stacks, three floors high with 
a planned capacity of seventy-five thousand volumes. At present there 
are approximately 35,000 books cataloged by the Dewey Decimal class- 
ification. The library is a depository for government publications which 
are housed on the second floor. This floor also contains faculty study 
rooms, the graduate study room and an informal reading room. 

28 



General Information 



PLACEMENT BUREAU 

The Mississippi Southern College maintains an active program 
of teacher placement and attempts to keep in constant touch with the 
demands and requirements of the schools of the state and with the 
qualifications of its graduates who are trained for the teaching pro- 
fession. A secretary is employed full time in actively furthering the 
service of the Bureau. The College has many calls for rural, element- 
ary, high school teachers, and teachers of special subjects. Those stu- 
dents who have made good records in their fields and in the training 
schools, are always in demand. The Placement Bureau endeavors to 
serve the graduates, and the schools of the state by selecting careful- 
ly those whom it recommends to various positions. 

A carefully organized system of records pertaining to the stu- 
dent's work in both his academic and professional course is on file. 
Confidential information organized in the most approved form for the 
convenience of school officials is available on a short notice. 

Student credentials supply the following data relative to each 
candidate; (1) teaching experience in the public schools; (2) the cur- 
riculum pursued; (3) number of college hours in major and minor 
fields; (4) academic record in college; (5) comments from critic teach- 
ers, instructors, and various superintendents (under whom the student 
has taught, also character references. 

Any person interested may secure further information from the 
Director of the Placement Service at The Mississippi Southern College. 

THE LABORATORY SCHOOL 

The Laboratory School, commonly known as Demonstration 
School, is a fundamental part of the teacher-education program. It 
serves as an integrating center in which students from all divisions 
may do research in this particular field. 

The first major purpose is to provide a modern school from the 
first through the twelfth grades. This program is designed to meet the 
needs of the children and the community which it serves. 

The second major purpose of the school is to provide college 
students with an opportunity to do observation, student teaching, and 
some educational research. The school gives to the prospective teach- 
er, in as natural, realistic a setting as possible, the privilege of actual- 
ly beginning his teaching career <under intelligent and sympathetic 
supervision. 

The school is housed in a modern brick building and organized 
on the basis of six years of elementary education and six years of 
secondary education. 

NURSERY SCHOOL 

The College Nursery School was established as a unit within the 
Division of Home Economics to provide a laboratory in which college 
students might observe the development and relationships of a group 
of normal, healthy young children and to participate in directing the 
various nursery school activities. The nursery school accommodates 
sixteen children between the ages of two and five years and operates 

29 



General Information 



on a full day's schedule (nine o'clock in the morning to three o'clock 
in the afternoon) five days per week. The daily program is planned 
so as to create an environment rich in possibilities for mental, physi- 
cal, social, and emotional growth of each child. The group has an 
equal number of boys and girls in the various age groups. 

The Nursery School, which was the first to be established in the 
state, is located on the first floor of the Home Economics Building. 
The Nursery School, having ample space indoors and a large porch 
and fenced-in play yard outdoors, meets high standards in both space 
and equipment. Registration for the Nursery School must be made 
with the Director of the Nursery School well in advance of the time 
the child is to be enrolled. 

STUDENT TEACHING IN HOMEMAKING 

Student Teaching for Home Economics majors may be done on 
or off the campus. Homemaking is taught at the Laboratory School 
on the campus to the eighth grade and in first and second year classes 
in the high school. These classes, when being taught by a supervising 
teacher, are observed by all student teachers. These classes are also 
used for on-campus student teaching. 

Off-campus centers are chosen in which the homemaking pro- 
gram is recognized for the quality of work being done. The teacher in 
these centers must meet the requirements set up in the Mississippi 
State Plan for Vocational Home Economics. This teacher with the as- 
sistance of a supervising professor from the college helps the student 
with her teaching problems. The student lives in the community during 
her six weeks teaching period. 

THE HOME MANAGEMENT HOUSES 

The Home Management Houses are two residences on the campus 
in which every Home Economics senior lives for one quarter. Here 
the girls are able to apply the principles that have been taught the 
preceding years. 

Nourishing meals are planned, prepared and served by the girls, 
to the six students and one faculty member residing there. Meals are 
planned at different income levels so as to better prepare students for 
living within their income. Careful attention is given to marketing 
problems. Efficient methods of working, and proper care of food and 
utensils are emphasized. A Home Management House garden helps to 
provide fresh vegetables. 

Desirable methods of caring for the house and its equipment are 
included. Each group makes its own budget for the quarter and keeps 
an expense account, balancing records at end of each hostess period 
and again at the end of the quarter. Opportunities are given in selec- 
tion of house furnishings as well as in arranging and keeping the 
house attractive. The care and responsibility of a baby is included. 
Special plans are made and carried out for the recreation of the Home 
Management House family group as well as planned entertainments 
for friends. Students feel that this experience is one of the most 
valuable in their whole curriculum. 

30 



General Information 



THE READING CLINIC 

In May, 1946 a Reading Clinic was opened at Mississippi South- 
ern College. The clinical unit, consisting of offices, individual teach- 
ing rooms, a psychological testing room and observation rooms, is 
housed on the second floor of College Hall. The psychological testing- 
room is equipped with "one-way" glass for the convenience of students 
doing observation in diagnostic and remedial reading and for parents 
who wish to observe their child being tested. 

The clinic is equipped with the finest instruments and materials 
of instruction obtainable. An adequate library of interesting easy 
books is provided for pupils who find reading difficult. Use is made 
of teacher-made material and basal readers in the instructional pro- 
gram. 

The objectives of the reading clinic are threefold: Namely (1) 
to assist children who are retarded in educational status because of 
some specific cause; (2) to train teachers in scientific diagnosis and 
remedial guidance; and (3) to execute research in the objective study 
and guidance of pupil life. 

Remedial instruction in the clinic is offered on three levels: the 
elementary school level; the secondary school level; and the college 
level. 

Children are referred to the clinic by teachers, parents, eye 
specialists and other agencies. The fee for a complete educational 
diagnosis and a program of remedial procedures and suggestive mate- 
rials of instruction is $10.00. The fee for individual remedial instruc- 
tion is $15.00 per month. 

THE READING CONFERENCE 

In connection with the program in the Reading Clinic, the annual 
Reading Conference (Education 104 A, B, and C) is conducted the 
first term of the summer quarter. Outstanding authorities in the 
fields related to the work in the Clinic present papers, lead discus- 
sions and give demonstrations in the fields of their specialization. 
The faculty of the college demonstration school teach demonstration 
lessons in line with the general theme of the conference. The Read- 
ing Conference may be taken three times for credit. Teachers who 
have had the Reading Conference previous to this year should enroll 
for either Education 104 B or C. 

WORKSHOP PROGRAM 

Mississippi Southern College operates a number of workshops 
during the spring and summer in strategic locations. These worlc 
conferences are open to school administrators and teachers, welfare 
workers, rural ministers and community leaders. The purpose of 
these work conferences is to furnish opportunity for the solution of 
instructional problems under the guidance of experienced leaders and 
consultants. 

The emphasis will be placed on efficient classroom teaching, 
stressing reading, health education, recreation and playground activi- 
ties, music, and arts and crafts as phases of a well-rounded school- 
community program. 

31 



General Information 



Each workshop is five or six weeks in length. A member may 
use the credit for renewal of teachers' certificates, for professional 
advancement, for refresher courses in the field of his particular inter- 
est, or toward graduation. Three off-campus workshops may be ap- 
plied as residence credit toward graduation, but such attendance can- 
not be counted in lieu of required attendance on the campus. Only 
undergraduate courses and problems are offered by Mississippi South- 
ern College in off-campus workshops. 

Fees for on-campus workshops are the same as those charged for 
other on-campus courses of comparable credit. Fees for off-campus 
workshops total $30 for eight quarter hours credit, plus a library fee 
of $2.50. 

The demand for workshops on the part of teachers and adminis- 
trators has steadily grown since this type of teacher-education was 
introduced at Mississippi Southern College, and it will not be possible 
to organize and staff such conferences in all communities desiring 
them. Hence, locations are determined on the basis of need and 
greatest service. Workshops are organized only in those communities 
where we may serve a substantial number of persons who cannot be 
adequately served from the campus, and where the full and positive 
support and cooperation of school officials is assured. 

INTRA AMERICAS CULTURAL RELATIONS 
INSTITUTE 

(1) Purpose: To establish better understandings and relation- 
ships between the Americas. 

(2) To provide in South Mississippi for Modern Language 
Teachers a center for the exchange of ideas, realia, visual aids and 
information of general value to modern language teachers. Special 
modern language workshops and clinics will be conducted by the In- 
stitute for the language teachers of the State. At these workshops, 
prominent and noted educators in the field of modern languages will 
be invited to address the teachers. In addition, realia houses, publish- 
ing firms and commercial firms will be invited and encouraged to ex- 
hibit realia, texts, publications an.d products and trade material of 
Latin America. It is hoped that a realia library to include films, 
film strips, slides and other realia and loan packets of useful and in- 
teresting material can be arranged and be made available on a loan 
basis to the teachers of the state. Further, during these workshops 
specific problems relating to the teaching of modern languages will 
be discussed and worked out by the teachers themselves. 

(2) To promote the advantages and possibilities in South Mis- 
sissippi, of commerce and trade with Latin America. 

(4) Through the medium of the exchange of students and teach- 
ers, the educational systems and methods of Latin America will be 
studied and visiting Latin American students and professors will be 
given an opportunity to study our methods and principles. This 
should result in the introduction into both systems of the best methods 
and principles used in either country. 

(4) Finally, it is expected that a great impetus will be given to 
the study of language in the schools in the state through the stimu- 
lation of student-teacher-public interest in the values attained through 
the study of foreign languages. 

32 



Extension and School Service 



EXTENSION AND SCHOOL SERVICE 

E. E. HALL, Chairman 
(A Special Bulletin is available on request.) 

EXTENSION OFFERINGS 

The offerings of the Division of Extension are of three general 
types as follows: 

A. Extension work by class instruction in college courses where 
the teacher meets the classes at some study center provided by the 
class. 

B. Extension work by correspondence in college courses where 
the student works out written assignments which are sent by mail to 
the Correspondence Department. These assignments are graded by 
the instructor handling the course, and the grades are recorded in 
the Correspondence Department. 

The college has a contract with the Veterans Administration to 
furnish college correspondence under the G. I. Bill to Veterans. For 
further information write Extension Division, Mississippi Southern 
College, Hattiesburg, Mississippi. 

C. Extension work by correspondence in high school subjects 
where a high school student works out assignments which are sent by 
mail to the Correspondence Department. These assignments are 
graded by an instructor in the Demonstration High School. The 
grades are recorded in some high school in South Mississippi by con- 
sent of the high school superintendent of that school. 

The college has a contract with the Veterans Administration to 
furnish high school correspondence under the G. I. Bill to veterans 
desiring to complete their high school work. For information about 
high school correspondence address inquiries to the Extension Di- 
vision, Mississippi Southern College, Hattiesburg, Mississippi. 

The work of the Extension Division is organized to conform to 
the regulations of the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools and the regulations of the National Extension Association of 
Teachers Colleges. 

EXTENSION CLASS STUDY 

1. Mississippi Southern College is anxious to serve the teachers 
of Mississippi through the extension classes and workshops. Ar- 
rangements have been made to offer by extension any course includ- 
ed in the regular college catalogue on condition that satisfactory 
library and laboratory facilities are available. In the Departments 
of Health, English, Education, Psychology, Geography, History, and 
Social Science, it is possible to offer a number of courses without 
special library arrangements other than those available through the 
college. 

2. Any person qualified to profit by an extension course may 
be admitted to the classes for non-credit study. However, those who 
expect college credit for a course must meet regular admission re- 
quirements. Students will not be permitted to do extension work 
during regular attendance at any college. 



Extension and School Service 



3. Extension classes spend the same number of hours in recita- 
tion as are required for the same course taken in residence. No ex- 
tension class may meet for more than sixteen hours in one week or 
four hours in one day. No extension course may continue after the 
opening of the second term of the spring quarter. 

4. Any person wishing an extension center to be organized 
should send a written request to the Extension Division at Mississippi 
Southern College and also to his city superintendent or county super- 
intendent. It is hoped that city superintendents and county superin- 
tendents will have their teachers express .their desires for extension 
offerings so that arrangements may be made with the Extension Di- 
vision to offer the desired course. It is desired that at least twenty 
persons should agree upon the same course before the college can 
send an extension teacher. 

5. The registration fee for extension is $3.00 per quarter hour. 
A four quarter hour course will cost $12.00. 

6. The Mississippi Southern College Bookstore will sell or rent 
the books to students taking extension work. The rental fee is $1.50 
per book. 

7. No student may register in an extension course after the 
second meeting. All fees are to be paid not later than the second 
meeting of the course. 

8. Fees are not transferable. 

CORRESPONDENCE STUDY 
General Regulations 

1. The matriculation fee for a correspondence course is $3.00 
per quarter hour. Thus, the fee for a four hour course is $12.00, and 
for a two hour course $6.00. 

2. The Mississippi Southern College Bookstore will sell or rent 
the books to students taking correspondence courses. The rental fee 
is $1.50 per book for a three month period. Any correspondence 
about books should be addressed to the Mississippi Southern College 
Bookstore, Station A, Hattiesburg, Mississippi and not to the Exten- 
sion Division. 

3. Fees are not returnable after lesson assignments have gone 
out of the correspondence office. Fees are not transferable. 

4. If credit is desired, the student must meet the usual college 
entrance requirements and the course prerequisites. Only those 
courses numbered below one hundred are open to students of freshman 
or sophomore rank. 

5. No more than forty-eight quarter hours earned in extension 
and correspondence may be counted toward a degree from Mississippi 
Southern College. All of the forty-eight hours may be earned by 
extension or all of the forty-eight hours may be by correspondence or 
in any combination of the two as long as the total is not more than 
forty-eight quarter hours. 

34 



Extension and School Service 



6. Students seeking enrollment for correspondence study courses 
are required to fill out an application blank for each course desired. 

7. Textbooks are ordered by the student from the college book- 
store or from the publishers whose names and addresses are listed 
on the first assignment sheet. 

8. The maximum time for the completion of a four hour course 
(twenty-four lessons) is one year from the date of acceptance of the 
application. For reasons considered adequate by the Extension Di- 
vision this time may be extended for one year upon the payment of 
a fee of $3.00. Applications for extension of time should be accom- 
panied by the fee for such extension. No such application can be 
considered unless received sixty days before the date of expiration of 
the course. 

9. No student will be permitted to rush through a correspond- 
ence course for any reason. 

10. The minimum time for the completion of a course is four 
weeks from the date of beginning work, provided assignments are 
sent in two or three at a time at regular intervals proportionately 
spaced over the minimum time. 

11. No work may be done by correspondence while a student is 
in attendance at any institution of learning unless he has written 
permission of the dean of his college. It must be understood that if 
correspondence is allowed while in residence, it becomes a part of the 
student's load for the quarter, and this work must be completed with- 
in that quarter. Examination on a course must be taken during the 
time of the regular examinations for the quarter. 

12. A student should not enroll for more than one course at a 
time. 

13. As the lessons are completed, the student mails or brings 
them to the Extension Division for correction by the instructor. 

14. No credit will be allowed on a course which is completed in 
less than the minimum time of four weeks, exclusive of the time the 
student may be engaged in residence work at any institution. 

15. Credit will not be allowed when there is evidence that un- 
fair assistance has been obtained either on the lessons or the final 
examination. 

16. Several students have failed their courses because they have 
copied their notes or from the textbook during the examination. The 
examination is to be taken under a city superintendent or a county 
superintendent and without the use of notes or the textbook. 

17. Several persons taking correspondence have failed during 
the past year because they have worked up their assignments too 
rapidly and have not studied the textbook thoroughly enough so that 
they could pass the examination on the course. 

18. The Correspondence Department is not responsible for les- 
sons lost in the mail due to insufficient postage or otherwise. 

19. Teachers in service will not be allowed to complete more 
than eight quarter hours per quarter. Correspondence work and ex- 
tension may be taken at the same time if the rule that no more than 
eight quarter hours may be taken in any one quarter is observed. 

Rules For Preparation of Assignments 

1. Use 8^x11 light weight typing paper. Envelopes addressed 

35 



Extension and School Service 



to the Division of Extension are sent with the outline of the course. 
The lessons must be mailed in these envelopes, three or more assign- 
ments to an envelope. 

2. In preparing the recitation, observe carefully the following 
rules: 

a. Write on one side of the paper only. 

ib. Write with ink or use typewriter. 

c. Leave a margin of one inch on the left side of the paper. 

3. Write your name and address, the name of the course, and 
number of the recitation paper at the top of the first page of each 
lesson. 

4. The recitation paper must contain only the lesson; all busi- 
ness and other communications must be written on a separate sheet 
and mailed in a separate envelope. We are not responsible for any 
delay caused by letters being enclosed in assignments. 

5. Return all assignment sheets together at the end of the 
course with the last lesson. 

Mailing of Lessons 

1. In the upper left corner of the envelope addressed "Depart- 
ment of Extension", in which the recitation paper is enclosed, write 
your full name and address. 

2. In the lower left corner of the envelope, write the name of 
the course and numbers of the assignments. 

3. Have your lessons weighed before mailing; be sure there is 
enough postage on them. When the postage is insufficient, the les- 
sons will not be accepted by the Extension Division until full postage 
has been paid. 

Examination Instructions 

1. The lesson assignments are intended to assist the student in 
preparation for the examination. 

2. Upon completion of the assignments the student must imme- 
diately take up with the Correspondence Department arrangements 
for the examination. 

3. Final examinations are held either by regular instructors of 
Mississippi Southern College, instructors in other institutions of 
higher learning, county superintendents, or superintendents of inde- 
pendent districts selected by the student and approved by the Director 
of Correspondence. A student may defer examination on a completed 
course until he enters the college for residence work, in which case 
the examination must be taken within one week after the student 
registers. 

4. A student may not spend more than three hours on the ex- 
amination. 

5. Before beginning the examination, all books and papers must 
be removed from the desk except the examination papers. 

6. The student must use ink when writing the examination. 

36 



Extension and School Service 



COURSES OFFERED BY CORRESPONDENCE 



Commerce 

55 Principles of Economics, Har- 
lan 

107 Economics of Consumption, 
Harlan 

134 Salesmanship, Harlan 

166 Business Law I, Harlan 

167 Business Law II, Harlan 

Education 

20 Introduction to Education, 

Bigelow 
101 Arithmetic in the Elementary 

Grades, Jones 
107 Teaching of Reading and Eng- 
lish in Lower Elementary 

Grades,, Jones 
109 Teaching of Reading in the 

Upper Elementary Grades, Pul- 

liam 
113 Principles of Teaching in High 

School, Bigelow 
143 Methods and Materials in the 

Elementary Grades, Pulliam 

162 Curriculum of the Secondary 
Schools, Landskov 

163 Laboratory Problems in Cur- 
riculum Construction, Landskov 

169 Tests and Measurements, Bige- 
low 

English 

75 Survey of English Literature, 
Darby 

76 Survey of English Literature, 
Webb 

80 Survey of American Literature, 
Olsen 
125 Romantic Poets, Webb 
138 Writing Brief Fiction, Darby 
148 Writing Magazine Articles, 
Darby 

Fine Arts 

140 Art Appreciation, D'Olive 
Geography 

110 Geography of United States 
and Canada, Bolton 

118 Geography of South America, 
Mexico, and the Caribbean 
Countries, Bolton 

135 Principles of Human Geog- 
raphy, Bolton 

138 Geography of Europe, Bolton 



Health 

27 Community Hygiene, Lowrey 
79 Personal Hygiene, Lowrey 
125 Problems of Child Health, 
Lowrey 

History 

27 World Civilization, 5000 B. C. 
to 1650 A. D., Gonzales 

28 World Civilization Since 1650 
A. D., Gonzales 

61 American History to 1800, 
Jackson 

62 American History, 1800 to 
1875, Jackson 

63 American History Since 1875, 
Jackson 

129 Recent American Foreign Re- 
lations, Wilber 

140 Civil War, McLemore 

185 History of the Old South, Gon- 
zales 

Mathematics 

31 College Algebra, Johnson 

32 College Algebra, Johnson 
35 Plane Trigonometry, Jones 

75 Analytic Geometry, Jones 

76 Analytic Geometry, Jones 

131 The Teaching of High School 

Mathematics, Johnson 
138 The History of Mathematics, 

Johnson 

Physical Education 

56 History of Physical Education, 
Watkins 

70 Introduction to Physical Edu- 
cation, Watkins 
151 Physical Education in the High 
School, Switzer 



Psychology 

65 Elementary Psychology, Freeny 
116 Child Psychology, Freeny 
119 Educational Psychology for 
High School Teachers, Sumrall 

Social Science 

25 American Government, Wilber 
75 Rural Sociology, Campbell 
128 Criminology, Campbell 
130 State Government, Wilber 

37 



The Graduate Division 



THE GRADUATE DIVISION 

W. H. SUMRALL, Chairman, 
(A Special Bulletin is available on request.) 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Mississippi Southern College was granted permission to organize 
a Division of Graduate Studies by the Board of Trustees of Institu- 
tions of Higher Learning on May 26, 1947. The Master's Degree will 
be conferred on those meeting the requirements in the field of Edu- 
cation, with emphasis in five particular fields: School Administration 
and Supervision, Secondary Education, Elementary Education, Health 
and Physical Education, and Music*. 

PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES 

One of the primary functions of Mississippi Southern College is 
to prepare teachers, supervisors, and administrators for all branches 
of public school service. The graduate curriculum is intended to meet 
the needs of teachers in the elementary and secondary schools as well 
as to provide an organized program of training for school administra- 
tors and supervisors. 

The student who pursues graduate work broadens his profession- 
al outlook and academic knowledge, receives additional professional 
training, and familiarizes himself with techniques of research. The 
student must manifest ability to collect and evaluate data and must 
be able to see the implications of his conclusions in relation to other 
fields of human interest and study. 

The Master's degree in Education will be regarded primarily as 
an extension and broadening of the professional education received 
on the undergraduate level with particular emphasis upon the fields 
of study in which the student is interested. The goal sought is the 
improvement of classroom instruction and /or school administration 
and supervision. 

The ultimate aim is the fusion of professional and subject-mat- 
ter training of maximum benefit to the particular student. 

ADMISSION TO GRADUATE DIVISION 

Students who are graduates of a Teachers College, a Liberal Arts 
College, or a University, provided the particular institution is approv- 
ed by a recognized accrediting agency, may be admitted for graduate 
work. Two official transcripts of the undergraduate record must be 
filed with the Registrar before admission to the Graduate Division. A 
quality point average of 1.5 or better must have been attained in the 
undergraduate courses. Also, the Graduate Record Examination may 
serve as one of the conditions for admission to the Graduate Division. 

Admission to the Graduate Division does not imply admission to 
candidacy for a degree. In order to become a candidate for a degree, 
the student must file application in duplicate to the Head of the Grad- 
uate Division at least one full quarter after admission to the Grad- 
uate Division. 

* Students interested in graduate work in music are requested to 
write Head of Graduate Division for further information. 

38 



The Graduate Division 



The student, in order to be eligible for admission to candidacy for 
a Master's degree must have completed at least a full quarter's work 
or the equivalent with a satisfactory quality rating, and be recom- 
mended by the Head of the Division in which he expects to do his 
graduate work. The graduate committee will pass on all applications 
of candidates for graduate degrees. It may, however, delegate that 
authority to a sub-committee if it prefers. 

Students may wish to pursue graduate work for at least three 
reasons, namely; (1) To gain knowledge in an area for its own sake, 
i. e., for the pleasure that comes as a result of mastery of materials; 
(2) in order to prepare for more advanced work in some area of 
knowledge, and ; (3) in order to prepare to do a better job in teach- 
ing or administering and supervising the Public Schools and Junior 
College of our Section. 

REQUIREMENT FOR A MASTER'S DEGREE 

The student may have a choice of either Plan I or Plan II as out- 
lined below. 

PLAN I 

Candidates for the Master's degree under Plan I are required to 
do a minimum of 36 weeks (three quarters) of graduate work in resi- 
dence study at Mississippi Southern College and earn a minimum of 
48 quarter hours including a thesis. The amount of credit for the 
thesis will be determined by the students advisory committee and may 
vary in value from 4 to 8 quarter hours. This curriculum is intended 
for those who plan to do further study toward a higher degree. The 
candidate will be required to participate successfully in seminar 
courses that will give him an acquaintance with the methods of re- 
search and an appreciation of the place and function of scientific in- 
vestigation in his field. Twelve quarter hours work is considered a 
normal load for graduate students the first quarter that the student 
registers at Mississippi Southern College, 14 quarter hours will be 
considered the maximum load that any student may take after the 
first quarters work. Less than full residence is computed by the 
ratio of course hours actually taken to this normal load. Nine quarter 
hours for the first quarter, therefore, would be considered % of a full 
quarter's residence, etc. Work taken in excess of the full load of 12 
or 14 quarter hours will not reduce the student's residence require- 
ment. 

PLAN II 

Candidates for the Master's degree under Plan II are required to 
do at least 48 weeks (four quarters) of work in residence study and 
to earn a minimum of 48 quarter hours of credit, of which 3 quarters 
must be in residence at Mississippi Southern. A thesis is not requir- 
ed. The candidate will be required to participate successfully in Grad- 
uate Seminar work that will give him an acquaintance with the meth- 
ods of research and an appreciation of the place and function of scien- 
tific investigation in his field. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS AND OTHER PERTINENT 
INFORMATION 

1. Candidates for the Master's degree must comply with the fol- 
lowing regulation in addition to the foregoing requirements: 

39 



The Graduate Division 



a. Hold a bachelors degree from an accredited institution and 
satisfy all undergraduate requirements in this institution. 

b. Application for graduate work should be made to the Head 
of the Graduate Division. If not a graduate of Missisippi 
Southern College, an official transcript must be sent in dup- 
plicate to the Registrar's office before registering. The 
complete record of the student includes the High School rec- 
ord as well as the College transcript. 

c. If the student has done graduate work elsewhere and wishes 
to transfer it to Mississippi Southern College, he must supply 
the Head of the Graduate Division and the Registrar with 
official transcripts of his work. 

d. The student must supply the Head of the Graduate Division 
with a program of his studies after he and his Advisory Com- 
mittee have outlined his work. 

e. The student who is a candidate for a Master's degree must 
file his application for the degree with the Head of the Grad- 
uate Division, not later than ten weeks before it is to be con- 
ferred. 

f. If a thesis is submitted as partial fulfillment for the require- 
ment for a degree, it must be presented to the Head of the 
Graduate Division by the Chairman of the student's Advisory 
Committee at least three weeks before the degree is to be 
conferred. 

g. The student's Advisory Committee will pass on the final ac- 
ceptance or rejection of the thesis. 

h. Two copies of the thesis must be furnished the Head of the 
Graduate Division. The first copy must be typewritten on 
20-pound bond paper and the second copy on bond paper of 
at least 16-pound weight. The student will follow rather 
closely the directions of a good manual on thesis writing. 
(Campbell's Form Book or Thesis Writing is a good book). 

i. The thesis must show independent thinking, original investi- 
gation, mastery of subject-matter and ability to do research 
in the field of major interest. 

2. No regular faculty member of Mississippi Southern College may 
take an advanced degree in this institution, but should take work 
elsewhere. 

3. Ordinarily, an undergraduate major or its quivalent shall consti- 
tute the basis for a graduate major in any field. Likewise, an 
undergraduate minor, or its quivalent, shall be required as a basis 
for graduate work in other fields than the major. 

4. Work taken more than seven years before the date at which the 
Master's degree is expected may not be used to count for credit 
toward that degree. 

5. Undergraduates in this institution who plan to undertake grad- 
uate study, and who have fulfilled all requirements for the bach- 

40 



The Graduate Division 



elor's degree except one or two courses, may be allowed to en- 
roll in certain courses with the idea of later obtaining graduate 
credit, provided the student is not registered in more than two 
courses, and provided notice is given the Head of the Graduate 
Division of the student's purpose. In such an arrangement, the 
Head of the Graduate Division will inform the instructor that 
work of a Graduate nature will be expected of the student. Credit 
will not be allowed for such work unless the instructor certifies 
that the work was of distinctly graduate nature. 

6. Teaching fellow, graduate assistants, and part-time instructors, 
whose time is partly devoted to service to the College, will be 
expected to take more than one year to complete the work for a 
Master's degree. Such students in the Graduate Division will not 
be permitted to carry more than half a normal load, and propor- 
tionally a less amount, if the student's time is occupied in teach- 
ing or assisting in any other kind of work. 

7. A minimum of half the student's work must be in distinctly grad- 
uate courses. Graduate students, however, may elect to take 
some undergraduate courses provided they need the work, and 
provided the Graduate Committee passes favorably on such 
courses. Graduate students, however, must do extra work in 
undergraduate courses, such as term papers, research and etc., as 
may be directed by the professor in charge. 

8. An average of "B" or better and no grade below "C" is required. 
From 12 to 16 quarter hours in other fields may be taken except 
in case of majors in School Administration and Supervision and 
Elementary Education. In these fields the total number of hours 
may be taken (optional with student) in the major field of study. 

9. Graduate credit from other accredited institutions is acceptable 
for as much as 9 quarter hours, provided it is in the chosen field 
or fields of the student's work. 

10. A committee of three, appointed by the Head of Graduate Studies, 
will serve as the student's advisory committee. The student's 
major professor will usually serve as chairman of his advisory 
committee. 

11. In addition to the regular course examinations a final compre- 
hensive oral or written examination, or both, may be required of 
all candidates for the Master's degree. The candidate will be ex- 
amined on his major subject and his thesis, if he pursues Plan 
One; or his field or fields of concentration if he pursues Plan 
Two. The oral examination will be conducted by a committee 
appointed by the Head of the Graduate Studies. A written notice 
of the time and place of holding the examination will be sent to 
the candidate and to each member of the committee. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

A limited number of scholarships are available. Holders of 
scholarships may be expected to render a limited amount of service 
to the College. The Head of the Graduate Division will assign such 
work and determine the amount of time expected of the holders of 
scholarships to be devoted to the work. The stipends vary according 
to the amount of service to be rendered. Usually the amount will 
range from $100 to $500. 

41 



Expenses 

EXPENSES 

Dormitory Students 

Incidental Fees $ 42.50 per quarter 

Room 18.00 per quarter 

Board 69.00 per quarter 

*Laundry (See note below) 12.24 per quarter 

Total Expenses per Quarter $141.74 

Payable each quarter on entrance $ 92.12 

Balance payable at beginning of second half of 

quarter 49.62 

$141.74 

Day Students 

Incidental Fees (Payable on entrance) $ 47.50 per quarter 

Special Students 

Auditing (No College Credit) per quarter hour.._$ 2.50 

Student taking four or less quarter hours 10.00 per quarter 

Student taking additional hours through six 

quarter hours, per quarter hour 2.50 

Students taking above six quarter hours, per 

quarter 40.00 

Veterans 

Incidental fees paid by use of G. I. Bill of Rights 
Books, Supplies and Laboratory fees paid by use 

of G. I. Bill of Rights. 
Room, Board and Laundry: 

Payable at beginning of quarter, on entrance. $ 49.62 

Payable at beginning of second half 

of quarter 49.62 

* Laundry service is optional with the student. This amount may be 
deducted from total fees if student can have laundry done at home. 

SPECIAL REFUND POLICY FOR VETERANS ONLY 
Non-Resident (Out-of-State) Tuition 

Length of Regular Quarter: 12 Weeks 
Period of Veterans Actual Length of Summer Quarter: 10 Weeks 
Attendance in Institution Percent of Non-resident (Out-of-State) 
From Date of Enrollment Tuition Fees to be Charged: 

Regular Quarter Summer Quarter 

One Week or Less 20% 25% 

Between one and two weeks 40 50 

Between two and three weeks 60 75 

Between three and four weeks 80 100 

Between four and five weeks 100 100 

Over five weeks 100 100 

42 



Expenses 



All Charges Other Than Non-Resident (Out-of-State) Tuition 

Length of Regular Quarter: 12 Weeks 
Period of Veterans Actual Length of Summer Quarter: 10 Weeks 
Attendance in Institution Percent of Fees to be charged other 
From Date of Enrollment than Non-Resident (Out-of-State) Tui- 
tion or Fee: 

Regular Quarter Summer Quarter 

Three days or less 

Four days to one week 20% 25% 

Between one and two weeks 40 50 

Between, two and three weeks 50 50 

Between three and four weeks 50 50 

Between four and five weeks 50 50 

Between five and six weeks 50 100 

Over six weeks 100 100 

LABORATORY AND COURSE FEES PER QUARTER 

Biology— 37, 38, 39, 117, 118, 119, 129, 136, 139, 140, 142, 143, 

144, 145, 147, 167 $ 3.50 

152, 153 . 30.00 

Commerce— 35, 36, 37, 66, 67, 68, 71, 72, 73, 74, 92, 114, 118, 

150, 151, 160, 174, 180, 198 3.00 

185 (Small Business Course) 35.00 

Chemistry— 25, 26, 27, 75, 76, 77, 92, 130, 131, 132, 136, 160, 

161, 162 3.50 

High School (Laboratory School) Courses: 

With special instruction 30.00 

Regular classes 15.00 

Industrial Arts— 27, 28, 87, 31a, 31b, 41, 63, 125 30.00 

Music: 

Piano, Organ, Voice: 

2 private lessons per week, per quarter $ 32.00 

1 private lesson per week, per quarter 16.00 

Strings, Woodwinds, Brasses: 

2 private lessons per week, per quarter $ 30.00 

1 private lesson per week, per quarter 15.00 

Theoretical Subjects: 

2 private lessons per week, per quarter $ 30.00 

1 private lesson per week, per quarter . 15.00 

Vocal Pedagogy— 17, 180, 181 3.00 

Piano Pedagogy— 182, 183, 184 3.00 

Violin Pedagogy— 185, 186, 187 3.00 

Theoretical Courses, per quarter hour 2.50 

Music 34, 35, 36, 64, 65, 66, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 
164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169. 

43 



Expenses 

Music Education Courses (School Music Methods, per 

quarter hour 2.50 

Music 70, 71, 72, 120, 121a, 121b, 122a, 122b, 126, 
127, 128, 170, 171, 172, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 
196, 209, 210, 211. 

Church Music Courses, per quarter hour __~ . 2.50 

212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220 
Survey of Music Literature, 43, 44, 45 
History of Music 73, 74, 75 
Music Fundamentals 95, 96 
Ensemble 123, 124, 125, 173, 174, 175 1.50 

Practice 1 hour daily, per quarter 3.00 

Each additional hour daily, per quarter 1.00 

Organ rental for 1 hour daily, per quarter 12.00 

Each additional hour daily, per quarter...^ 3.00 

Orchestral and Band Instrument rental, per quarter 6.00 

(The College owns several string, brass and woodwind 
instruments that are available to students for practice 
at special fees stated above). 

Should any class not materialize, students will be advised 
to take the course privately at special fees stated 
above. 

Physics— 80, 81, 82, 137 - 3.50 

Home Economics— 26, 50, 104, 105, 125, 135, 150, 180, 200 „. 1.50 

Home Economics Education — 185, 186 1.50 

Home Economics— 37, 85, 115, 138, 142, 197 3.00 

Reading Clinic — Complete Educational Diagnosis 10.00 

Individual Remedial Instruction, per month 15.00 

Out of State Tuition 66.66 

Late Registration fee 2.00 

Each transcript of credits after the first 1.00 

The Southerner 6.00 

Graduation fee 6.00 

Special Examination Fee 1.00 

Change of Schedule - 1.00 

Registration Fee (Required of all graduate students as a ma- 
triculation fee in the Graduate Division. This fee is 
paid once, and only once, by the student during his 
period of residence as a graduate student) 10.00 

Workshop Fee 30.00 

Workshop Library Fee 2.50 

44 



Expenses 



SUMMARY OF EXPENSES OF DORMITORY STUDENTS FOR 
NINE MONTHS 

Incidental Fee of Year $127.50 

Matriculation, Library, Athletic, Hospital, College News- 
paper, Lyceum, etc. 

Board 207.00 

Room 54.00 

Laundry (Optional) 36.72 



$425.22 
Payable in three amounts of $141.74 on — 
September 13, 1948 
December 6, 1948 
March 14, 1949 
or — 
Payable in six installments, as follows: 

September 13, 1948 $ 92.12 

October 22, 1948 49.62 

December 6, 1948 92 12 

January 31, 1949 49.62 

March 14, 1949 92.12 

April 25, 1949 49.62 

Additional Expenses: 

Approximate cost of books for one year $30.00. Music majors 
have additional fees (see catalog); Laboratory science fees are $3.50 
per course, and some Commerce courses at $3.00 per course. 

BUSINESS REGULATIONS 

Announcements concerning expenses, fees, and furnishings are 
subject to change without notice and may not be regarded as binding 
obligations of the college. In time of changing conditions, it is espe- 
cially necessary to have this definitely understood. 

Should a student withdraw three days after date of registration 
all fees will be refunded. 

Should a student withdraw for any reason prior to mid-term of any 
quarter fifty (50%) per cent of Incidental Fee will be refunded and 
pro rata percentage of board and laundry fees will be refunded. 

Should a student withdraw after mid-term of any quarter under 
no circumstances will any part of Incidental Fee be refunded, but a 
pro rata percentage of board and laundry fees will be refunded. 

Special or Laboratory Fees will not be refunded under any cir- 
cumstances after a student has been in attendance for three days. 

All students, faculty, officers and employees rooming in dorm- 
itories are required to take their meals in the college dining hall. 
Others who take part of their meals in the dining hall are charged 
per meal. 

No deduction in living expenses is made for an absence of less 
than two continuous weeks, and then only when the absence is neces- 
sary and is reported to the Secretary's office five days in advance. 
No reduction of board is made on account of late entrance. 

No lesson in music or laboratory course is given until fee is paid 
and receipt presented to instructor. 

While no deposit is required for loss and damage, any amount 
charged to a student must be paid before examinations are permitted. 

45 



Academic Organization 



ACADEMIC ORGANIZATION 

ORGANIZATION OF INSTRUCTION 

Mississippi Southern College is a four-year college. Instruction is 
organized around a core-curriculum with ample time for specialization 
by the student in his special field of interest. The freshman and soph- 
omore years are given over largely to the completion of the core re- 
quirements, the junior and senior years to the professional and major 
requirements. 

The core-curricula are designed to continue the general cultural 
studies begun in high school and lay a foundation for more specialized 
work which is to follow. The primary purpose of these curricula are: 
(1) basic education, insuring contact with the social, cultural, biolog- 
ical, and physical background of civilization and with the discipline 
and tools necessary for advanced work; (2) orientation, providing the 
students with the exploratory contacts that will enable the institution 
to assist them to make wise selection of specialization for their later 
work. Courses in education and psychology offered at the junior col- 
lege level are mainly such as should be of value to any citizen in un- 
derstanding educational problems and the place of education in con- 
temporary life. 

The last two years are devoted mainly to professional courses or 
to intensive subject matter courses. The program of study is so plan- 
ned as to provide the student with adequate specialized training in a 
chosen field of endeavor. 

The instructional program is organized into ten divisions. These 
divisions are (1) Biological Sciences, (2) Commerce, (3) Education 
and Psychology, (4) Fine Arts, (5) Home Economics, (6) Industrial 
Arts, (7) Language and Literature, (8) Health and Physical Educa- 
tion, (9) Physical Sciences and Mathematics, (10) Social Studies. 

ADMISSION 

Students are admitted to the College by (1) certificate from an 
accredited high school, (2) transfer from other colleges or universities, 
or (3) examination. New students are required to take a psychological 
examination, and an achievement test. They are also required to have 
a physical examination during their first quarter of residence, or 
prior to their registration. 

By Certificate — Students are admitted to the college upon the pre- 
sentation of an acceptable certificate showing fifteen units of high 
school work from an accredited high school. These certificates must 
be sent by mail in advance, direct from the principal of the school at- 
tended. 

By Examination — Students above high school age who have not 
had fifteen required units may secure admission by examination. 
These examinations will be given on the first Monday of September, 
November, March and July, beginning at eight o'clock. 

Mathematics Requirement — It is recommended that no student 
plan to major in mathematics or enter any science or pre-engineering 

46 



Academic Organization 



who does not have IMj units of high school algebra and one unit of 
plane geometry. 

Veterans — Veterans whose high school careers were interrupted 
by service in the armed forces will normally receive a minimum of 
two units credit for their military service. If the additional units do 
not bring their total to fifteen and they have at least four units of 
high school credit and are recommended by their high school prin- 
cipal, they may take an examination which has been specially pre- 
pared for them. Upon its successful completion cooperating high 
schools will award the diploma. The veteran may then be accepted as 
a regular college student. These examinations are given near enough 
the beginning of each quarter so that successful applicants can enroll 
during that quarter. 

Advanced Standing — Students from colleges or universities of 
recognized standing are admitted to Mississippi Southern College on 
the basis of an official transcript of credits mailed directly to the Of- 
fice of the Registrar from the institution previously attended. These 
transcripts must show that the student is eligible for registration at 
the school from which he is transferring. The student must have 
maintained a grade average of C on work which has been completed 
to receive credit. Students falling below this average must earn a 
sufficient number of quality credits at Mississippi Southern to raise 
their average to C. 

In cases of students transferred from recognized junior colleges, 
all credits earned in junior college remain a part of the students' 
records. However, specific course requirements for graduation at 
Mississippi Southern College must be met. Ninety-six of the one hun- 
dred ninety-two hours offered to satisfy requirements for any degree 
must be earned in a senior college after admission to the junior class. 

Students transferring from non-accredited institutions may be 
accepted on probation. If their work is of a C average or better dur- 
ing the first nine months period at Mississippi Southern College, the 
credits transferred may be accepted. 

Credit for Military Experience — For basic training veterans may 
receive six quarter hours of credit in Physical Education and Hygiene. 
Credit for specialized training received in service schools, through 
the Armed Forces Institute, ASTP, or Army University Center 
courses will be given according to the recommendations of the Amer- 
ican Council on Education. 

Placement Examinations — All new students are required to take 
a psychological examination and an achievement test at the beginning 
of their first quarter of residence. These tests aid advisers in plan- 
ning the student's course of study and provide a basis for exempting 
students from courses where they have attained a sufficient mastery. 
The dates for the examinations are announced far enough in advance 
to enable all new students to make arrangements to take them. 

Physical Examinations — Each student prior to his registration or 
during his first quarter of residence must take a physical examination 
under the direction of the College Physician. Physical education 
courses may be assigned in accordance with the results of this exam- 
ination. The College Physician requires all new students either to be 
vaccinated on entrance or to submit proof of recent successful vac- 
cination. The College reserves the right to require a physical exam- 

47 



Academic Organization 



ination of any student at any time. No- student's registration is com- 
pleted witrout a physical examination. 

DEGREES, CERTIFICATES AND PRE-PROFESSIONAL 

CURRICULA 

The Mississippi Southern College grants the Bachelor of Science 
degree, the Bachelor of Arts degree, and the Bachelor of Music de- 
gree. Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree may elect to 
qualify for the degree in the professional field or they may choose the 
non-professional degree. 

In addition to these degrees, the College offers curricula in many 
pre-professional fields, a two-year course in Secretarial Science, and 
a twelve-month course in the Organization and Management of Small 
Business. The requirements for these degrees and certificates are pre- 
sented on the following pages. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

(Professional) 

The following curricula are designed to meet all the requirements 
to teach in the elementary grades and the high school subjects of the 
public schools of Mississippi. These curricula not only meet all the re- 
quirements of the State Department of Education, but also entitle 
anyone completing them to a Class A professional life license, valid 
in any of the public schools of Mississippi. Requirements for less than 
Class A license may be found in State Department regulations. 

The Freshman and Sophomore years of college should be devoted 
largely to the completion of the academic core requirements. On the 
completion of two years of college work students will be given general 
achievement and interest tests. On the basis of these tests and their 
previous records, students will be advised as to the fields of teaching 
for which they are best suited. 

Students should select their field of teaching not later than the 
beginning of their Junior year, and the last two years should be 
centered on meeting the professional and academic major require- 
ments. 

ELEMENTARY CURRICULUM 

Core Requirements for teachers in the Elementary field: 

Hours 

English 25, 26, 27 9 

Engli sh 28 1 

English 75, 76, and 4 hours in speech 12 

Library Science 29 1 

Social Studies (including History 29) 18 

Science 147 and two from the following, * Science 22, 23, 24.... 12 

♦Mathematics 21 - 4 

Psychology 65 4 

Physical Education & Health (Including six hours in activ- 
ities & P. E. 149) 16 

Public School Music 8 

Art 10 

Total 95 

48 



Academic Organization 



* If through objective tests you indicate that you have sufficient 
background in these courses you may elect other courses from the 
same division. 

Professional Requirements for teachers in the 
Elementary field: 

Education 20 (For Freshmen & Sophomores only) 4 

Education 66 (The Modern Elementary School) 4 

Education 107 (Reading and English in Lower Elementary 

Grades 4 

Education 103 (Social Studies in the Elementary Grades).— 4 

Psychology 116 (Child Psychology) 4 

Education 108 (Diagnostic and Remedial Procedure in 

Reading) 4 

Education 109 (The Teaching of Reading in the Upper 

Elementary Grades) - * 4 

Education 169 (Tests and Measurements) 4 

Education 182 or 183 (Student Teaching — including 

observation and participation) 10 

Total 42 

Suggested electives in this field: Education 143, 137, 117 
One Major of thirty-six hours (from any of the major 

divisions) 36 

One Minor of sixteen hours 16 

Free electives to complete total 3 

Total 55 

TOTAL 192 

MINIMUM STATE DEPARTMENT REQUIREMENTS 
FOR HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS 

Subject Qt. Hours 

English 36 

Social Studies 36 

Mathematics 22 

Science 36 

Biological Science 36 

Physical Science 36 

Foreign Language 18 

Home Economics 45 

Commerce . 40 

Journalism 9 

(Plus 36 quarter hours in English) 

Public School Music 36 

Physical Education 24 

Bible 18 

Speech 18 

(Plus 18 quarter hours in English) 

49 



Academic Organization 



Library Science 

Schools enrolling 300 or more in high school 30 

Schools enrolling 100-300 18 

Schools enrolling less than 100 . 9 

In the larger schools instructors usually teach in only one field, 
but if you expect to teach in a small school, it will be advisable to 
meet State requirements in two fields. 

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

Core Requirements for teachers in the High School field: 

Hours 

English 25, 26, 27 9 

English 28 : 1 

English 75, 76, and 4 hours in speech 12 

Library Science 29 1 

Social Studies (including History 29) 18 • 

Science 22, 23, 24 • , * 12 

Mathematics 21 or 31 4 

Elective in Science or Mathematics 4 

Psychology 65 4 

Health and Physical Education (Including Health 79 or 125) 

and six hours in physical education activities) 16 

Total 81 

Professional Requirements for teachers in the High School 
fields : 

Education 20 (For Freshmen and Sophomores only) 4 

Psychology 119 (Educational Psychology for High School) .„. 4 

Education 113 (Principles of High School Teaching) 4 

Education 162 (Curriculum of Secondary Schools) 2 

Education 163 (Laboratory work in Curriculum) 2 

Education 169 (Tests and Measurements) 4 

Methods in Major Field 4 

Education 185, 186 (Student Teaching) 10 

Total 34__ 

Suggested electives in this field: Education 128, 116, 136 and 
Psychology 139 

Language and Literature 

English Hours 

A. Core Curriculum 81 

B. Professional Requirements 34 

C. Major Field 

American Literature 4 

Tutorial (Pre-Renaissance) 12 

Tutorial (Post-Renaissance) 12 28 

D. Electives 49 

Total 192 

It is suggested that prospective English teachers elect some from 
the fields of play production, debating, journalism and public speak- 
ing. 

50 



Academic Organization 



Spanish 

A. Core Curriculum -J. 81 

B. Professional Requirements 34 

C. Major Field 

Spanish 31, 32, 33, 81, 82, 83, 148, 149, 150 36 

D. Electives 41 



Total _ 192 

French 

A. Core Curriculum „ 81 

B. Professional Requirements 34 

C. Major Field 

French 25, 26, 27, 75, 76, 77, 145, 146, 147 36 

D. Electives - 41 

Total 192 

Social Studies 

The State Department of Education recommends a minimum con- 
tent training in social studies of forty-five quarter hours. These may- 
be distributed in a number of ways. The student must have at least 
thirty-six quarter hours in one of the social studies fields. It is strong- 
ly recommended that the electives be chosen from the social studies 
field. For a person who chooses a history major the following courses 
are recommended: 

A. Core Curriculum 81 

B. Professional Requirements 34 

C. Major Field 

History 27, 28 8 

History 61, 62, 63 12 

History 109, 142, 175, 185 16 

Economics 55 4 

Geography 160 4 

Political Science 25 4 48 

D. Electives - 29 

Total 192 

Mathematics 

A. Core Curriculum 81 

B. Professional Requirements 34 

C. Major Field 

College Algebra 31 and 32 8 

Plane Trigonometry 35 4 

Analytic Geometry 76, 75 8 

Differential Calculus 175 4 

Integral Calculus 176 . 4 

College Geometry 178 4 

Theory of Equations 180 4 36 

D. Electives 41 

♦Total 192 

51 



Academic Organization 



* Most students will need to study Math 31. For those who do not 
take Math 31, Math 36 or Math 60 are suggested as substitutes. 
Those latter courses should be taken after completion of Math 32 
and 35. 

Science 
Chemistry 

A. Core Curriculum 81 

B. Professional Requirements 34 

C. Major Field 

Inorganic Chemistry 25, 26, 27 12 

Analytical Chemistry 75, 76, 77 12 

Organic Chemistry 130, 131, 132 12 36 

D. Electives 41 

Total 192 

General Science 

A. Core Curriculum 81 

B. Professional Requirements 34 

C. Major Field 

Fifty-four hours from the following: 

Biology 37, 38, 39, 139 

Chemistry 25, 26, 27, 130, 131, 132 or 75, 76, 77 

Physics 80, 81, 82 

Botany 122, 123, 124 or 

Zoology 142, 143, 144, 167 54 

D. Electives 23 

Total 192 

Biology 

A. Core Curriculum 81 

B. Professional Requirements 34 

C. Major Field 

Biology 37, 38, 39 12 

Zoology 142, 143, 144 or 122, 123, 124 12 

Science 140, Health 129 or 136, 167 12 36 

D. Electives 41 

Total ! 192 

Home Economics 

See detailed outline, Page 121. 

Commerce — Business Education 

A. Core Curriculum (Include Commerce 55 and 

Mathematics 21) 81 

B. Professional Requirements (Plus Commerce 195) 38 

C. Major Field 

Commerce 35, 36, 37 9 

Commerce 40 4 

English 62 4 

52 



Academic Organization 



Commerce 66, 67, 68 12 

Commerce 71, 72, 73 12 

Commerce 107 4 

Commerce 118 4 

Commerce 150 4 53 

D. Electives (Must be above 100) 
The following are urged: 

Commerce 133, 134, 166 and/or one of 114, 151, 162 16 

Total 192 

Music 

See detailed outline, Page 95. 

Art 

A. Core Curriculum 81 

B. Professional Requirements 34 

C. Major Field 

Art 21, 23, 28, 32, 34, 110, 112, 113, 118, 120, 123 

124 36 

D. Electives . 41 

Total 192 

For High School Teachers of Health-Physical Education — (Men) 

A. Core Curriculum 81 

B. Professional Requirements 34 

C. Major Field 

Health 27, 79, 125, 133, 155, 166 20 

Physical Education 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 70, 151, 182, 187, 

195a-b-c 26 

Elective in Health or Physical Education 4 50 

D. Electives 27 

Total , 192 

For Coaches and Athletic Directors — (Men) 

A. Core Curriculum 81 

B. Professional Requirements : 34 

C. Major Field 

Health 79, 133, 155, 166 12 

Physical Education 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 70, lOOa-b-c, 

118, 151, 155, 182 _- 30 

Electives in Health or Physical Education 8 50 

D. Free Electives 27 

Total 192 

For High School Teachers of Health-Physical Education — (Women) 

A. Core Curriculum 81 

B. Professional Requirements 34 

C. Major Field 

53 



Academic Organization 



Health 27, 79, 125, 133, 155, 166 .... 20 

Physical Education 70, 110, 122, 140, 151, 155, 187.. 24 

Electives in Health or Physical Education 6 50 

53 

D. Electives 27 



Total 192 

For Directors and Supervisors of Physical Education for Women: 

A. Core Curriculum 81 

B. Professional Requirements *_ 34 

C. Major Field 

Health 27, 79, 125, 133, 155, 166 20 

Physical Education 70, 110, 122, 140, 151, 181, 182, 

187, 190 32 52 

D. Electives 25 



Total 192 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Students may earn the Bachelor of Science degree by completing 
the academic core requirements listed below. They must also have a 
major of not less than thirty-six hours and a minor of not less than 
twenty-eight hours. Courses listed in the core requirements may be 
counted toward the major or minor. 

Majors for this degree may be chosen from Chemistry, Biology, 
Geography, Physical Education and Health, History, Mathematics, 
Sociology, Political Science, Economics, Commerce, and Home Eco- 
nomics. 

Minors may be chosen from the above fields. Students majoring 
in Secretarial Science may minor in English. The choice will be made 
with the advice of the major professor. 

CORE CURRICULUM 

Hours 

English 25, 26, 27 9 

English 28 1 

English 75, 76, and 4 hours in Speech 12 

Library Science 29 1 

Social Studies (including History 29) 18 

Science 22, 23, 24 12 

Mathematics 21 or 31 4 

Elective in Science or Mathematics 4 

Psychology 65 4 

Health 79 or 125 4 

Physical Education (activity courses) 6 

Elective in Health or Physical Education 6 

Total 81 

Science 22, 23, or 24, Mathematics 21 and courses in. typewriting 
and shorthand may not be used in meeting the major and minor re- 
quirements for this degree. 

54 



Academic Organization 



Curriculum Leading to 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Recommended for 

SECRETARIAL STUDIES MAJOR 



Freshman Year 

Hours 

English 25, 26, 27, and 28 10 

Library Science 29 1 

Social Studies 25, 29 or 109, and one other — 12^ 

Science 22, 23, and 24 * 12 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 

Mathematics 21 (Required unless excused on basis of tests) 4 

Commerce 35, 36, and 37 and /or 92 9 

Commerce 40 4 

Sophomore Year 

English 52, 62, 75, and 76 16 

Commerce 55 (Required of all majors and minors. Prerequisite 
to all economic courses except Commerce 41, 107, 

111 and 112) 4 

Mathematics 60 (Required if Mathematics 21 has been omitted; 
may be used to meet the mathematics or science 

requirements 4 

Psychology 65 4 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 

Commerce 66 } 67, 68, 71, and 74 2Q 

Junior and Senior Years 

Health and Physical Education (To be selected from Health 27, 

79, 125, 133, 155 and Physical Education 151) 10 

Commerce 114, 118, 150, and 166 16 

Minor 28 

Electives 32 

One-third should be chosen from the following courses in 
commerce with the advice and consent of the student's 
adviser and the chairman of the division: Commerce 107, 
127, 133, 151, 162, and 167. 



Total 192 



Curriculum Leading to 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Recommended for 

ACCOUNTING MAJORS 

Freshman Year 

Hours 

English 25, 26, 27, and 28 '. 10 ' 

Library Science 29 1 

Social Studies 25, 29 or 109, and one other 12 

Science 22, 23, and 24 12 

55 



Academic Organization 



Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 

Mathematics 21 (Required unless excused on basis of tests) 4 

Commerce 35, 36 6 

Commerce 40 4 

Sophomore Year 

English 52, 62, 75, and 76 16 

Commerce 55 (Required of all majors and minors. Prerequisite 
to all economic courses except Commerce 41, 107, 

111 and 112) 4 

Mathematics 60 (Required. May be used to meet the mathe- 
matics or science requirements.) 4 

Psychology 65 . 4 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 

Commerce 71, 72, and 73 12 

Junior and Senior Years 

Health and Physical Education (To be selected from Health 27, 

79, 125, 133, 155 and Physical Education 151) 10' 

Commerce 121, 122, 123, 124, 140, 166, 170, and 172 36 

Minor . 28 

Electives 23 

One-third should be chosen from courses in commerce with 
advice and consent of the student's adviser and the chair- 
man of the division. 

Total 192 



Curriculum Leading to 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Recommended for 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MAJOR 

Freshman Year 

Hours 

English 25, 26, 27, and 28 10 

Library Science 29 ^_ 1 

Social Studies 25, 29 or 109, and one other 12 

Science 22, 23, and 24 12 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 

Mathematics 21 (Required unless excused on basis of tests) 4 

Commerce 35 and 36 6 

Commerce 40 4 

Sophomore Year 

English 52, 62, 75, and 76 16 

Commerce 55 (Required of all majors and minors) 4 

Mathematics 60 (Required) 4 

Psychology 65 4 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 

Commerce 71, 72, and 73 _._ 12 

56 



Academic Organization 



Junior and Senior Years 

Health and Physical Education (To be selected from Health 27, 

79, 125, 133, 155 and Physical Education 151) 10 

Commerce 104, 121, 127, 140, 166, 167, 180, and 189 32 

Minor 28 

Electives 27 

One-third should be chosen from student's field of major 
interest with the advice and consent of his adviser and the 
chairman of the division. 



Total 192 



Curriculum Leading to 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Recommended for 

MARKETING AND MERCHANDISING MAJOR tS 

Freshman Year 

Hours 

English 25, 26, 27, and 28 10 

•Library Science 29 1 

Social Studies 25, 29 or 109, and one other 12 

Science 22, 23, and 24 12 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 

Mathematics 21 (Required unless excused on basis of tests) 4 

Commerce 35 and 36 - 6 

Commerce 40 4 

Sophomore Year 

English 52, 62, 75, and 76 16 

Commerce 55 (Required of all majors and minors. Prerequisite 
to all economic courses except Commerce 41, 107, 

111 and 112) 4 

Mathematics 60 (Urged, but required only if Mathematics 21 

has been omitted) 4 

Psychology 65 4 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 

Commerce 71, 72, and 73 12 

Junior and Senior Years 

Health and Physical Education. (To be selected from Health 27, 

79, 125, 133, 155 and Physical Education 151) 10 

Commerce 104, 107, 134, 135, 137, 153, and 166 28 

Minor 28 

Electives ^ 31 

One-third should be chosen from courses in commerce in the 
student's field of major interest and with the advice and 
consent of his adviser and the chairman of the division. 

Total 192 

57 



Academic Organization 



Curriculum Leading to 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Recommended for 

ECONOMICS MAJOR 

Freshman Year 

Hours 

English 25, 26, 27, and 28 10 

Library Science 29 1 

Social Studies 25, 29 or 109, and one other 12 

Science 22, 23, and 24, 12 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 

Mathematics 21 (Required unless excused on basis of tests) 4 

Foreign Language (Not required for B. S. degree) 12 

, Sophomore Year 

English 52, 62, 75, and 76 16 

Commerce 55 (Required of all majors and minors) 4 

Mathematics 60 (Urged, but required only if Mathematics 21 
has been omitted; may be used to meet the mathe- 
matics or science requirements) 4 

Psychology 65 —~ 4 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 I 

Foreign Language (Not required for B.S. Degree) 12 

Junior and Senior Years 

Health and Physical Education. (To be selected from Health 27, 

79, 125, 133, 155 and Physical Education 151) 10- 

Commerce 104 _— 4 

A minimum of twenty-eight hours to be selected from the fol- 
lowing courses: Commerce 111 and/or 112, 127, 129, 

133, 153, 180, 186, 187, 188, 189 28 

Minor 28 

Electives - 24 

One-third to be chosen from student's field of major interest 
with the advice and consent of his adviser and the chairman 
of the division. 

Total 192 



Curriculum Leading to 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Recommended for 

SANITARIANS 

Hours 

English 25, 26, 27, 28, 52, 75, 76 22 

Library Science 29 1 

Chemistry 25, 26, 27 12 

Mathematics 31 4 

Mechanical Drawing 27, 28, 87 6 

58 



Academic Organization 



Social Studies . » 18 

Biology 37, 38, 39, 136, 139, 145 . 24 

Health 27, 79, 131 12 

Psychology 65 4 

Physical Education Activity Courses — 6 

Electives 83 

(Additional hours in major to bring total to 36, and in minor 
to bring total to 28) 

Total 192 

Recommended electives: additional biology, chemistry, or health; 

(Additional visual education; nutrition. Students wishing to go 
on to a degree in public health engineering should add a year of 
physics, one or two more years of chemistry, mathematics through 
calculus and a year of a modern language. 



r 



Curriculum Leading to 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Recommended for 

HEALTH EDUCATORS 



County health offices, state boards of health, school health serv- 
ices and other health agencies throughout the United States are em- 
ploying health educators for public health work. Minimum require- 
ments set up by the National Public Health Association is five years 
of college work, with a master's degree in health education. Missis- 
sippi Southern College offers the first four years of this program. 
Scholarships are frequently available to promising candidates for the 
fifth year in recognized schools of public health. - 

English 25, 26, 27, 28, 52, 75, 76 22 

Library Science 29 ^ 1 

Chemistry 25, 26, 27 12 

Physics 80, 81, 82 ^ 12 

Mathematics 31, 32, 35 12 

Social Studies (Including Sociology) 18 

Biology 37, 38, 39 12 

Health 27, 79, 125 12 

Physical Education Activity Courses 6 

Physical Education 149, or 151 or 190 4 

Psychology 65, 116, or 119 8 

Education 66 or 113, 128, 162, 183 or 185-186 20 

Electives 53 

(Additional hours in major to bring total to 36, and in minor 

to bring total to 28) 

Total 192 

A major and a minor should be selected from biology, chemistry, 
and health. Social studies and visual education are recommended. It 
is recommended that health-physical education majors substitute Sci- 
ence 37-38 for Science 22 in the core curriculum. 

59 



Academic Organization 



Curriculum Leading to 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Recommended for 

RECREATIONAL LEADERS AND SOCIAL WORKERS 

Hours 

English 25, 26, 27, 28, 52, 75, 76 22 

Library Science 29 1 

History 27, 28 8 

Psychology 65, 139 8 

Science 23, 24, 37, 129 16 

Mathematics 3 1 4 

Economics 55, elective 4 8 

Government 25, elective 4 8 

Sociology 63, 112 8 

Education 20, 136 8 

Health 27, 79 8 

Physical Education 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 140 10 

Religious Education, electives *_ 8 

Complete major and minor from health, physical education and 

sociology 48 

Suggested electives: music, art, industrial arts, speech and dra- 
matics, journalism, accounting and business ad- 
ministration, religious education 27 ™ 

Total 192 



Curriculum Leading to 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Recommended for 

STUDENTS DESIRING TRAINING IN SOCIAL WORK 

Numerous opportunities for properly trained individuals are now 
developing in fields of social work. Workers are needed in Missis- 
sippi for child welfare work, medical social service, psychiatric social 
work, supervision of persons on parole or probation, and for many 
allied fields. Other partially trained workers are needed as non-pro- 
fessional members of boards which direct different social agencies 
and institutions. 

As a rule students interested in social work should obtain a wel- 
balanced education, with courses selected from all major academic 
divisions. He should plan to obtain specialized training in advanced 
social work schools after graduation with an A.B. or B.S. degree. 

Generally speaking, pre-social work students should take either 
the A.B. or B.S. degree, with a major in sociology, and a minor in 
psychology, political science, economics, or health education. In ad- 
dition, to the minor, he should take additional courses in all the fields 
from which he might have chosen the minor. The core curriculum 
should be completed in the first two years. 

60 



Academic Organization 



Freshman Year 

Hours 

English 25, 26, 27, 28 10 

Political Science 25, 45, and History 29 12 

Science 22, 23, and 24 12 

* Mathematics 31 4 

Health 79 4 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 

Library Science 29 1 

Elective 4 

*Note: Students unwilling to take college algebra are urged 
to enter some field other than social work. 

Sophomore Year 

English 52, 75, 76 (or 80) 12 

Commerce 55 '. * 4 

Sociology 63, 75 8 

Psychology 65 4 

Elective in Science or Mathematics 4 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 

Electives 13 

Junior Year 

Sociology 16 

Minor 16 

* Journalism elective 4 

Electives 12 

*Note: Journalism is highly recommended for pre-social work- 
ers by social work leaders in the State. 

Senior Year 

Sociology 12 

Minor 12 

Electives _ 22 

Total 192 

A.B. candidates might postpone Political Science 25 and 45 until 
the junior year and elect their foreign language in freshman and 
sophomore years (total of 24 hours). 

Recommended electives: Journalism, Speech, Psychology 116 
(Child), 129 (Applied), and 139 (Social), Commerce 55 (Economics), 
and 127 (Labor Problems), Education 137 (Mental Hygiene) and 169 
(Tests and Measurements), Health 196 and 198 (Marriage), Physical 
Education 133 (Camp Counseling), History 27 and 28 (European) or 
61, 62 and 63 (United States), Political Science 25 (United States), 
45 (County), and 130 (State), Statistics, Home Economics 128 (Fam- 
ily), and Biology 140. 

61 



Academic Organization 



Curriculum Leading to 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Recommended for 

ARTS MAJORS CONCENTRATING IN ADVERTISING 

(COMMERCIAL ART) 

Freshman Year 

Hours 

English 25, 26, 27, and 28 10 

Library Science 29 1 

Social Studies 12 

Science 12 

Art 21, 23, 32 9 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 

Elective 2 

Sophomore Year 

English 75, 76, and Speech 12 

Psychology 65 4 

Health 79 4 

Social Studies 8 

Science 4 

Mathematics 21 or 31 4 

Art 28, 34, 110 9 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 

Junior Year 

Art 122, 123, 128, 134 j. 12 

Minor 16 

Elective from Major Field 3 

General Electives 6 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 

Electives 7 

Senior Year 

Minor 16 

Electives from Major Field 9 

Art 124, 158 ^ 6 

General Electives 12 

Physical Education (Activity Course) ^ 1 

Elective 4 



Curriculum Leading to 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Recommended for 

ART MAJORS CONCENTRATING IN CRAFT WORK 

Freshman Year 

Hours 

English 25, 26, 27, and 28 10 

Library Science 29 1 

S ocial Studies 12 

62 



Academic Organization 



Science ■- 12 

Art 21, 23, 32 9 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 

Elective 2 

Sophomore Year 

English 75, 76, and Speech J 12 

Psychology 65 4 

Health 79 _~ 4 

Social Studies 8 

Science 4 

Mathematics 21 or 31 4 

Art 28, 36, 110 9 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 

Junior Year 

Art 122, 128, 131 9 

Minor 16 

Electives from Major Field .. 6 

General Electives 6 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) _ 3 

Electives 7 

Senior Year 

Minor 16 

Electives from Major Field 6 

Art 124, 160, 162 9 

General Electives 12 

Physical Education (Activity Course) 1 

Elective 4 



Curriculum Leading to 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Recommended for 

ART MAJORS CONCENTRATING IN DRAWING AND PAINTING 

Freshman Year 

Hours 

English 25, 26, 27, and 28 10 

Library Science 29 1 

Social Studies _ 12 

Science . 12 

Art 21, 23, 32 . 9 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 

Elective 2 

Sophomore Year 

English 75, 76, and Speech 12 

Psychology 65 _ 4 

Health 79 4 

Social Studies 8 

Science 4 

63 



Academic Organization 



Mathematics 21 or 31 4 

Art 28, 34, 112, 113 12 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 

Junior Year 

Art 118, 120, 121 9 

Minor 16 

Electives from Major Field 6 

General Electives 10 

Physical Education (Activity Courses) 3 

Senior Year 

Minor 16 

General Electives from Major Field 9 

Art 154, 156 6 

General Electives 12 

Physical Education (Activity Course) 1 

Elective 4 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

Students may earn the Bachelor of Arts degree by completing 
the academic core requirements listed below. They must also have a 
major of not less than thirty-six hours and a minor of not less than 
twenty-eight hours. Courses listed in the core requirements may be 
counted toward the major or minor. * 

Majors for this field may be chosen from English, a foreign lan- 
guage, a natural science, geography, history, economics, sociology, 
political science, health or mathematics. 

Minors may be chosen from the above fields. The choice will be 
made with the advice of the major professor. 

CORE REQUIREMENTS 

Hours 

English Composition and Literature 20 

A Foreign Language __*. 18 ~ 

History — Social Science 20 ^~ 

Psychology 4 / 

Health 79 or 125 4 X/ 

Science 12 — yV 

Phys. Education (activity courses) _> &>$>* 

Elective in Health or Physical Education ' 6 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREE 

The requirements for the Bachelor of Music Degree and the 
Bachelor of Music Education degree are listed in the Division of Fine 
Arts, Page 96. 

DEGREES FOR PRE-MEDICAL OR PRELAW 
STUDENT 

Students may be allowed to complete work for B. S. and B. A. 
degrees in affiliated schools of medicine and law on the following 
conditions: 

(1) That three academic years of residence shall have been 

64 



Academic Organization 



completed at Mississippi Southern College, with. 140 hours 
credit and 140 quality points. 

(2) That all core requirements for the degree shall have been 
completed at Mississippi Southern College. 

(3) That credit and quality points shall be transferred back to 
Mississippi Southern College from the school of medicine or 
law to complete requirements for the degree. 

(4) That the program leading to the degree shall be completed 
within two calendar years of the termination of the last 
quarter of residence at Mississippi Southern College. 

CERTIFICATES TO TEACH 

The State Department of Education grants a number of differ- 
ent grades of certificates. The type of certificates and the require- 
ments are listed below: 

Class A Professional License — Bachelor of Science and Bachelor 
of Music degrees from Mississippi Southern College are under the 
laws of Mississippi valid as life professional licenses to teach in any 
of the schools of the state. The same law grants a five-year element- 
ary license upon the completion of a two-year certificate curriculum. 
(H.B. 396, Sec. 1, Chapter 201, Act of 1922.) 

Students who take the Bachelor of Arts degree may receive a 
Class A life license to teach if they have included in their program 
twenty-eight hours of education, psychology, and methods courses to 
meet state requirements. Practice teaching is necessary for a life li- 
cense. Students receiving the Bachelor of Arts degree may secure li- 
censes in some class below Class A if their education credits qualify 
them for such a license, but not for a Class A license. 

Class B Professional Secondary License — Good for three years, 
based on one hundred thirty-five quarter hours of college work, in- 
cluding eighteen quarter hours professional training with emphasis 
on 'secondary education, renewable on eight quarter hours work, six 
times. (Fee $1.00, payable to State Department of Education.) 

Class B Professional Elementary License — Good for three years, 
based on one hundred thirty-five quarter hours of college work, in- 
eluding eighteen quarter hours professional training with emphasis on 
elementary education, renewable on eight quarter hours work, six 
times. (Fee $1.00, payable to State Department of Education.) 

Class C Professional Secondary License — Good for two years, 
based on ninety quarter hours of college work, including thirteen and 
one-half quarter hours professional training with emphasis on sec- 
ondary education, renewable on eight quarter hours work, six times. 
(Fee $1.00, payable to State Department of Education.) 

Class C Professional Elementary License — Good for two years, 
based on ninety quarter hours of college work, including thirteen and 
one-half quarter hours professional training with emphasis on ele- 
mentary education, renewable on eight quarter hours work, six times. 
(Fee $1.00, payable to State Department of Education.) 

65 



Academic Organization 



Class D Professional Elementary License — Good for one year, 
based on forty-five quarter hours of work, including nine quarter 
hours professional training with emphasis on elementary education, 
renewable on eight quarter hours work, six times. (Fee $1.00, payable 
to State Department of Education.) 

Class E Provisional Elementary License — Good for one year, 
based on graduation from an approved high school and eighteen quart- 
er hours of professional college work, renewable four times on eight 
quarter hours work one-fourth of which must be professional. (Fee 
$1.00, payable to State Department of Education.) 

Class F Provisional Elementary License — Good for one year, based 
on graduation from an approved high school and nine quarter hours 
of professional college work, renewable four times on eight quarter 
'hours work one-fourth of which must be professional. (Fee $1.00, 
payable to State Department of Education.) 

Renewal of License — Any license, including Mississippi Southern 
College certificates, may be renewed by taking the regular student 
load during a school term of six weeks under the laws of the State 
of Mississippi and the regulation of the State Board of Examiners. 
(Fee $1.00, payable to State Department of Education.) 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

Pre-Medical 

Freshman year — 

English 25-26-27-28 9 or 10 hours 

Science 25-26-27 12 hours 

Mathematics 32-35 8 hours 

Science 37-38-39 12 hours 

Electives 7 hours 

Sophomore year — 

Science 80-81-82 12 hours 

German or French 12 hours 

Electives 24 houi o 

Junior year — 

Science 130-131-132 12 hours 

German or French 12 hours 

Electives 24 hours 

Pre- Dental 

Freshman year — 

English 25-26-27-28 9 or 10 hours 

Science 25-26-27 12 hours 

Science 37-38-39 12 hours 

Mathematics 32-35 8 hours 

Electives 7 hours 

Sophomore year — 

Science 80-81-82 12 hours 

German or French 12 hours 

Electives 24 hours 

Junior year — 

Science 131-132-133 12 hours 

German or French 12 hours 

Electives 24 hours 

66 



Academic Organization 



Hospital Technician 

Freshman year — 

English 25-26-27-28 9 or 10 hours 

Science 25-26-27 12 hours 

Science 37-38-39 12 hours 

Electives 15 hours 

Sophomore year — 

Chemistry 75-76-77 12 hours 

Physics 80-81-82 12 hours 

Electives 24 hours 

Pre-Pharmacy 

The first year of the four year pharmacy course can be obtained 
as follows: 

English 25-26-27-28 9 or 10 hours 

Science 25-26-27 12 hours 

Science 37-38-39 12 hours 

Electives 15 hours 

Pre-Interior Decoration 

Freshman year — 

English 25-26-27-28 9 or 10 hours 

History 27-28-29 12 hours 

Science 22-23-24 12 hours 

Art 25-75-77 12 hours 

Library Science 29 1 hour 

Sophomore year — 

English 75-76 12 hours 

Psychology 65 4 hours 

Health 27 or 79 4 hours 

Art 140 4 hours 

Art 75b : 4 hours 

Home Economics 104-105 8 hours 

HONORS 

Students may earn their degrees with honors, with high honors, 
or with highest honors. In order to win one of these awards a student 
must have no grade below a "C". The student must have been in resi- 
dence at Mississippi Southern College at least five quarters. The de- 
gree with honors will be awarded those students who have earned an 
average of 2% quality points on all work; with high honors to those 
who have earned 2V 2 quality points on all work; and highest honors 
to those who have earned 2% quality points on all work. The quality 
points must be earned on the work carried at Mississippi Southern 
College. 

ACADEMIC GUIDANCE 

Mississippi Southern College attempts to provide adequate aca- 
demic guidance for its students. All students who have chosen their 
major fields are assigned to the professor in charge of the depart- 
ment. Students who have not selected majors are assigned to other 
members of the faculty, but upon choice of a major, they are trans- 

67 



Academic Organization 



ferred to their major professor. Students who are pursuing pre-pro- 
fessional curricula have special advisers whose interests and training 
enable them to give the student adequate guidance. 

These advisers undertake to aid their students in the planning of 
their course of study and in meeting any other problems of college 
life. Regular conferences are planned by the advisers but students are 
urged to consult their advisers whenever any problem arises. In ad- 
dition to the regularly assigned advisers the President and other ad- 
ministrative officers are available to students who have unusual prob- 
lems. 

SCHOLASTIC REGULATIONS 

Exemption from Core Requirements 

Students may be exempt from any part of the core requirements 
for any of the degrees on the basis of attainment in the field as dem- 
onstrated by a test and by high school record. Such exemption is 
granted by the head of the department involved with the approval of 
the dean on application by the student. The granting of exemption 
does not involve the bestowal of credit; neither does it reduce the 
total number of hours to be earned for a degree. Its only effect is to 
increase the number of elective credits which the student may offer as 
a part of his program for a degree. 

Program of Work 

The programs of work outlined for students in this bulletin are 
considered the best general programs available for the attainment of 
the ends the student has in view. It is expected that all students 
will conform to the core requirements. In the case of the major and 
minor programs, some flexibility will be allowed. It is obvious that 
no program can meet the needs of every student. Major advisers will 
endeavor to see that the programs authorized for their advisees insure 
the most favorable training for the individual concerned. 

Physical Education 

Freshman and Sophomore students are required to earn one hour 
of physical education credit during each quarter of his freshman and 
sophomore years unless excused from the requirement by the instruct- 
or in physical education, the college physician, or the dean. 

Quarter Hours 

An applicant for a degree must complete 192 quarter hours, in- 
cluding the core-requirements as listed under the particular degree 
curriculum pursued, and the major and minor requirements outlined 
elsewhere in the catalog. Not more than six hours of practical music 
or twelve hours of physical education activity courses may be count- 
ed toward a degree except by students who are majoring or minoring 
in music or physical education. 

A student is allowed six years in which to meet the requirements 
listed in the catalog under which he entered. 

Residence Attendance 

A degree will not be granted without residence attendance of 

68 



Academic Organization 



three quarters and the last quarter must be in residence, except that 
a maximum of four quarter hours of correspondence or extension 
credit may be earned after the last quarter of residence. At least 
forty-eight hours must be earned in residence. 

Transfer students must take at least twelve hours of residence 
work in their majors at this institution. 

Quality Requirements 

Each grade of A carries three quality points for each quarter 
hour of credit. Each grade of B carries two quality points for each 
quarter hour of credit. Each grade of C carries one quality point for 
each quarter hour of credit. Grades of D carry no quality points. A 
student must make as many quality points as the total number of 
quarter hours earned at Mississippi Southern College. It is provided 
that high grades in institutions from which credits are transferred to 
this college may not offset low grades made in this institution. 

A student may not major in a department in which he has earned 
fewer quality points than hours. 

Junior College courses are numbered below one hundred. Senior 
College courses are numbered above one hundred. Junior College stu- 
dents are not permitted to register for Senior College courses. Excep- 
tions to this regulation may be made by special permission of the 
dean to students of sophomore classification who wish to register for 
professional courses in the Senior College in order to qualify for a li- 
cense to teach, and also to mature and experienced teachers who have 
not met requirements for admission to the Senior College. Senior Col- 
lege students may register for Junior College courses. However, can- 
didates for a degree must complete at least sixty-eight hours in Sen- 
ior College courses. 

Since the policy of the College is to require evidence of ability 
to do independent work in a student's chosen field in the Senior Col- 
lege Division, juniors and seniors who register for courses numbered 
below one hundred in any department or division of the College ex- 
cept physical education, music, natural science, and practical and fine 
arts are expected to do some research type work in addition to the 
work regularly required of freshmen and sophomores in the same 
courses. 

Hours in Courses Numbered Above One Hundred 

Candidates for a degree are required to complete sixty-eight 
hours in courses numbered above 100. 

Scholarship Standards 

Students must maintain a reasonable academic record in order to 
be continued in college. Regular students must pass a minimum of 
seven quarter hours of work with an average of C the first quarter 
they are in residence. Freshmen students who fail to reach this 
standard may be given an opportunity to stay in college a second 
quarter if the Scholarship Committee finds that conditions justify it. 
In no case, however, will a student be permitted to remain who has 
not passed a minimum of four quarter hours of work with four qual- 
ity points. 



Academic Organization 



Students who have been in residence one quarter or who are 
transfer students from another institution must pass a minimum of 
7 hours with not fewer than 7 quality credits. Exceptions to the 
above provisions will be allowed only by the Scholarship Committee 
on the presentation of satisfactory reasons by the individual concern- 
ed. 

Failure to meet the above scholastic requirements results in au- 
tomatic suspension from college for the next succeeding quarter. 

Transfer students must present transcripts showing a C average. 
Students having scholastic deficiences must compensate for the de- 
ficiency by earning additional quality points at M. S. C. 

Approval of Faculty 

After a student has met the scholarship requirements for a cer- 
tificate or degree, the question of his graduation shall be submitted to 
a vote of the faculty. If a majority of the faculty shall vote favor- 
ably, the President is authorized to grant the certificate or degree. 

Second Bachelor's Degree 

Mississippi Southern College will confer a second Bachelor's de- 
gree upon its graduates or those of any other institution of like stand- 
ing provided they complete, in addition to the credits used for the 
first degree, a total of 48 quarter hours of credit with 48 quality 
points. The courses will be chosen with the advice of the student's 
major professor. 

Calendar 

Students should consult the academic calendar, for the schedule 
of registration, placement tests, assembly, and class meetings during 
registration week. 

Late Registrations 

A fee of two dollars is charged for registering after registration 
day. No student may enter after the first day of the third calendar 
week of any quarter. No student who enters after the first week may 
take more than twelve hours, but those entering any time during the 
first week may take a full load of sixteen hours, provided they make 
up the work missed in all classes. 

Students registering for a half quarter may not register for a 
full load after the second day of the term. Seniors expecting to grad- 
uate at the end of a half quarter term must register within the first 
two days of the term regardless of load. 

Program Changes 

Students who find that they are not prepared for courses for 
which they are registered may be allowed to withdraw on the recom- 
mendation, of the instructor with the approval of the dean. Students 
will not be permitted to withdraw from a course after the eighth week 
of a quarter. 

Correspondence Work in Residence 

Students will not be permitted to do correspondence study while 

70 



Academic Organization 



in residence. Exceptions will be made to this regulation only in the 
case of graduating seniors. 

Load of Work 

The normal student load is twelve to eighteen quarter hours. Stu- 
dents who are listed on the honor roll will be permitted to take 20 
quarter hours of work during the next quarter of attendance. 

Seniors may take twenty quarter hours during any one of their 
last three quarters provided they shall not have made a grade lower 
than C during the previous quarter. 

Students who have maintained a place on the honor roll for two 
or more continuous quarters of their residence are exempted from all 
load restrictions. 

Honor Roll 

Students will be listed on the honor roll if they have maintained 
a quality point ratio of 2.25 on an academic load of 15 quarter hours 
or above, provided they have no grade of D or below. 

Absences 

Students are expected to attend all classes regularly. When it is 
necessary for students to be absent from classes, courtesy requires an 
explanation to the instructor in charge. Absences totaling more than 
one-third of the number of recitations will probably make it impos- 
sible to earn credit in any course. 

Chapel Attendance 

All students are required to attend chapel on Monday of each 
week. For each unexcused absence two quality points will be deducted 
from the student's record in the Registrar's Office. 

Examinations 

Examinations shall be held on the last two days of the fall, 
winter and spring quarters, the examination schedule being as fol- 
lows : 

First Day: 

8:00 A. M. to 10:00 A. M. FIRST HOUR classes 

10:00 A. M. to 12:00 Noon SECOND HOUR classes 

1:30 P. M. to 3:30 P. M. THIRD HOUR classes 

3:30 P. M. to 5:30 P. M. SEVENTH HOUR classes 

Second Day: 
8:00 A. M. to 10:00 A. M. FOURTH HOUR classes 

10:00 A. M. to 12:00 Noon FIFTH HOUR classes 

1:30 P. M. to 3:30 P. M. SIXTH HOUR classes 

3:30 P. M. to 5:30 P. M. EIGHTH HOUR classes 

During each of the two terms of the summer quarter the last 
regularly scheduled meeting of a class shall be used for examination 
purposes. 

No final examination is permitted except on examination days. 

A student who is absent from the examination without valid rea- 
son approved by the dean, forfeits credits for the quarter. Students 

71 



Academic Organization 



will be charged a fee of $1.00 for special examination unless excused 
by the dean. 

At the end of their graduating quarter, seniors are exempt from 
final examinations in those courses in which their class grade is B or 
above, provided they have made an average of B or above in all aca- 
demic work for each of the two preceding quarters. 

Grading System 

A — indicates the very superior group, normally about five per cent of 
the class. 

B — indicates the superior to average group, about twenty per cent of 
the class. 

C — indicates the average group, about fifty per cent of the class. 

D — indicates the inferior to average group, about fifteen per cent of 
the class. 

E — indicates failure with condition. It becomes an F if the condition 
is not removed within the next calendar year, or, if the student is 
not in residence during the year, within the next quarter of at- 
tendance. An E grade cannot be raised higher than a D. 

F — indicates failure without condition, necessitating repetition of the 
course. 

Inc — indicates an incomplete record. An "Inc" becomes an F if the 
work is not completed within the next calendar year, or, if the 
student is not in residence during the year, within the next quart- 
er of attendance. 

W — indicates withdrawal. After the fourth week of any quarter, in- 
structor is asked to indicate by WP if student is passing the 
course at time of withdrawal or WF if student is failing at time 
of withdrawal. No student will be allowed to withdraw from a 
course after the eighth week. 

Definitions 

The college session includes four quarters, beginning in September 
and ending in August. 

A quarter consists of twelve weeks. 

A "credit" (called also quarter hour, or "hour") measures college 
work and represents the credit received for the successful pur- 
suit of the college subject for one quarter (twelve weeks), one 
sixty-minute class period per week (laboratory subjects double 
length period). For example, a subject meeting four times a week 
for one quarter gives four credits. A credit is presumed to require 
from one and one-half to two hours of preparation for each reci- 
tation. (For laboratory double-period, one-half to one hour of 
preparation). 

Course Numbers have the following meaning: 
Nos. 1-49 First Year Courses — Freshman. 
Nos. 50-99 Second Year Courses — Sophomore. 

72 



Biological Sciences 



Nos. 100-149 Third Year Courses — Junior. 
Nos. 150-199 Fourth Year Courses — Senior. 
Nos. 500-600 Graduate Courses. 

Numbers followed by an "S" (as English 75s) indicate double courses 
which terminate in a half quarter. These are four quarter hour 
courses and meet twice a day. 

Numbers followed by an "X" (as Soc. Sci. 105x) indicate double 
courses which terminate in a half quarter. These are two quarter 
hour courses and meet once a day. 

Numbers followed by a "Z" (as Library Science 29z), indicate double 
courses which terminate in a half quarter. These are one quarter 
hour courses and meet twice a week. 

A "Memorandum of Credits" is a statement showing the courses com- 
pleted and credits earned by the student. Each student is entitled 
to one copy of his Memorandum of Credits and to have it posted 
and checked in the records office at least once in each session. A 
fee of fifty cents is charged for a second copy of this document. 

A student is ranked as — 

Freshman when he has fewer than 40 ho'urs. 

Sophomore when he has as many as 40 hours and fewer than 90 

hours. 

Junior when he has as many as 90 hours and fewer than 132 

hours. 

Senior when he has 132 or more hours. 

THE DIVISION OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

J. F. Walker, Chairman 
Dr. Walker Miss Hearst Mrs. Simmons 

For B.S. and B.A. students who do not intend to major in biology 
but desire a biological foundation for a cultural education Biology 22, 
37, and 38 are recommended. 

Fundamental courses are listed in groups below to facilitate 
major sequence recommendations for varied fields of student interest: 

(a) Biology 22 

(b) Biology 37, 38, and 39. 

(c) Zoology 142, 143, and 144 

(d) Botany, 117, 118, 120 

(e) Health 27 or 79, 129 (Physiology), and 136 (Anatomy) 

(f ) Zoology 140, 167, and Biology 129 or 136 

(g) Bacteriology 139 

(h) Nature Study for teacher of the Elementary Grades 147 

For students taking the B.A. degree with a major in Biology the 
following sequence is recommended: group (b) above and any two 
groups selected from groups (c), (d), and (f); a minor consists of 
group (b) and any one of the other groups plus group (a) or Zoology 
140 (Heredity) 

73 



Biological Sciences 



For the Bachelor of Science degree: 

1. In the elementary curriculum a minor sequence consists of 
groups (a) and (h) plus either Science 23 or 24. 

2. In the High School' curriculum a major sequence consists of 
group (b) above and any other two groups selected from 
groups (c), (d), and (f) plus a four quarter hour course se- 
lected from one of the other groups, except Health 27 or 79. 

Pre-Professional Curricula 

For Pre-Medical and Pre-Dental students a major consists of 
groups (b) and (c) required and either (e) or (f) recom- 
mended. 

For those who plan to become Nurses (the new health ex- 
pansion program for the South will increase the already great 
demand for nurses) a major consists of groups (b), (e), (g), 
and eight additional hours selected from Health 125, 133, 134, 
166, 175, and Zoology 167. 

A major sequence for students preparing for Hospital Tech- 
nicians, groups (b) and (g) and Zoology 142 or Botany 122 
(the student will find it very beneficial to take both) and 
Health 27 or 79 plus electives in this division to equal 36 
quarter hours. 

Students who anticipate entering the specialized fields of 
Forestry, Horticulture, or Landscape Architecture, a major 
sequence consists of groups (b), (c), and (d). 

GENERAL COURSES 

22 — Survey of the Biological Sciences. Four hours. 

Required of all students except majors in this division and majors 
in the School of Music. The similarities and differences between 
plants and animals, major biological processes, structure and functions 
of parts of animal and plant bodies, theories of creation, and practical 
applications of biological information are stressed. 

37— Biology. Four hours. 

Two theory periods and two two-hour laboratory periods each 
week. 

This course deals with the major principles of biology with the 
greater emphasis on animal life. The concept of protoplasm, cell 
theory, tissue, early embryological development, classification of the 
animal kingdom are considered. Representative invertebrates studied 
in the laboratory and tissues. 

38 — Biology. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Biology *37. 

Two theory periods and two two-hour laboratory periods each 
week. 

A continuation of Biology 37. A study of the resouratory, circu- 
latory, and reproductive systems of animals and plants and excretory 
systems of representative plants, vertebrates and invertebrates. Rep- 
resentative invertebrates, plants and the frog studied in the labora- 
tory. 

74 



Biological Sciences 



39 — Biology. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 38. 

Two theory periods and two two-hour laboratory periods each 
week. 

A continuation of Biology 38. A study of the principles of gen- 
etics and evolution. In the laboratory, a study of representative ver- 
tebrates. 

ZOOLOGY 

140 — Genetics. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 37, 38 and preferably 39. 

Heredity. The fundamental principles of heredity. 

142 — Protozoology. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 37, 38 and 39. 

Two theory periods and two two-hour labofatory periods each 
week. 

A study of parasitic and free-living protozoa, life histories and 
anatomy of typical forms. The student is required to prepare perm- 
anent mount of protozoa. 

143 — Comparative Anatomy. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 37, 38 and 39. 

Two theory periods and two two-hour laboratory periods each 
week. 

Comparative anatomy of chordates. The lower chordates through 
the dogfish will be studied in the laboratory. 

144 — Comparative Anatomy. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Zoology 143. 

Two theory periods and two two-hour laboratory periods each 
week. 

A continuation of Biology 143. Laboratory work devoted pri- 
marily to the study of the turtle and the cat. 

153 — Faunistic Zoology. Four hours. 

This course will consist of the classification, distribution, life 
history and economic importance of species peculia rto the coastal re- 
gion of Mississippi, with special reference to ecological relationships. 
The course will be based primarily upon living material collected in 
the field from marine, fresh water, and terrestrial habitats. The 
class will prepare records and keys for the identification of the re- 
gional fauna. 

166 — Histological Technique. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: Biology 37, 38, 39. 

Microtechniue for microscopic study of preserved animal tisses. 
Open to juniors and seniors and others by special permission. One 
hour lecture and six hours laboratory per week. 

167 — Histology. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 37, 28 and 39. 

Three lecture periods and one two-hour period each week. Mic- 
roscopic anatomy for general students. Recommended for Hospital 
Technicians, Nurses and Biology majors. 

75 



Biological Sciences 



168 — Biological Problems. Two hours. 

This is a course in special techniques designed for majors in their 
senior year who may need some basic biological technique as a tool 
for future research. The student will be expected to do individual 
work after advisement with instructor in charge. This course will be 
given only by special permission to hardship cases. 

BOTANY 

117 — Botany. Four hours. 

Two theory periods and two two-hour laboratory periods each 
week. 

A study of grass and microscopic structures, and physiological 
processes of the spermatophytes. 

118 — Botany. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Botany 117. 

Two theory periods and two two-hour laboratory periods each 
week. 

A study of the morphology and life histories of representative 
Thallophytes, Bryophytes, and Pteridophytes. 

120 — Taxonomy of Higher Plants. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Botany 117 and 118. 

Two theory periods and two two-hour laboratory periods each 
week. 

A study of the classification of both wild and cultivated seed 
plants, including theoretical, laboratory, and field work. 

139 — Bacteriology. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 37, 38 and 39, except for students majoring 
in home economics. 

Two theory periods and two two-hour laboratory periods each 
week. 

A general course in bacteriology dealing with fundamental prin- 
ciples, morphological and cultural characteristics of several forms. 
Protozoa, molds and yeasts are also considered. 

145 — Applied Bacteriology. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Bacteriology 139. 

Two theory periods and two two-hour laboratory periods each 
week. 

A course supplementing Bacteriology 139, with special emphasis 
on clinical diagrams by laboratory methods. This includes work with 
urine, blood, and sputum. Sanitary aspects of Bacteriology are con- 
sidered through study of intestinal parisites and water and milk an- 
alysis. 

152 — Field Botany. Four hours. 

A study of some typical areas of the coastal plain, an island and 
the marsh flora, will be made. Field trips will be conducted daily ex- 
cept Sunday. Plants will be collected, identified, and preserved in 
herbaria. These will become the property of the collector. Plant 
presses, herbarium paper, and other laboratory equipment necessary 
for the proper conduction of the course will be supplied. 

76 



Commerce 



NATURE STUDY 

147 — Nature Study and Elementary Science. Four hours. 

Two theory periods and two two-hour periods each week. 

This course is intended to acquaint the prospective teacher of the 
elementary grades with knowledge of those things that are part of the 
environment of every child, and to give general directions as to ma- 
terial and methods to be used. Plant and animal life, primarily. Espe- 
cially planned to meet the needs of the elementary teachers. 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 

119 — Alocohol Studies. Two hours. 

The application of scientific findings to the solution of a social 
problem. This course will follow, in general, the subject matter as 
presented by the Yale University Summer School on Alcohol Studies. 

129 — Physiology. Four hours. 

A study of the general physiology of the human body especially 
arranged for average college students. Stress is laid upon the facts 
of physiology in their relation to the interpretation of diseases. Health 
136 is recommended to follow or proceed this course. 

136 — Anatomy. Four hours. 

Study of the construction of the human body, especially arranged 
for average college students. A fairly comprehensive knowledge of 
the human body. Especially for students of physical education. 

DIVISION OF COMMERCE 

C. C. Dawson, Chairman 

The purpose of the Division of Commerce is to provide classroom 
instruction and work experience essential for the education and train- 
ing of qualified personnel for teaching and business positions. 

Students planning to major or minor in commerce should study 
the core and basic divisional requirements to ascertain whether they 
are meeting the conditions set forth in the catalogue. All freshman 
and sophomore requirements must be met before a student is ready to 
continue with junior and senior work in his field of major interest. 
Students should be sure they are meeting the requirements, that a 
minimum of sixty-eight quarter hours of work must be in classes 
numbered above one hundred. 

The Division of Commerce provides majors in six fields: Busi- 
ness Education, designed to qualify students to become teachers of 
business in high school; Business Administration designed to qualify 
young men and women for positions of leadership in the business and 
commercial world; Marketing and Merchandising, intended to qualify 
individuals for positions in distributive education; managing their 
own business or securing positions leading to a managership of large 
units of chain or department stores; Secretarial Studies, intended to 
train capable and qualified men and women, to enter and take posi- 
tions of responsibility and leadership as stenographers and secretar- 
ies, Accounting, intended to qualify students to do business and public 
accounts, and Economics which would give students a basic foundation 
in economic theory and qualify them to enter business and govern- 

77 



Commerce 



mental pursuits or enter a graduate school of economics and Busi- 
ness Administration. 

Besides these fields of major interest, special courses are offered 
for students desiring short courses in managing small businesses, pre- 
law and specialized work in other fields. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Mr. Dawson Miss McNeese Miss Rawlings 

35 — Beginning Typewriting. Three hours. 

A first course in typewriting which consists of a mastery of the 
kayboard including figure association, special characters, and the be- 
ginning of continuity writing. The reaches on the keyboard are pre- 
sented by the vocabulary and phrase methods as well as letter-associa- 
tions and manipulative mastery. The course is open to students who 
have not had typewriting, or for those who are not yet eligible to en- 
ter Commerce 36. A minimum speed of twenty-five words a minute 
is expected on a standard speed test based on the international con- 
test rules. The class meets five periods a week. 

36 — Intermediate Typewriting. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 35 or its equivalent. 

Intensive drill is given on words of high frequency. Speed, ac- 
curacy and efficiency in continuous writing are emphasized. Instruc- 
tion and special emphasis will be given to letters, manuscript writ- 
ing, addressing envelopes and other types of office and personal use 
typewriting. A sustained speed of at least forty words a minute on 
a ten or fifteen minute standard speed test is expected. The class 
meets five periods a week. 

37 — Advanced Typewriting. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 36 or its equivalent. 

Special emphasis is given to the attainment of speed and accur- 
acy in continuous writing; the mastery of tabulation, typing from 
rough drafts and general business forms. Emphasis is also given to 
accuracy in construction and form and a sustained speed of at least 
fifty words a minute is expected on a ten or fifteen minute standard 
speed test. The class meets five periods a week. 

66 — Beginning Shorthand. Four hours. 

This is a course in the theory and practice of Gregg Shorthand. 
In addition to the theory, the principles are applied by reading and 
writing supplementary material in shorthand with a limited amount 
of dictation and transcription from shorthand notes. Five class per- 
iods a week. 

67 — Intermediate Shorthand. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 66 or its equivalent. 

A continuation of Commerce 66, completing a study of the prin- 
ciples of Gregg Shorthand. More attention is given to dictation, read- 
ing and transcribing as preparation for the more advanced dictation 
courses. Five class periods a week. 

68 — Advanced Shorthand. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Commerce 67 or its equivalent. 
Dictation on new material at the rate of 60, 80 and 100 words a 
minute for a continuous interval of time. A reasonable reading and 

78 



Commerce 



transcription rate with a mailable transcript is required. The aim is 
to increase accuracy and speed of transcription; to enable the student 
to take dictation at a reasonable rate and to transcribe it quickly and 
efficiently. The course meets five periods a week. 

92 — Practical Typing Problems. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 36 or its equivalent. 

Business problems are introduced, and further emphasis is given 
to accuracy. Specific problems, including a variety of work, are de- 
signed to be finished accurately and efficiently in a limited period of 
time. A sustained speed of fifty to sixty net words a minute on a 
standard fifteen-minute international speed test is expected. The 
course meets five periods a week. 

114 — Advanced Dictation and Transcription. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 68 and 37, or equivalent. 

Dictation is given on new material at the rate of 100 and 120 
words per minute for a continuous period. Also varying rates of dic- 
tation are emphasized. A standard reading and transcription rate 
with a mailable transcript are required. A much greater emphasis is 
given to accuracy. The class meets five periods a week, if necessary. 

118 — Secretarial Practice and Procedure. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 68 and 37, or equivalent. 

The objective of the course is to train the student in actual of- 
fice procedures and practices including filing and indexing. A limit- 
amount of time is spent in designated offices to acquaint the student 
with office practice and procedures. The class meets five times a 
week if necessary. 

125 — Materials and Methods in Business Education. Four hours. 

A special study of business education aims and objectives, laws of 
learning, teaching procedures, tests and measurements, and special 
helps such as teaching materials for the teachers of business subjects 
are studied in this course. Consideration is given to the current trend 
in teaching aims and objectives which tend to place emphasis on the 
consumer as well as on the social and vocational objectives of business 
education. 

150 — Office Machine Operation. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 37, or equivalent. 

A course to teach the student to use the various office machines, 
filing and other equipment. Sufficient practice assignments are re- 
quired to reach a marketable proficiency on the various machines and 
units of equipment. The techniques of indexing and filing are taught 
and actual practice given in filing. The class meets five periods a 
week if necessary. 

151 — Business Machines Operation. Four hours. 
This course is designed for two purposes: 

a. To give secretarial, business education, and business admin- 
istration majors a more thorough knowledge and understanding as 
well as more proficiency in the application and use of business 
machines. 

b. It is especially designed for business administration, account- 
ing and marketing and merchandising majors who will need to be 

79 



Commerce 



familiar with and reasonably proficient in the use of machines applic- 
able to their particular field such as: Adding Machines, Calculators, 
Comptomers, Posting and Billing Machines, Mimeographs and other 
duplicating machines. Also how to use the Distaphone, Ediphone, 
Soundscriber and the other office machines as business employers and 
employees. The class meets five periods a week if necessary. 

Prerequisite: Ability to type and a knowledge of accounting. 

160 — Office Management. Four hours. 

A study of the problems involved in planning and directing the 
functions of business and professional offices; executive duties and 
responsibilities of the office manager, private secretary, and supervis- 
ing stenographers; selecting and training of office workers; selection 
and care of office equipment and supplies; a study of office plans and 
specifications; routine procedure, such as interviewing callers, report- 
ing conferences, and handling of mail and other administrative duties 
and responsibilities. 

162 — Office Practice — Work Experience. Four hours. 

This course is designed to give the student a more thorough 
knowledge and practical experience in the work connected with the 
administration and operation of a modern office: Special emphasis 
will be given to the taking of dictation, transcribing letters, construct- 
ing and writing letters, meeting callers, answering the telephone, tak- 
ing and reporting calls, and other duties connected with an office. 
The student will plan to work ten hours a week and keep a notebook 
record of his or her work; any reading on the subject and pass an 
examination at the end of the course. 

195 — Foundations of Business Education. Four hours. 

A historical introduction to the basic principles and trends of 
business education including a history of business education and cur- 
riculum building. A study of curriculum building for various school 
levels, the philosophy back of curriculum construction including the 
objectives of business education, guidance programs, both educational 
and vocational, tests and testing programs for educational and oc- 
cupational ability and fitness, also a study of the writings and views 
of past and present leaders in business educations. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Mr. Dawson Mr. Gray Mr. Harlan 

40 — Introduction to Business. Four hours. 

A study of business principles including the history of the various 
types and kinds of businesses, also the various forms of business en- 
terprise. It is a study of the factors of production, distribution, con- 
sumption, communication, exchange, financial management and rec- 
ords. It also treats of the place of government in business and how 
we operate our business individually and collectively. 

140 — Business Organization and Finance. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 40 and Economics 55. 

A study of organizing and financing a business enterprise; se- 
lecting and locating a new business; managing a new enterprise, re- 
serve policies, investment of funds, and credit expansion. Emphasis 
will be placed on forms of business organization, labor problems, in- 

80 



Commerce 



dustrial relation and business management; long and short term fi- 
nancing and office organization and management. 

186 — Business Law I. Four hours. 

Fundamental principles of law most frequently involved in busi- 
ness transactions, including contracts, sales, partnerships, master and 
servant, principal and agent, corporations, negotiable instruments, 
property, bailments, and common carriers, with the view of enabling 
business men to avoid litigation. 

167 — Business Law II. Four hours. 

A study of the Uniform Motor Vehicle Acts, the Act Regulating 
Traffic on the Highways, Operator's and Chauffeur's License Act, 
Registration Act; Automobile Liability Security Act; and the Anit- 
Theft Act and as they relate to the automobile; sales and Bailments, 
Warranties and Fraud, Conditional Sales and Mortgages, Compulsory 
Insurance and other types of liability. Special study will be given to 
partnership and corporation laws. 

180 — Business Statistics and Forecasting. Four hours. 

This course is designed to give the student a more thorough 
knowledge of the statistical data available in business and economics 
and to enable him to handle this material in such a way as to predict 
some of the more important fluctuation, in business conditions. 
Especially will it relate to Economic and Business fluctuation over 
the years and the handling of current data with the view to making 
predictions in business and industry. 

185 a, b, c — Organizations and Operation of A Small Business. 

Four hours each quarter. 

185a — First Quarter — Practical Problems in Small Business. 

This course gives the student a practical working understanding of 
the business location, organization, management and general business 
procedures. 

185b — Second Quarter — Practical Problems in Small Business. 

This course is a continuation of 185a, and gives the student a basic 
knowledge of the opportunities and requirements of a small business 
with special emphasis on financial problems, permits, tax laws, social 
secuiity laws, sales and sales management and record keeping applic- 
able to a small business. The text book is supplemented by work- 
books and other aids which will help the student in some business 
which he plans to enter. 

185c — Third Quarter — Practical Problems in Small Business. This 
is a continuation of 185b. This course deals with the more advanced 
problems of business operation. Emphasis is placed on Business Fi- 
nance and Business Administration including Unemployment Compen- 
sation, Personnel Management and practical problems of small busi- 
ness. 

186 — Social Security. Four hours. 

In this course social security is viewed as a social institution, in- 
cluding: an appreciation of the universality of the problem to the so- 
lution of which this institution is directed, the ways in which in the 
past, under varying social and political conditions, the distress precipi- 
tated by the vicissitudes of life has expressed itself; the efforts of 
men to deal with the presence of want; evidence of the insecurity that 

81 



Commerce 



led to the establishment of the present systems of social insurance 
and social assistance in our own and other countries; the development 
of the institution of social security in the United States; the various 
forms of social insurance and assistance and the characteristic with 
those in other parts of the world, and the different concepts of the 
place of the individual in society and. his relation to the state which 
the various national schemes of social insurance and assistance ex- 
press. 

187 — The Field of Public Assistance. Four hours. 

This course will cover the development of public assistance pro- 
grams in the United States, including the federal Social Security Act. 
This will be followed by an intensive study of the Department of Wel- 
fare in Mississippi as to organization, function, and various programs, 
on the state and local levels. This course is designed for those stu- 
dents who plan to enter public welfare work. 

188 — Social Insurance. Four hours. 

This course will cover Workmen's Compensation, Employment 
Security, and Old Age and Survivors Insurance. The major part of 
the course will be devoted to employment security. In such case, 
however, attention will be given to (1) the historical background and 
development in the United States; and (2) an analysis of what each 
type of insurance means to the employer and employee. Special rep- 
resentatives from each field of insurance will participate in the pre- 
sentation of the material of this course. 

198 — Indepdendent Study. Four hours. 

Each case problem will be worked out to meet the needs of the 
particular person, but will include a research problem to be written 
and presented to the major professor and chairman of the division. 

ACCOUNTING 

Mr. Harlan Mr. Tidwell 

71 — Elementary Accounting I. Four hours. 

The application of accounting principles to the accounting equa- 
tion with special attention* being given to special journals, the cash 
book and ledgers; assets, liabilities and net worth; income, cost and 
expense; the working papers, financial statements, and adjusting and 
closing entries. Classes and laboratory meet five periods a week. 

72 — Elementary Accounting II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Accounting 71 or equivalent. 

Accounting for special types of business and the application of 
accounting principles to various types of business ownership. Special 
emphasis is given to the preparation of balance sheets, profit and loss 
statements, controlling accounts, subsidiary ledgers, special journals 
accruals and deferred itenis and other accounting procedures. Class 
and laboratory meet five periods a week. 

73 — Intermediate Accounting. Four hours. 

Prerequisite^ Accounting 72 or equivalent. 

This course includes a more thorough study of accounting prin- 
ciples as applied to the various forms of business organizations with 
special emphasis given to partnerships and corporations; department- 
al, branch and personal accounting, and the fundamentals of manufac- 
turing costs. This is supplemented by carefully selected questions 

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Commerce 



and problems dealing with general and special accounting theory and 
practice. Class and laboratory meet five periods a week. 

74 — Secretarial Accounting. Four hours. 

This course is designed to give the Secretarial Studies Majors a 
general understanding of accounting as applied to secretarial and of- 
fice positions where there is no thought of the student becoming ac- 
countants or doing general accounting work. It is intended to give 
the student a familiarity with general accounting forms and records 
for Single Proprietorship, Partnership, Corporation, and miscellaneous 
accounting records which will enable them to understand the termin- 
ology and to know how to use it in their daily secretarial work. Meets 
daily. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 71. 

121 — Advanced Accounting I. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 71, 72, and 73 or equivalent. 

This course is designed to develop the student's analytical ability 
as applied to accounting problems, preparatory to the more complicat- 
ed cases presented in the more advanced accounting courses. An an- 
alysis will be made of the various phases of the balance sheet and 
balance sheet items with problems to put the theory into practice. 
Special emphasis is given to valuation accounts and accounting state- 
ments for a general knowledge of accounting records. 

122 — Federal and State Tax Accounting. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 121 or its equivalent. 

A series of intensive accounting problems based on a study of the 
Federal and State tax structure. Special emphasis is placed on the 
employer's liabilities, tax returns, rates, computation and payment of 
the individual's, partnership's and corporation's Federal and State tax 
liability. 

123 — Cost Accounting. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 121. 

This course is a study of cost systems, cost classification, classi- 
fication of cost accounts, cost ledgers and other cost records; specific 
and job-order cost accounting; accounting for material, labor, manu- 
facturing expenses, distribution and administrative cost, also process 
and standard costs. 

124 — Auditing. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 121 or equivalent. 

Theory and practice relating to the theory of the various balance 
sheet accounts, working papers, statements, consignments, installment 
sales, funds and reserves, statement of application of funds, auditing 
problems, procedures and reports. 

170 — Advanced Accounting II. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 121 or equivalent. 

A study of income records affecting all types of business owner- 
ship; general accounting theory as applied to corporations, installment 
sales, branch and subsidiary company accounting and a general survey 
of accounting for liquidation, receivership, statement of affairs, and 
the relation of accounting to income taxation, distribution of income 
and liquidating assets. 

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Commerce 



172 — Municipal and Governmental Accounting. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 121 or its equivalent. 

A study of distinctive accounting principles applied to Federal, 
State, and Local Governments including accounting for collection, 
custody, and disbursement of public funds; the classification of ac- 
counts, budgeting, taxes, cash, debt; and methods to correctly and 
accurately exhibit governmental financial facts. 

MARKETING AND MERCHANDISING 

Mr. Dawson Mr. Harlan 

134 — Salesmanship. Four hours. 

This is a study of sales tactics and methods, giving consideration 
to the psychology of selling, buying motives, preparations of sales, 
prospecting equipment, canvass, securing an interview, approach, 
demonstration, objections, closing, types of customers, qualifications 
of salesmen. 

135 — Retail Merchandising. Four hours. 

This course includes a common sense survey of the complete 
scope of successful retail store management and merchandising . In 
the beginning is given a brief historical background and an outline 
of the existing types of retail institutions. There follow discussions 
of the various phases of retailing in the order in which they usually 
arise — from problems of tactions, building and fixtures to the pur- 
chasing and pricing of merchandise. Also, the course stresses pro- 
motion and initial organization, retail accounting, ownership and con- 
trol, credit, collections, risks, insurance, purchasing and marketing. 

137 — Advertising. Four hours. 

This course is designed to develop an understanding of the fund- 
amentals of advertising, its development and functions; how to an- 
alyze a product and the market, understand the channels of trade and 
the steps in advertising and personnel. Special emphasis will be giv- 
en to the psychology of advertising, how to present advertising, what 
vertisements and advertising media. 

153 — Marketing. Four hours. 

A study of the principles, methods, and problems of marketing. 
It treats of the nature of the marketing process. It views the mark- 
et structure as a whole and analyzes marketing problems and the de- 
vices used in solving them. 

ECONOMICS 

Mr. Dawson Mr. Harlan Mr. Frazier 

41 — American Economic Life. Four hours. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with a few 
of the modern economic problems, very little attention being paid to 
economic theory. Special emphasis will be given to economics applic- 
able to rural areas and rural life. 

55 — Principles of Economics. Four hours. 

A study of the fundamental principles of economics underlying 
the present economic organization. The laws governing the produc- 
tion, and consumption of goods and services, the nature of human 

84 



Commerce 



wants and the exchange of wealth. Attention will likewise be given 
to the problems of monopoly and business organizations. A basic 
course for all economic and business majors. 

6-104 — Economic Theory — Theory of Value and Distribution. Four 

Prerequisite: Economics 55. 

An advanced course in economic theory dealing with the theory 
of price, value and the distribution of our economic income. A rapid 
survey will be given to the various economic theories since Adam 
Smith with special emphasis being given to the classical school and 
the mere important theories since that time including Kaynes and 
others. 

107 — Economics of Consumption. Four hours. 

The objectives of this course are to give the student an under- 
standing of the economic principles or laws that govern consumption 
and to present facts relating to American standards of living and con- 
sumption habits. Some of the topics treated are the definition of 
consumption; laws or principles of consumption; relation of consump- 
tion to production; harmful, wasteful, creative and productive con- 
sumption; relation of consumers and producers; the creation of con- 
sumer demand; standards of living; consumption habits; consumption 
controls; government regulation; consumer education; consumer and 
producer cooperativesproducer cooperatives. 

Ill — Economic Development of Europe. Four hours. 

A study of the economic and social factors affecting the develop- 
ment of Europe from the early middle ages to the present. These in- 
clude a study of the inclosure movement, the manorial system, the 
town, the history of politics, money, credit, capital, and other facts 
of economic and industrial development of the various countries. 

112 — Economic Development of the United States. Four hours. 

This course treats in a general way of some of the historical eco- 
nomic forces that led to the discovery of America. More specific 
treatment being placed upon the Colonial Economic setting and the 
influence of this setting upon our national development. Special em- 
phasis being placed upon the economic development of the Constitu- 
tion, political parties, social and economic thought of the public and 
the various stages and steps in our American economic and social 
development, showing the effect wrought by invention, business en- 
terprise and war. 

127 — Labor Problems. Four hours. 

The aim of this course is to present the important facts in the 
history of organized labor in the United States, to analyze the chief 
problems which affect labor organizations and to evaluate the func- 
tion of organized labor; a study of the labor problems and labor legis- 
lations and court decisions that affect labor. 

129 — Public Finance. Four hours. 

The purpose of this course is to give the reader and student a 
reasonable amount of information concerning past and current govern- 
ment expenses, also both the history and present methods of taxation 
as illustrative principles which the future taxpayer and voting citizen 
should know concerning the finances of the government. Financial 

85 



Education and Psychology 



conditions of Mississippi as compared and contrasted with other states 
will be stressed. 

133 — Money and Banking. Four hours. 

This course presents an outline of modern American banking in 
its relation to other business. It is thought best to emphasis the bus- 
iness aspect of the bank as viewed from the outside rather than stress 
its internal organization too much. Particular attention has been giv- 
en to the financing of the individual enterprise; the problem which 
must be met by the business man, in whatever occupation engaged, 
in connection with the transaction of the banking side of his operation. 

174 — Problems in Applied Economics. Four hours. 

A field course dealing with local community resources and their 
relation to the community and consumers in the areas of food, cloth- 
ing, shelter, health and safety needs. Consideration will be given to 
these resources and needs and their relationship to curriculum plan- 
ning in schools for dealing with resources and local economic prob- 
lems. 

189 — Corporation Finance. Four hours. 

This course is designed to give the student a general knowledge 
of the organization and control of finance with special emphasis on 
Corporation Finance and the handling of Corporate Securities. It 
should give the student a knowledge of how to organize and finance a 
business enterprise; market securities or select and purchase securit- 
ies as an investor. 

DIVISION OF EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Roy G. Bigelow, Chairman 

The courses in this division are concerned largely with education 
needed by prospective teachers. It is assumed that students choosing 
these professional courses possess personality and general education 
as a foundation for these studies. Students expecting to enter the 
teaching field should seek counsel and guidance as early as possible 
regarding the academic, professional and personality requirements in 
general education divisions, therefore, students may not major or 
minor in the departments of this field. 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Mr. Pulliam Dr. Dowell Miss Jones 

20 — Introduction to Education. Four hours. 

An orientation course. Its purpose is two-fold: 1. To introduce 
students to the different phases of education and psychology, and to 
prepare them for specialized courses which are to follow. 2. To help 
students decide in what field they would like to work. Observation 
in College Demonstration School. 

66 — The Modern Elementary School. Four hours. 

Consideration is given to school organization, equipment, and to 
the curriculum; materials and methods in the elementary school; the 
making of a daily schedule; new type school reports; and the person- 
ality of the teacher as a factor in success. 

101 — Arithmetic in the Elementary School. Four hours. 

This is a beginning course in teaching arithmetic for those stu- 

86 



Education and Psychology 



dents who expect to teach in the elementary school. Special attention 
is given to the problem of developing an understanding of numbers, 
teaching the basic combinations and the efficient use of arithmetic 
textbooks and workbooks. 

102 — Kindergarten — Primary Education. Four hours. 

The purpose of this course is to bridge the gap between the 
Nursery School and the first grade. Emphasis will be given to the 
importance of kindergarten-primary training as a definite prepara- 
tion for the work of the first grade. 

103 — Social Studies in the Elementary Grades. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: Psychology 116, Education 66, Fine Arts 25 and 
26. 

Place of the social studies in the integrated curriculum. Objec- 
tives and content of the social studies; areas and sequence of units; 
the selection and evaluation of social studies; units for grades 1-6 in- 
clusive. Observation will be done in the Demonstration School. 

104 a, b, c — The Reading Conference. Two hours. 

104 — The Reading Conference. Two hours. 

This is an intensive program for five days during the summer 
quarter. In the morning session, students attend lectures, participate 
in group discussions, and observe demonstration lessons taught by the 
faculty of the Demonstration School. The afternoon session is de- 
voted to laboratory demonstrations and practice, and to diagnostic and 
remedial procedures. The course may be taken for credit three times. 
Those who have had the Reading Conference before should enroll for 
104b or c. 

107 — Reading and English in Lower Elementary Grades. Four 
hours. 

The first half of the course deals with basic reading problems in 
primary grades, reading readiness, initial instruction in book reading, 
vocabulary, reading interests and tastes, and appraisal of reading 
abilities. The second half is given to the aims and problems of teach- 
ing English in the primary grades, including creative work and 
dramatization. Special emphasis will be placed on spoken English. 

108 — Diagnostic and Remedial Reading. Four hours. 

Emphasis in this course is placed on materials of instruction and 
the diagnosis and remedial treatment of difficulties in reading in the 
elementary school. Lectures and demonstrations by the instructor 
and reading and observation by students. Special emphasis is placed 
on practices suitable for typical class-room situations. A well-equip- 
ped laboratory with the finest instruments available is provided. 

109 — The Teaching of Reading in the Upper Elementary Grades. 

Four hours. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with current 
practices and materials of instruction on the upper grade level in the 
elementary school. Topics which receive consideration: present prac- 
tices in teaching reading; the nature of reading; the reading process 
in the subject matter fields; weakness in school reading programs 
which are productive of failure; improvement of reading in the school 
as a whole; special reading groups; oral and silent reading; the use 

87 



Education and Psychology 



of tests in the reading program, and planning a well balanced pro- 
gram for the public school. 

110 — Clinical Procedures and Case Study Technique. Four hours. 

This is a specialized course in diagnostic and remedial reading 
with emphasis upon educational and psychological testing and the an- 
alysis of reading difficulties. Students who enroll for this course 
will serve as clinical assistants in the administration of tests and in 
doing remedial work in the Reading Clinic. Prerequisite — Education 
108. 

117 — Methods and Material in Children's Literature. Four 
hours. 

Reading in mythology, legend, history, biography, fiction and 
poetry. Narrative and dramatic presentations. Comparative editions, 
graded bibliographies, and standard practice in building a collection 
of books for children. 

137 — Mental Hygiene. Four hours. 

Considers the fundamental principles of a wholesome personality; 
the building of desirable attitudes; the control of the emotional factors 
involved in normal mental health and the prevention of abnormalit- 
ies. 

143 — Methods and Materials in the Elementary Grades. Four 
hours. 

The aim of this course is to study critically and fundamentally 
the methods of instruction in the different elementary subjects. At- 
tention will be concentrated upon approved techniques in the light of 
research in the following fields: language arts, social science, number 
relationships, handwriting and spelling. Observation of demonstra- 
tion teaching will be made an integral part of the study of each field 
in the Demonstration School and in the Reading Clinic. 

182 — Student Teaching in Lower Elementary Grades. Ten hours. 
Prerequisites: Education 20, 66, 101, 103; Psychology 116, 
Students should arrange for this course at least two quarters be- 
fore they wish to take it, and should adjust their schedule so as to 
have four hours each day, two of which must be consecutive for work 
in the Demonstration School. 

183 — Student Teaching in Upper Elementary Grades. Ten hours. 
Prerequisites: Education 20, 66, 101, 103, 109; Psychology 116. 
Same requirements as for 182. 

518 — The School Principal. Four hours. 

This course is intended especially for principals in rural schools 
and in small and medium-sized urban schools. Consideration is given 
to managerial problems; current practices in administration of state 
county and local systems; supervision and care of school plant, sup- 
plies and equipment; office work; parent and teacher cooperation; 
school attendance; organization of curriculum, selection of teachers; 
attention given to the principal who must supervise instruction in 
small schools. 

526 — Supervision of Instruction. Four hours. 
A practical course in supervision from the standpoint of the ele- 
mentary or high-school principal, supervisor or superintendent. The 

88 



Education and Psychology 



course deals with principles, nature and procedures in supervision. 
Emphasis is put on growth of teachers in service. 

528 — Curriculum Problems in the Elementary School. Four 
hours. 

This course involves a critical study of the various elements of 
the curriculum. Emphasis is placed upon the implications of social 
life and the nature of the individual for curriculum development. 
Various curriculum procedures are evaluated in terms of these im- 
plications. 

530 — Research in Reading. Four hours. 

An advanced course for graduate students interested in individual 
and group research in methods, materials and procedures of instruc- 
tion and in scientific remedial techniques. The Reading Clinic will of- 
fer opportunity for experimental work with atypical children. 

532 — Measuring Results in Elementary Education. Four hours. 

An introductory course intended for students with no previous 
training in statistics. No mathematical skill beyond elementary alge- 
bra is required. The major portion of the course is devoted to: con- 
sideration of the nature and sources of statistical data, the use of 
numbers, the principles of classification, and the construction and in- 
terpretation of tables and charts, the criteria of good measuring de- 
vices, and the selection and administration of all types of tests. 

534 — The Reading Conference. Two hours. 

This is an intensive program for five days during the summer 
quarter. In the morning session, students attend lectures, participate 
in group discussions, and observe demonstration lessons taught by the 
faculty of the Demonstration School. The afternoon session is devot- 
ed to laboratory demonstrations and practice, and to diagnostic and 
remedial procedures. 

536 — Practicum in Reading. Four hours. 

A laboratory course in the Reading Analysis Division consisting 
of analysis of extreme reading disabilities, case typing, prognosis, 
and recommended remedial procedures. Experience is provided in 
techniques, procedures, and the preparation of case reports. Individ- 
ual Reading Clinic practice under supervision arranged by appoint- 
ment. 

538 — Seminar in Elementary Education. Two hours. 
This course is designed for majors in Elementary Education who 
are preparing theses. 

574 — The Psychology and Education of the Elementary School 
Child. Four hours. 

This course deals with the mental, motor, social and emotional 
development of children of the elementary school age. The treatment 
stresses the application of developmental psychology to education and 
guidance. Child life is considered as a progressive development rather 
than as a mere succession of stages. 

576 — Pre-School Education for School Entrance. Four hours. 

Emphasis is upon problems connected with the development of 
the whole child. Case studies are made and materials and equipment 
for work and play are investigated. Activities are planned to develop 

89 



Education and Psychology 



readiness for school. Observation in the Demonstration School is re- 
quired. 

578 — Art in Child Development. Four hours. 

Art is considered an integral part of child growth and is in- 
timately related to the social studies curriculum of the elementary 
school. Opportunity is provided for creative aspects of learning and 
for the evaluation of experience. 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Dr. Bigelow Dr. Hall Dr. Landskov Mr. McKee 

113 — Principles of Teaching in High School. Four hours. 

The aims of secondary education, motivation and direction of 
learning, types of learning in the secondary school, organization of 
materials of instruction, and teaching techniques. Laboratory work in 
this course includes observation in Demonstration School, interviews, 
and library research. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 119 or equivalent. 

116 — Audio-Visual Education. Four hours. 

Especially for those who are interested in getting acquainted with 
recent developments in the field of audio-visual machines; the general 
philosophy underlying audio-visual aids, and the practical application 
of these aids to modern teaching. This course will have as consultants 
the various agents of the State who are interested in this field. 

128 — Historical Foundations of American Education. Four hours. 

This course traces the development of some of the more import- 
ant educational problems of modern times as they have been affected 
by the social, economic, and political facts of American history. 

136 — Principles of Guidance. Four hours. 

An introductory course dealing with the fundamental philosophy 
of guidance with emphasis on methods of investigation used in guid- 
ance; various methods of guidance used in elementary, junior high 
and senior high school; occupational information; vocational guidance; 
and the organization of guidance services in the public schools. 

162 — Curriculum of the Secondary School. Two hours. 

The historical backround necessary for an understanding of the 
present day curriculum, its meaning and scope; resources for curricu- 
lum development; issues; experimental practices with integrated, 
functional, and core curriculums. 

(Prerequisite: Education 113). 

163 — Laboratory Problems in Curriculum Construction. Two 

hours. 

This^ course is a continuation of Education 162. The major fields 
of the high school curriculum are investigated. Individual problems 
are assigned in terms of the student's major field of concentration. 

(Prerequisite: Education 162). 

169 — Tests and Measurements. Four hours. 

A. study of certain typical standardized intelligence results, the 
organization and the use of informal objective tests, diagnosis and 
remedial measures. Laboratory work in Demonstration School. Senior 
standing required. 

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Education and Psychology 



185 — Student Teaching in the High Schools. Five hours. 

Prerequisites: The completion of 120 hours of college work in- 
cluding Education 20, 113, Psychology 119, and methods course in the 
student's major field. 

186 — Student Teaching in the High Schools. Five hours. 
This is a continuation of Course 185, which is a prerequisite. 

508 — Modern Curriculum Theory and Practice. Four hours. 

This course is designed to follow an undergraduate course in 
curricular building. Modern theories of curriculum construction will 
be featured in this course with special emphasis on the local needs of 
the community as determiners of curricular offerings. Opportunities 
will be given, as far as possible, for students to work out their own 
problems in their local school systems. 

510 — Advanced Educational Psychology. Four hours. 

This course is designed primarily for the graduate student who 
wishes to broaden his knowledge in the field of psychology of learn- 
ing. A resume of the general principles as given in a beginning 
course in Educational Psychology will be given. Graduate students, 
however, will be expected to do advanced work in the field and to 
conduct certain individual experiments and participate in group ex- 
periments in which controlled studies are made of the learning activit- 
ies of the individual and of the group. 

512 — Statistical Methods. Two hours. 

Laboratory experience will be afforded in measures of central 
tendency, dispersion and correlation, and in graphic representation. 
Statistical data found in periodicals and various research studies will 
be dealt with in. this course. (Seniors with 24 or more quarter hours 
in Education with a quality rating of 1.5 points may be admitted to 
this course upon recommendation of the instructor). 

514a, b — Methods of Educational Research. Two hours each. 

A course in the methods and techniques used in educational re- 
search. All candidates for a degree in School Administration must 
take this course and submit a written report at end of course evi- 
dencing familiarity with the tools of research. 

572 — Occupational Information in Guidance. Four hours. 

This course emphasizes the vocational aspects of guidance. It 
presents briefly the need, origin, philosophy and present practices of 
vocational guidance. It is designed to provide the teacher and admin- 
istrator with the sources and content of occupation information, with 
the techniques for evaluation of the information, and with successful 
methods of disseminating occupational and training information. 
Units on occupational surveys and the structure and uses of Diction- 
ary of Occupational Titles are included. Prerequisite Education 506. 

590 — Methods and Techniques of Counseling. Four hours. 

This course is designed to acquaint the guidance worker with 
the basic fundamentals of counseling and interviewing. It will in- 
clude a resume both old and new methods and techniques used in 
counseling such as the directive and non-directive methods, the coun- 
seling relationship, a brief survey of diagnostic and remedial techni- 
ques used for dealing with the problems of the individual, and other 

91 



Education and Psychology 



topics such as preparation for the interview, recording the interview, 
and the follow-up. Prerequisite, Education 506. 

592 — Analysis of the Individual. Four hours. 

This course is designed to provide the counselor with the means 
of securing, recording, and using data concerning the individual being 
counseled in the guidance program. Selection, administration, and 
interpretation of tests, inventories, rating scales, and other techniques 
for guidance purposes will toe stressed. Practical experience will be 
given in using tests of intelligence, achievements and aptitudes, per- 
sonality and interest inventories, and other devices for measurement. 
Prerequisite, Education 506. 

594 — Advanced Guidance Research Seminar. Four hours. 

(Note: The courses in guidance, Ed. 136, 506, 522, 572, 590, 592 
and 594, are being offered to meet the minimum state requirements 
for those desiring to become counselors.) 

ADMINISTRATION OF SCHOOLS 

Dr. Bigelow Dr. Cook Dr. Landskov Mr. McKee Dr. Napier 
Mr. Pulliam Dr. Sumrall 

508 — School Finance, Business Affairs, and School Property. 

Four hours. 

Topics to be studied: public support of education; federal aid; 
distribution of school funds; equalizing opportunities to children; fi- 
nancial accounting; records and reports, budget making; school costs; 
transportation; insurance; management of equipment and supplies; 
indebtedness; landscaping and beautification of grounds; operation 
and management and maintenance of school property; good house- 
keeping. 

516 — Secondary School Administration. Four hours. 

A course designed to cover the practical problems encountered 
by a secondary school principal in the course of his work. Some of 
the topics to be considered are: the daily schedule, the school calen- 
dar, extra-curricular activities, staff selection and supervision, and 
the principal's relationship to the school, teachers, and patrons. 

520 — Local School Administration. Four hours. 

A course particularly designed for the local school superintendent 
(city, county, town or consolidated district). The course deals with 
the various internal and external problems of the school superinten- 
dent, but particularly with the legal, financial and school plant prob- 
lems of the local school system. 

522 — Organization and Administration of Pupil Guidance. Four 
hours. 

The course stresses the administrative relationships involved in, 
instituting and maintaining guidance programs in the public school, 
institutions of higher learning, and other social agencies. It is pri- 
marily a course for superintendents, principals, teachers, counsellors 
and others who have the responsibility of guidance in the public 
schools. The course deals with principles and techniques for the 
formulation and evaluation of a complete guidance program including" 
inventories, counseling, placement and follow-up. Prerequisite: Edu- 
cation 506. 

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Education and Psychology 



526 — Supervision of Instruction. Four hours. 

A practical course in, supervision from the standpoint of the ele- 
mentary or high-school principal, supervisor or superintendent. The 
course deals with principles, nature and procedures in supervision. 
Emphasis is put on growth of teachers in service. 

570 — Problems Relating To Education in Rural Areas. Four 
hours. 

The following problems and topics will be studied: Aims and 
functions of the school in relation to the community; school law; loca- 
tion and planning of buildings; transportation; selection of teachers; 
salaries, tenure; classification of pupils; records and reports; the 
junior high school; the curriculum; student activities; publicity; the 
Parent-Teacher Association; and other problems related primarily 
to rural areas. 

FOUNDATION COURSES 
(For All Graduate Students in Education) 

500 — Educational Research. Two hours. 

A self-directed course in some of the techniques of educational 
research. Library card catalogue, searching for headings, reference 
books of value to educators, the Education Index, professional period- 
icals, NEA publications, U. S. Office of Educations publications, mak- 
ing a bibliography, evaluation of books, and many other topics are 
covered in this course. 

502 — Organization and Administration of Public Education. Two 

hours. 

This is a background course in the structure and administration 
of education on a national, state, county, and local basis. This course 
is designed to give fundamental principles and general survey of the 
field of Educational Administration to teachers, principals, and admin- 
istrators. Required of all graduate students. 

504 — Foundations in American Education. Two hours. 

This brief survey of the philosophies, psychologies, and the basic 
history of American Education is intended to give the student a fun- 
damental understanding of more specialized courses in these three 
educational fields. Required of all graduate students. 

506 — Fundamentals of Guidance. Two hours. 

A brief survey of vocational and educational guidance practices 
is given in this course. It is intended to give teachers and adminis- 
trators a fundamental understanding of the role of guidance in our 
public school programs. It is an introduction to two other guidance 
courses available and is required of all graduate students. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Mr. Freeny Dr. Dowell Dr. Sumrall 

65 — Elementary Psychology. Four hours. 

A course in which the customary topics of adult human psychol- 
ogy are studied. Readings and discussions. A core requirement for all 
degrees. 

116 — Child Psychology. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 65. 

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Education and Psychology 



A course which studies genetically the child's various capacities 
and tendencies from their innate beginning up to their complicated 
manifestations in late childhood. 

119 — Educational Psychology for High School Teachers. Four 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 65. 

This course covers the general principles of psychology as applied 
to the education of high school pupils. Important aspects of adolescent 
psychology and educational psychology. 

129 — Applied Psychology. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 65. 

A study of psychological principles in their relations and appli- 
cations to various important human problems and activities such as 
advertising, selling, personnel management, law, medicine, etc. 

Special emphasis will be placed upon matters of vocational apti- 
tudes and interests in relation to the various types of occupational 
and professional requirements toward a better matching up of capacit- 
ies with needs, and through that to a happier and more successful liv- 
ing. 

By special permission, students who have had Elementary Psy- 
chology may take this course in lieu of either Psychology 116 or 119. 

139 — Social Psychology. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 65. 

In this course man will be considered in his social inclinations and 
relationships — his reactions to and his influence upon others. The fol- 
lowing questions will be studied: customs, social interactions, crowd 
behavior, propaganda, etc. 

188 — Experimental Educational Psychology. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: Psychology 65 and 119. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the 
nature of actual investigations of school problems and to give him 
command of the basic methods and means, through actual practice, of 
conducting such investigations. 



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DIVISION OF FINE ARTS 

Frank Earl Marsh, Jr., Chairman 

MUSIC 

Mr. Marsh, Mrs. Baylis, Mr. Blackwelder, Miss Brady, Miss DeLano, 

Miss Eason, Mr. Flexman, Miss Hill, Mr. Hruby, Mr. Huck, 

Mr. Hutchins, Miss McDonald, Mr. Saetre, Miss Womble 

The Mississippi Southern College is a member of the National 
Association of Schools of Music and is accredited by that organiza- 
tion. The requirements for entrance and for graduating are in ac- 
cordance with the published regulations of the National Association of 
Schools of Music. 

The Department of Music was organized for a four-fold purpose: 
(1) To combine musical and literary studies as a broad basis for reg- 
ular college work; (2) to use the art of music as a means of intellect- 
ual, aesthetic, and moral culture; (3) to furnish instruction to special 
and general students; (4) to train vocal and instrumental supervisors 
of music. 

Admission 

First, as a regular student. For any curriculum leading to a degree, 
the student must satisfy the entrance requirements of the College. 

Students entering the piano, voice, violin, violoncello, organ or 
harp course must give evidence that the preparatory course in piano, 
voice, violin, or violoncello has been completed. 

Freshmen must take entrance examinations in Elementary Theory. 
Those passing may enroll in the regular required courses. Students 
who have had preparatory work and cannot pass the examination may 
also enroll for the regular required courses, but must do two hours of 
supervised work each week without credit in elementary theory until 
the entrance requirements are satisfactorily fulfilled. 

Second, as a special student. In this case the student may elect any 
course his previous training has qualified him to pursue with 
profit. 

The curricula include systematic and progressive instruction in 
theory, history and practice of the arts to which they severally re- 
late; also in those branches of language, philosophy, history, and 
criticism which bear most directly upon these arts, and without a 
knowledge of which success in the higher domain of arts is impos- 
sible. 

Students desiring to major in music should register for the Bache- 
lor of Music degree with piano, church music and organ, voice, violin, 
violoncello, harp, or musical composition as a major or for the Bache- 
lor of Music Education degree with vocal music education or instru- 
mental music education as a major. However, any student of the 
college not registered for a music degree may pursue such courses in 
the Department of Music as he wishes by paying the required fee. 

Music majors who have taken music courses under private in- 
struction or in such way as not to receive credit may be excused from 

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required courses in the music curriculum on the basis of tests of pro- 
ficiency. 

I. The Curriculum in Piano 

The best principles of modern piano technique form the basis 
of teaching in this department. The student is thoroughly grounded 
in the classics, including Bach's Inventions and Well-Tempered Clavi- 
chord with Hanon, Czerny, Clementi, Chopin and Liszt Etudes, So- 
natas by Mozart and Beethoven, and selections from the compositions 
of the best composers of the classic, romantic, and modern schools of 
composition. 

In the junior and senior years of the course, concertos by Mendels- 
shon, Beethoven, Chopin, Grieg, Schumann, Liszt, and modern com- 
posers are studied and performed. Students to rank as freshmen must 
show that they have had equivalent of four years of serious study of 
the piano. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Music must be prepared 
to present recitals selected from composers of the classic, romantic, 
and modern schools in their junior and senior years. 

II. The Curriculum in Voice 

The Department of Music recognizes the need of thorough funda- 
mental training in the technique of singing as a prerequisite of the 
study of songs. The course of instruction is based upon the principles 
of the Italian School of Singing. 

Attention is given to the study of breath control, voice placing, 
tone production, vowel formation, the development of resonance, 
range, flexibility, tone color, and style. Song literature of the classic 
and modern schools is given to build an adequate repertoire, as well 
as to enrich and broaden the musical experience and appreciation of 
the student. Upon graduation the student must possess a repertoire 
of recitatives and arias from the standard oratorios, representative 
operatic arias as well as a repertoire of songs from the English, 
French, Italian and German schools. Students to be classified as 
freshmen in the vocal degree course must show by examination that 
they have the technical and musical development equivalent to one 
year of vocal study as well as preparatory piano. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Music must be prepared 
to present recitals of standard songs and arias selected from the class- 
ic and modern schools of composition in their junior and senior years. 

III. The Curriculum in Violin 

It is the aim of the Violin Department to offer instruction that 
will thoroughly train the student to meet the demands of the orches- 
tra and concert violinist as well as to prepare for the field of teach- 
ing. Throughout the course careful attention is given to the develop- 
ment of technique, musical style, interpretation, and musicianship. 
Special emphasis is placed on ensemble in advanced classes. 

The material studied is selected according to the individual needs 
of the student from the following studies: Sevcik, Leonard, Kayser, 
Mazas, Schradieck, Kreutzer, Rode and others. For the development 

96 



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of style and interpretation sonatas by Tartini, Nardini, Handel, Hay- 
dn and Bach are used, and concertos by Viotti, Rode, DeBeriot, 
Mendelssohn and Wieniawski. For graduation, selections are made 
from concertos by Beethoven, Bruch, Mendelssohn, Vieuxtemps, and 
others of equal difficulty, and miscellaneous compositions from Pag- 
anini, Sarasate, Wieniawski, Hubay, and representative modern com- 
posers. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Music must be prepared 
to present a recital from composers of the classic, romantic, and mod- 
ern schools in their junior and senior years. 

IV. The Curriculum in Violoncello 

The aims of this division are the same as those of the Violin di- 
vision. 

The material studied is selected according to the individual needs 
of the student from the following studies: Dotzauer, Grutzmacher, 
Duport, Popper, and Piatti. For development of style and interpreta- 
tion sonatas by Coverette, Locatelli and Boccherini, and suites for 
Violoncello alone by J. S. Bach, and Concertos by Romberg, Davidoff, 
Servais, Popper, Golterman, Saint-Saens, Lalo, Haydn, Dvorak, 
D'Albert, and Schumann. Concert pieces by Tchaikowsky, Davidoff, 
Popper and Boellman. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Music must be prepared 
to present a recital of selected composers of the classic, romantic and 
modern schools in their junior and senior years. 

V. The Curriculum in Composition 

, This course offers special study in the practical writing of original 
works for instruments or voice, including the larger forms such as the 
Sonata-Allegro form, Variations, Art songs, Anthems, and other forms 
of freer content. 

The latest developments distinctive of modern harmony, the var- 
ious melodic, and rhythmic idioms of the present day are made avail- 
able to the student through discussion and practical use. 

The course in Advanced Composition is given by private instruc- 
tion only, and is designed for the talented student who is especially 
qualified to enter the field of musical composition. 

VI. The Curriculum in Music Education 

The teaching of music in the public schools is now considered the 
work of a specialist of broad training. The importance of laying a 
thorough musical foundation in the grades is generally recognized and 
calls for great ability in the teacher of music. In the high school, 
music is now accorded a place of importance, and the demand for 
teachers who can organize and direct choral, instrumental, theoretical, 
and appreciation courses is increasing from year to year. 

The courses in public school music supervision are designed to 
give not only thorough and practical training in music pedagogy but 
also adequate preparation in practical and theoretical music, psychol- 
ogy, education and cultural subjects. 

97 



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The degree of Bachelor of Music Education is offered upon com- 
pletion of four-year curriculum. There is an increasing demand for 
supervisors of music and junior and senior high school music teachers 
holding the Bachelor's degree. This course offering a degree com- 
bining music and education is planned to meet this demand in the 
field of music education. 

VII. The Curriculum in Church Music and Organ 

The organ course is designed to provide a thorough and suffici- 
ent education for both the concert and the church fields, the latter 
being particularly stressed. It includes a fundamental study of the 
manual touch, pedal technique, the independence of the hands and 
feet, and elementary and advanced registration. The earlier literature 
is designed for the special needs of the individual student, and includ- 
es technical studies, the short preludes and fugues of Bach, the chor- 
al preludes, etc. 

VIII. The Curriculum in Harp 

The department aims to develop a sound and flexible technique, 
an acceptable repertorie chosen from the standard compositions for 
harp, and to give thorough experience in solo, ensemble, and orchestral 
playing. Texts used are Methods for the Harp, Carlos Salzedo and 
Modern Study of the Harp by Carlos Salzedo. 

PIANO MAJOR 

(Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music) 

Freshman Year 

Piano 25a, 26a, 27a (two lessons a week) 3 3 3 

Theory 34, 35, 36 (Including Keyboard Harmony) 3 3 3 

Sight Singing 37a, 38a, 39a 111 

Ear Training 37b, 38b, 39b 2 2 2 

Survey of Music Literature 43, 44, 45 3 3 3 

Chorus 20 1 , 202, 20 3 111 

English 25, 26, 27, 28 3 3 3 

Sophomore Year 

Piano 55a, 56a, 57a (two lessons a week) 3 3 3 

Theory 64, 65, 66 (Including Keyboard Harmony) 3 3 3 

Sight Singing 67a, 68a, 69a 111 

Ear Training 67b, 68b, 69b 111 

History of Music 73, 74, 75 3 3 3 

Chorus 50i, 502> 5Q.3 111 

English 75, 76 4 4 

Psychology 65 _ 4 

Junior Year 

Piano 105a, 106a, 107a (two lessons a week) 4 4 4 

Theory 114, 115, 116 (Harmonic and Form Analysis) 2 2 2 

Theory 117, 118, 119 (Counterpoint) 2 2 2 

Ensemble 123, 124, 125 2 2 2 

Chorus 1001, ioo2, lOO 3 111 

Foreign Language (French or German) 444 

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Senior Year 

Piano 155a, 156a, 157a (two lessons a week) 4 4 4 

Theory 164, 165, 166 (Composition) 2 2 2 

Theory 167, 168, 169 (Orchestration) 2 2 2 

Ensemble 173, 174, 175 2 2 2 

Piano Pedagogy 182, 183, 184 2 2 2 

Chorus 1501, 1502, 1503 111 

Psychology 119 4 

Education 113 4 

E due ati on 1 69 4 

VIOLIN MAJOR 

(Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music) 

Freshman Year 

Violin 31a, 32a, 33a, (two lessons a week) 3 3 3 

Theory 34, 35, 36 (Including Keyboard Harmony) 3 3 3 

Sight Singing 37a, 38a, 39a 111 

Ear Training 37b, 38b, 39b 2 2 2 

Survey of Music Literature 43, 44, 45 3 3 3 

Orchestra 21*, 212, 2 13 111 

English 25, 26, 27, 28 * 3 3 3 

Sophomore Year 

Violin 61a, 62a, 63a (two lessons a week) 3 3 3 

Theory 64, 65, 66 (Including Keyboard Harmony) 3 3 3 

Sight Singing 67a, 68a, 69a „_., 111 

Ear Training 67b, 68b, 69ib 111 

History of Music 73, 74, 75 3 3 3 

Orchestra 51 1 , 51 2 , 513 1 1 1 

English 75, 76 4 4 

Psychology 65 4 

Junior Year 

Violin Ilia, 112a, 113a (two lessons a week) 4 4 4 

Theory 114, 115, 116 (Harmonic and Form Analysis) 2 2 2 

Theory 117, 118, 119 (Counterpoint) 2 2 2 

Elective 2 2 2 

Orchestra 101*, 101 2 , 1013 111 

Foreign Language (French or German) 4 4 4 

Senior Year 

Violin 161a, 162a, 163a (two lessons a week) 4 4 4 

Theory 164, 165, 166 (Composition) 2 2 2 

Theory 167, 168, 169 (Orchestration) 2 2 2 

Ensemble 173, 174, 175 2 2 2 

Violin Pedagogy 185, 186, 187 2 2 2 

Orchestra 151 1 , 151 2 , 1513 111 

Psychology 119 4 

Education 113 4 

Education 169 4 

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VIOLONCELLO MAJOR 

(Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music) 

Freshman Year 

Violoncello_22a, 23a, 24a (two lessons a week) 3 3 3 

Theory 34, 35, 36 (Including Keyboard Harmony) 3 3 3 

Sight Singing 37a, 38a, 39a 111 

Ear Training 37b, 38b, 39b 2 2 2 

Survey of Music Literature 43, 44, 45 3 3 3 

Orchestra 21 1 , 21 2 , 213 111 

English 25, 26, 27, 28 3 3 3 

Sophomore Year 

Violoncello 52a, 53a, 54a (two lessons a week) 3 3 3 

Theory 64, 65, 66 (Including Keyboard Harmony) 3 3 3 

Sight Singing 67a, 68a, 69a 111 

Ear Training 67b, 68b, 69b 111 

History of Music 73, 74, 75 3 3 3 

Orchestra 51 1 , 51 2 , 513 111 

English 75, 76 4 4 

Psychology 65 4 

Junior Year 

Violoncello 102a, 103a, 104a (two lessons a week) 4 4 4 

Theory 114, 115, 116 (Harmonic and Form Analysis) 2 2 2 

Theory 117, 118, 119, (Counterpoint) 2 2 2 

Music Elective 2 2 2 

Orchestra 101 1 , 101 2 , 101 3 111 

Foreign Language (French or German) 4 4 4 

Senior Year 

Violoncello 152a, 153a, 154a (two lessons a week) 4 4 4 

Theory 164, 165, 166 (Composition) 2 2 2 

Theory 167, 168, 169 (Orchestration) 2 2 2 

Ensemble 173, 174, 175 2 2 2 

Music Elective 2 2 2 

Orchestra 1511, 151 2 , 1513 111 

Psychology 119 + 4 

Education 113 4 

Education 169 * 4 

VOICE MAJOR 

(Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music) 

Freshman Year 

Voice 28a, 29a, 30a (two lessons a week) 2 2 2 

Piano 25b, 26b, 27b (one lesson a week) 111 

Theory 34, 35, 36 (Including Keyboard Harmony) 3 3 3 

Sight Singing 37a, 38a, 39a 111 

Ear Training 37b, 38b, 39b 2 2 2 

Survey of Music Literature 43, 44, 45 „_.. 3 3 3 

Chorus 20 1 , 20 2 , 20 3 __ 111 

English 25, 26, 27, 28 3 3 3 

100 



Fine Arts 



Sophomore Year 

Voice 58a, 59a, 60a (two lessons a week) 2 2 2 

Piano 55b, 56b, 57b (one lesson a week) 111 

Theory 64, 65, 66 (Including Keyboard Harmony) 3 3 3 

Sight Singing 67a, 68a, 69a 111 

Ear Training 67b, 68b, 69b 111 

History of Music 73, 74, 75 3 3 3 

Chorus 50 1 , 50 2 , 5(P 1 1 1 

English 75, 76 4 4 

Psychology 65 4 

Junior Year 

Voice 108a, 109a, 110a (two lessons a week) 4 4 4 

Theory 114, 115, 116 (Harmonic and Form Analysis) 2 2 2 

Theory 117, 118, 119 (Counterpoint) 2 2 2 

Conducting 126, 127, 128 2 2 2 

Chorus 1001, 10 Q2, 10 n3 111 

French 4 4 4 

Senior Year 

Voice 158a, 159a, 160a (two lessons a week) 4 4 4 

Theory 164, 165, 166 (Composition) 2 2 2 

Theory 167, 168, 169 (Orchestration) 2 2 2 

Diction 176, 177, 178 2 2 2 

Vocal Pedagogy 179, 180, 181 2 2 2 

Chorus 1501, 1502, 150 3 111 

German 4 4 4 

COMPOSITION MAJOR 

(Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music) 
Freshman Year 

Applied Music (Piano) 2 2 2 

Theory 64, 65, 66 (Including Keyboard Harmony) 3 3 3 

Sight Singing 67a, 68a, 69a 111 

Ear Training 67b, 68b, 69b 111 

Survey of Music Literature 43, 44, 45 3 3 3 

Music Elective 2 2 2 

Chorus 20i, 2 3 , 20 3 111 

English 25, 26, 27, 28. 3 3 3 

Sophomore Year 

Applied Music (Piano) 2 2 2 

Theory 114, 115, 116 (Harmonic and Form Analysis) 2 2 2 

Theory 114, 118, 119 (Counterpoint) 2 2 2 

History of Music 73, 74, 75 3 3 3 

Instrumental Class (Strings) 170 2 

Instrumental Class (Woodwinds) 171 2 

Instrumental Class (Brasses) 172 2 

Chorus 50i, 592, 593 111 

English 75, 76 4 4 

Psychology 65 4 

101 



Fine Arts 



Junior Year 

Applied Music (Piano) 2 2 2 

Theory 164, 165, 166 (Composition) 2 2 2 

Theory 167, 168, 169 (Orchestration) 2 2 2 

Theory 197, 198, 199 (Advanced Counterpoint) 2 2 2 

Conducting 126, 127, 128 2 2 2 

Chorus 100 1 , 100 2 , lOtP 111 

French 4 4 4 

Senior Year 

Applied Music (Piano) 2 2 2 

Theory 200, 201, 202 (Advanced Composition) 2 2 2 

Theory 203, 204, 205 (Advanced Orchestration) 2 2 2 

Advanced Conducting and Score Reading 194, 195, 196 2 2 2 

History of Music 206, 207, 208 3 3 3 

Chorus 1501, 1502, 150^ 111 

German 4 4 4 

Students entering the course in Musical Composition as a major 
must pass examinations in four years of preparatory piano, freshman 
sight singing and ear training 37ab, 38ab, 39ab and freshman harmony 
34, 35, 36. Advanced Composition, Advanced Orchestration and Ad- 
vanced Counterpoint will be taught privately. 

MUSIC EDUCATION MAJOR 

(Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music Education) 

Freshman Year 

Piano 25c, 26c, 27c (two lessons a week) 2 2 2 

Voice 28b, 29b, 30b (one lesson a week) 111 

Theory 34, 35, 36 (Including Keyboard Harmony) 3 3 3 

Sight Singing 37a, 38a, 39a 111 

Ear Training 37b, 38b, 39b 2 2 2 

Survey of Music Literature 43, 44, 45 3 3 3 

Chorus 20 1 , 202, 2 0^ 111 

English 25, 26, 27, 28 3 3 3 

Sophomore Year 

Piano 55b, 56b, 57b (one lesson a week) 111 

Voice 58b, 59b, 60b (one lesson a week) 111 

Theory 64, 65, 66 (Including Keyboard Harmony) 3 3 3 

Sight Singing 67a, 68a, 69a 111 

Ear Training 67b, 68b, 69b * 111 

Music Education 70, 71, 72 (School Music) 2 2 2 

History of Music 73, 74, 75 3 3 3 

Chorus 50i, 502, 5 n3 111 

English 75, 76 4 4 

Psychology 65 4 

Junior Year 

Piano 105b, 106b, 107b (one lesson a week) 111 

Voice 108b, 109b, 110b (one lesson a week) 111 

Theory 114, 115, 116 (Harmonic and Form Analysis) 2 2 2 

Theory 117, 118, 119 (Counterpoint) 2 2 2 

Music Education 120, 121a, 122a (School Music) 2 2 2 

Conducting 126, 127, 128 2 2 2 

102 



Fine Arts 



Chorus 100 1 , 100 2 , 100^ 1 1 1 

Health 79 4 

Social Studies 4 4 

Senior Year 

Piano 155;b, 156b, 157b (one lesson a week) 111 

Voice 158b, 159b, 160b (one lesson a week) 111 

Theory 167, 168, 169 (Orchestration) 2 2 2 

Instrumental Class (Strings) 170 2 

Instrumental Class (Woodwinds) 171 2 

Instrumental Class (Brasses) 172 2 

Chorus 1501, 150 2 ) i 5 ()3 111 

Psychology 119 - - 4 

Education 113 4 

Education 169 4 

Education 186 5 

Education 185 5 

Science 23 4 

INSTRUMENTAL SUPERVISOR'S CURRICULUM 

(Minor in a String Instrument) 
(Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Music Education) 

Freshman Year 

Violin (or other string Instrument) 31b, 32b, 33b 111 

Piano 25c, 26c, 27c (two lessons a week) 2 2 2 

Theory 34, 35, 36 (Including Keyboard Harmony) 3 3 3 

Sight Singing 37a, 38a, 39a 111 

Ear Training 37b, 38b, 39b 2 2 2 

Survey of Music Literature 43, 44, 45 3 3 3 

Orchestra 21 1 , 21 2 , 21» 1 1 1 

English 25, 26, 27, 28 . 3 3 3 

Sophomore Year 

Violin (or other String Instrument) 61b, 62b, 63b 111 

Piano 55b, 56b, 57b (one lesson a week) 111 

Theory 64, 65, 66 (Including Keyboard Harmony) 3 3 3 

Sight Singing 67a, 68a, 69a 111 

Ear Training 67b, 68b, 69b 111 

Music Education 70, 71, 72 (School Music) 2 2 2 

History of Music 73, 74, 75 3 3 3 

Orchestra 51 1 , 51 2 , 51 3 111 

English 75, 76 4 4 

Psychology 65 4 

Junior Year 

Violin (or other String Instrument) 111b, 112b, 113b 111 

Woodwind Instrument (one lesson a week) 111 

Theory 114, 115, 116 (Harmonic and Form Analysis) 2 2 2 

Theory 117, 118, 119 (Counterpoint) 2 2 2 

Music Education 120, 121b, 122b (School Music) 2 2 2 

Conducting 126, 127, 128 2 2 2 

Orchestra 101 1 , 101 2 , 1013 111 

Health 79 4 

Social Studies „. 4 4 

103 



Fine Arts 



Senior Year 

Violin (or other String Instrument) 161b, 162b, 163b 111 

Brass Instrument (one lesson a week) 111 

Theory 167, 168, 169 (Orchestration) 2 2 2 

String Instrument Class Methods 191 2 

Woodwind Instruments and Percussion Class Methods 192 2 

Brass Instruments and Percussion Class Methods 193 2 

Advanced Instrumental Conducting and Study of Band and 

Orchestral Materials 194, 195, 196 2 2 2 

Orchestra 1511, 1512, 1513 111 

Psychology 119 - 4 

Education 113 4 

Education 169 _1 4 

Education 186 ...... 5 

Education 185 5 

Science 23 4 

INSTRUMENTAL SUPERVISOR'S CURRICULUM 

(Minor in a Brass or Woodwind Instrument) 

(Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Music Education) 

Freshman Year 

Major Instrument (one lesson a week) 111 

Piano 25c, 26c, 27c (two lessons a week) 2 2 2 

Theory 34, 35, 36 (Including Keyboard Harmony) 3 3 3 

Sight Singing 37a, 38a, 39a 111 

Ear Training 37b, 38b, 39b 2 2 2 

Survey of Music Literature 43, 44, 45 3 3 3 

Band 22i, 222, 2 23 111 

English 25, 26, 27, 28 * 1 3 3 3 

Sophomore Year 

Major Instrument (one lesson a week) 111 

Piano 55b, 56b, 57b (one lesson a week) 111 

Theory 64, 65, 66 (Including Keyboard Harmony) 3 3 3 

Sight Singing 67a, 68a, 69a 111 

Ear Training 67b, 68b 69b 111 

Music Education 70, 71, 72 (School Music) 2 2 2 

History of Music 73, 74, 75 3 3 3 

Band 521, 522, 523 111 

English 75, 76 4 4 

Psychology 65 4 

Junior Year 

Major Instrument (one lesson a week) 111 

String Instrument (one lesson a week) 111 

Theory 114, 115, 116 (Harmonic and Form Analysis) 2 2 2 

Theory 117, 118, 119 (Counterpoint) 2 2 2 

Music Education 120 121b, 122b (School Music) 2 2 2 

Conducting 126, 127, 128 2 2 2 

Band 102*, 1022, iQ23 111 

Health 79 4 

Social Studies 4 4 

104 



Fine Arts 



Senior Year 

Major Instrument (one lesson a week) 111 

Woodwind or Brass Instrument (one lesson a week) 111 

Theory 167, 168, 169 (Orchestration) 2 2 2 

String Instruments Class Methods 191 2 

Woodwind Instruments and Percussion Class Methods 192— _ 2 

Brass Instruments and Percussion Class Methods 193 2 

Advanced Instrumental Conducting and Study of Band and 

Orchestral Materials 194, 195, 196 2 2 2 

Band 1521, 1522, i 52 3 111 

Psychology 119 4 

Education 113 4 

E ducation 169 '. '. 4 

Education 186 5 

Education 185 . 5 

Science 23 4 

CHURCH MUSIC AND ORGAN MAJOR 

(Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music) 

Freshman Year 

Organ 46c, 47c, 48c 2 2 2 

Piano 25c, 26c, 27c . 2 2 2 

Theory 34, 35, 36 (Including Keyboard Harmony) 3 3 3 

Sight Singing 37a, 38a, 39a 111 

Ear Training 37b, 38b, 39b 2 2 2 

Survey of Music Literature 43, 44, 45 3 3 3 

Music 20 1 , 20 2 , 20 3 111 

English 25, 26, 27, 28 3 3 3 

Sophomore Year 

Organ 76c, 77c, 78c 2 2 2 

Piano 55c, 56c, 57c 2 2 2 

Theory 64, 65, 66 (Including Keyboard Harmony) 3 3 3 

Sight Singing 67a, 68a, 69a 111 

Ear Training 67b, 68b, 69b 111 

History of Music 73, 74, 75 3 3 3 

Music 50i, 5Q2, 5 3 111 

English 75, 76 4 4 

Psychology 65 4 

Junior Year 

Organ 136c, 137c, 138c 2 2 2 

Voice 28c, 29c, 30c 2 2 2 

Theory 114, 115, 116 (Harmonic and Form Analysis) 2 2 2 

Theory 117, 118, 119 (Counterpoint) 2 2 2 

Conducting 126, 127, 128 2 2 2 

Music 1001, 1002, loos 111 

Academic Elective 4 4 4 

Senior Year 

Organ 186c, 187c, 188c 2 2 2 

Voice 58c, 59c, 60c 2 2 2 

Advanced Choral Conducting and Literature 209, 210, 211 _ 2 2 2 

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Fine Arts 



History of Church Music 212, 213, 214 2 2 2 

Administration of Church Music 215,216,217 2 2 2 

Liturgies 218, 219, 220 2 2 2 

Music 150 1 , 1502, 15Q3 111 

Academic Elective 4 4 4 

Note: The Academic Electives must be taken in the fields of 
History, Language and Religion. 

HARP MAJOR 

(Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music) 

Freshman Year 

Harp 49c, 50c, 51c (two lessons a week) 2 2 2 

Piano 25b, 26b, 27b 111 

Theory 34, 35, 36 (Including Keyboard Harmony) 3 3 3 

Sight Singing 37a, 38a, 39a 111 

Ear Training 37b, 38b, 39b 2 2 2 

Survey of Music Literature 43, 44, 45 3 3 3 

Orchestra 211, 2 12, 23^ 111 

English 25, 26, 27, 28 3 3 3 

Sophomore Year 

Harp 79c, 80c, 81c (two lessons a week) 2 2 2 

Piano 55b, 56b, 57b 111 

Theory 64, 65, 66 (Including Keyboard Harmony) 3 3 3 

Sight Singing 67a, 68a, 69a 111 

Ear Training 67b, 68b, 69b 111 

History of Music 73, 74, 75 3 3 3 

Orchestra 51*, 512, 513 _ 111 

English 75, 76 4 4 

Psychology 65 4 

Junior Year 

Harp 139a, 140a, 141a 4 4 4 

Theory 114, 115, 116 (Harmonic and Form Analysis) 2 2 2 

Theory 117, 118, 119 (Counterpoint) _I 2 2 2 

Music Elective 2 2 2 

Orchestra 101*, 101 2 , 101 3 111 

Foreign Language (French or German) 4 4 4 

Senior Year 

Harp 189a, 190a, 191 4 4 4 

Theory 164, 165, 166 (Composition 2 2 2 

Theory 167, 168, 169 (Orchestration) „ 2 2 2 

Harp Ensemble . 2 2 2 

Orchestra 1511, 1512, 1513 111 

Psychology 119 . 4 

Education 113 . 4 

Education 169 4 

Practice 

Regular hours of practice are assigned each student by the Chair- 
man of the Division. The number of hours of daily practice depends 
on the classification of student. Mus.B. students are required to prac- 

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tice three hours daily in their freshman and sophomore years and four 
hours daily in their junior and senior years. Of other classifications 
of students, one hour daily practice is required. 

Recitals 

In order that students may become accustomed to appearing in 
public, frequent afternoon recitals are given. Public recitals are given 
by advanced students as often as it is consistent with their regular 
work. 

All applicants for the Mus.B. degree are required to appear on 
afternoon programs, once in the freshman year, twice in the sopho- 
more, and three times in both junior and senior years. 

Opportunities are given students to hear the best music in con- 
certs given by the members of the music faculty and visiting artists. 
Attendance at all recitals is obligatory. 

Special Requirements 

All non-resident students are required to practice in the Music 
Building under supervision. 

All students, regular or special, are required to sing or play in 
any chorus, quartet, orchestra or band, in which their presence may 
be desired. 

No student in the Department of Music may appear as a repre- 
sentative of the College in a public musical performance, except by 
permission of the Chairman of the Division of Fine Arts. 

N.B. — Not over six quarter hours in choral music, orchestra or 
band are allowed in the academic degree curricula. 

APPLIED MUSIC 

25-26-27 (a) (b) (c)— Freshman Piano (1, 2 or 3 hrs. each qr.): 
55-56-57 (a) (b) (c) — Sophomore Piano (1, 2 or 3 hrs. each qr.); 
105-106-107 (a) (b) (c) — Junior Piano (1, 2 or 4 hrs. each qr.) ; 155- 
156-157 (a) (b) (c) — Senior Piano (1, 2 or 4 hrs. each qr.) 

31-32-33 (a) (b) (c)— Freshman Violin (1, 2 or 3 hrs. each qr.); 
61-62-63 (a) (b) (c) — Sophomore Violin ( 1, 2 or 3 hrs. each qr.) ; 
111-112-113 (a) (b) (c)— Junior Violin (1, 2 or 4 hrs. each qr.); 161- 
162-163 (a) (b) (c)— Senior Violin (1, 2 or 4 hrs. each qr.) 

22-23-24 (a) (b) (c) — Freshman Violoncello (1, 2 or 3 hrs. each 
qr.); 52-53-54 (a) (b) (c) — Sophomore Violoncello (, 2 or 3 hrs. each 
qr.); 102-103-104 (a) (b) (c) — Junior Violoncello (1, 2 or 4 hrs. each 
qr.); 152-153-154 (a) (b) (c)— Senior Violoncello (1, 2 or 4 hrs. each 
qr.) 

28-29-30 (a)(b) (c) — Freshman Voice (1 or 2 hrs. each qr.); 58- 
59-60 (a) (b) (c)— Sophomore Voice (1 or 2 hrs. each qr.); 108-109- 
110 (a) (b) (c)— Junior Voice (1, 2 or 4 hrs. each qr.) ; 158-159-160 
(a) (b) (c) — Senior Voice (1, 2 or 4 hrs. each qr.) 

46-47-48 (b) (c) — Freshman Organ (1 or 2 hrs. each qr.); 76-77- 
78 (b) (c)— Sophomore Organ (1 or 2 hrs. each qr.); 136-137-138 (b) 

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(c)— Junior Organ (1 or 2 hrs. each qr.); 186-187-188 (b) (c)— Sen- 
ior Organ (1 or 2 hrs. each qr.) 

49-50-51 (b) (c) — Freshman Harp (1 or 2 hours each qr.); 79- 
80-81 (b) (c) — Sophomore Harp (1 or 2 hours each qr.); 139-140-141 

(a) (b) (c)— Junior Harp (1, 2, or 4 hours each qr.); 189-190-191 (a) 

(b) (c) — Senior Harp (1, 2, or 4 hours each qr.) 

THEORETICAL AND HISTORICAL 

34-35-36 — Harmony. Three hours each quarter. 

Elementary harmony beginning with scales, intervals, triads and 
their inversions; cadences; the dominant seventh chords and their in- 
versions; secondary chords and inversions; dominant ninth and its in- 
versions; modulation, etc. Approximately one-third of the time is 
given to Keyboard harmony. 

64-65-66 — Advanced Harmony. Three hours each quarter. 

Prerequisite: 34-35-36. 

Review of Harmony 34, 35, 36. Secondary seventh chords and their 
inversions; mixed chords and their inversions; altered chords; non- 
harmonic tones, etc. Approximately one-third of the time is given to 
keyboard harmony. 

114-115-116 — Harmonic and Form Analysis. Two hours each 
quarter. 

Prerequisite: 64-65-66. 

Harmonic and formal analysis of the forms of polyphonic and har- 
monic structures and innovations in the works of composers of the 
modern school are also analyzed. 

117-118-119 — Elementary Counterpoint. Two hours each quarter. 

Prerequisite: 64-65-66. 

A study of the fundamentals of melody writing and voice asso- 
ciation at the conclusion of which the student will be able to write a 
two-part invention employing canonic imitation. 

164-165-166 — Composition. Two hours each quarter. 

Prerequisite: 114-115-116. 

Composition in the smaller forms up to and including the sonatina 
form. Students in this course are expected to present at student re- 
citals such of their compositions as the teacher may select. 

167-168-169 — Orchestration. Two hours each quarter. 

Prerequisite: 117-118-119. 

A study of the individual characteristics of the various instruments 
comprising the modern orchestra, and of the orchestra as a whole. The 
arrangement for the orchestra of original and standard compositions. 

197-198-199 — Advanced Counterpoint. Two hours each quarter. 
Prerequisite: 117-118-119. 

Applied counterpoint; imitation; canon; invention; invertible 
counterpoint; Fugue. 

200-201-202 — Advanced Composition. Two hours each quarter. 

Prerequisite, 164-165-166. 

The Sonata- Allegro form; Art songs; part songs and anthems. 

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203-204-205 — Advanced Orchestration. Two hours each quarter. 
Prerequisite, 167-168-169. 

37a-38a-39a — Sight Singing. One hour each quarter. 

37b-38b-39b — Ear Training. Two hours each quarter. 
Drill in scales and intervals. Rythmic problems. Dictation of 
simple melodies and chords. 

67a-68a-69a — Advanced Sight Singing. One hour each quarter. 

67b-68b-69b — Advanced Ear Training. One hour each quarter. 

Prerequisite: Sight Singing 37a, 38a, 39a; Ear Training, 37b, 38b, 
39b. 

Complicated rhythms, chromatic scales, reading in different clefs. 
Dictation of exercises in rhythm and intonation. 

HISTORY OF MUSIC 

43-44-45 — Survey of Music Literature. Three hours each quarter. 

A cultural course in the appreciation of music. The object of the 
course is the attainment of appreciative listening and individual un- 
derstanding of a composer's musical message. 

73-74-75 — History of Music. Three hours each quarter. 

Prerequisite, 43-44-45. 

Music of primitive nations. The musical instruments of the Bible. 
Music of the early Christian Church. Rise and development of liturgy. 
Notation. Music and the Renaissance. The Polyphonic Age. The rise of 
opera and oratorio. The periods of Bach and Handel, Haydn and Mo- 
zart. The advent of Beethoven. The rise of virtuosity and romanticism. 
Wagner and the new operatic tendencies. American musical develop- 
ment. 

206-207-208 — Music in World Civilization. Three hours each 
quarter. 

Prerequisite: Music History 73-74-75. 

A background of cultural history designed for the music student; 
the place of music in the educational, religious, social, and esthetic 
life of all peoples and all ages. 

First quarter. Ancient and medieval civilizations; ancient Egypt 
and Mesopotamia; ancient and medieval China and India; Greece and 
Rome; the Byzantine Empire; the culture of Islam. 

Second quarter. Western civilization; the middle ages and the 
renaissance; 5th through the 17th centuries. 

Third quarter. Modern times; the age of reason; the European- 
ization of the world; contemporary trends. 

ENSEMBLE 

123-124-125 — Ensemble. Two hours each quarter. 

A study of the classics arranged for two, four, six and eight 
hands. Original two piano compositions by Schuman, Grieg, Saint- 
Saens, and Debussy. Transposition and sight playing. 

173-174-175 — Advanced Ensemble. Two hours each quarter. 

Prerequisite: 123-124-125. 

A study of Trios by Schubert, Beethoven, etc., and Sonatas for 
Violin and Piano by Bach, Grieg, Brahms, and Caesar Franck. Accom- 
panying. 

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MUSIC EDUCATION (School Music) 

70 — Elementary Music Methods. Two hours. 

Selection and presentation of rote songs; the child voice in sing- 
ing; treatment of the unmusical child; development of rhythmic and 
melodic expression; introduction of staff notation; directed listening. 

71 — Intermediate Music Methods. Two hours. 

Time, tone, and theory problems of the fourth, fifth and sixth 
grades, with emphasis on methods of presentation of materials. Ob- 
servation of actual classroom procedure. 

72 — Junior High School Music Methods. Two hours. 

Materials and methods appropriate for grades 7, 8, and 9. Testing 
and classification of adolescent voices. Choral teaching. Elective class- 
es and assemblies. 

95 — School Music Fundamentals. Four hours. 

This course requires no prerequisite and is open to students of 
any class. Especially valuable to the grade teacher. It deals with the 
fundamentals of music as major and minor scales, chromatic scales, 
time values, etc. Rote singing and appreciation of music through the 
use of the victrola form an interesting part of this course. 

96 — Advanced School Music Fundamentals. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Music 95. 

This course carries on the fundamentals of music as intervals, etc. 
Part singing is introduced, common use of songs and song presenta- 
tion. 

120 — Senior High School Music Methods. Two hours. 

Materials and methods appropriate for grades 10, 11, 12. Liter- 
ature for choir, glee clubs. Elective classes in music appreciation and 
theory. Special performances. 

121a — The Administration of Music Education. Two hours. 

A critical study of the philosophies and theories of various au- 
thorities in Music Education. A final survey of the field in problems 
and solutions, the general preparation of a successful musician and 
teacher. 

121b — Instrumental Methods and Literature. Two hours. 

This course is taken by those preparing themselves for instru- 
mental teaching. A large amount of literature for bands, orchestras, 
and instrumental classes is critcally examined. Often members of the 
class play through the materials as part of their study. 

122a — Seminar in Music Education. Two hours. 
Evaluation of current methods in music education. Criteria for 
selection of materials and classroom procedure. 

122b — Instrumental Organization and Administration. Two hours. 

The purpose of this course is to treat in detail the numerous prob- 
lems which confront every band and orchestra director. Rehearsal 
technique, drilling, tuning, teaching, motivating student practice and 
other problems relating to this subject. Marching band. 

126-127-128 — Conducting. Two hours each quarter. 

The fundamentals of chorus and orchestral conducting are studied, 

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accompanied by much individual practice in conducting material ap- 
propriate for the junior and senior high schools. 

170 — Instrumental Class (Strings). Two hours. 

A class in stringed instruments. Practical instruction in the meth- 
ods of playing the various stringed instruments. Holding the instru- 
ment, the bow, the hand position, etc. For supervisors only. Students 
must play the various instruments. This is not a theoretical course. 

171-172 — Instrumental Class (Winds). Two hours each quarter. 

A class in wind instruments. Practical instruction in the method 
of producing tones on the various wind instruments, methods for be- 
ginning the various scales. For supervisors only. Students must play 
the instruments. This is not a theoretical course. 

176-177-178 — Diction. Two hours each quarter. 
Prerequisite: Junior Voice. 

The correct use and pronunciation of English, Italian, French and 
German as applied to the vocal art, with special stress on Italian. 

179-180-181 — Vocal Pedagogy. Two hours each quarter. 
Vocal characteristics of various types of voices. Treatment which 
should be applied to each. Appropriate exercises for correcting various 
vocal defects. Teaching material suitable for various types of voices. 
Discussions of musical literature of different periods including opera, 
oratorio and lieder. Exercises for physical development. 

182-183-184 — Piano Pedagogy. Two hours each quarter. 

Modern methods of teaching children are studied. The work in- 
cludes lectures, observations of private and class lessons, and practice 
teaching under supervision. The problem involved in the teaching of 
piano to adults is considered. Through lectures, discussion, prescribed 
reading and actual teaching experience the student is given a back- 
ground for future work. Practice teaching is done throughout the sen- 
ior year under supervision. 

185-186-187 — Violin Pedagogy. Two hours each quarter. 

This course is intended for students who expect to teach. In addi- 
tion to the study of different methods of presenting basic technical 
problems, and the review of various etudes, concertos, and other com- 
positions, the student has the advantage of observing and participat- 
ing in both individual and class teaching. 

• 188-189-190 — Lyric Action (Acting in Opera). Two hours each 
quarter. 

Gesture, individual and ensemble, pantomine, operatic roles, stage 
business, technique, and costumes. 

191 — String Instruments Class Methods. Two hours. 

A class in the playing of violin, viola, 'cello and bass as an intro- 
duction to the teaching of these instruments and as demonstration of 
class teaching. 

192 — Woodwind Instruments and Percussion Class Methods. Two 

hours. 

A class in woodwind instruments is conducted as an introduction 
to the teaching of woodwind instruments and as demonstration of 
class teaching of these instruments. The instruments taught include 
clarinet, oboe, flute and bassoon. 

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193 — Brass Instruments and Percussion Class Methods. Two 

hours. 

A class in brass instruments is conducted as an introduction to 
the teaching of brass instruments and as demonstration of class teach- 
ing of these instruments. The instruments taught include trumpet, 
melophone, French horn, trombone, baritone and tuba. 

194-195-196 — Advanced Instrumental Conducting and Study of 
Band and Orchestral Materials. Two hours each quarter. 

Score reading and conducting. Orchestral and band technique, in- 
terpretation, repertoire, rehearsal and performance. Building and 
training the student orchestra and band. 

209-210-211 — Advanced Choral Conducting and Materials. Two 

hours each quarter. 

Prerequisite: 126-127-128 and two years of voice. 

Conducting and interpretation of representative works of the 
great choral schools and composers since the sixteenth century. Study 
of the style of each period and opportunities for the formation of 
judgement in the field of choral music through the examination of a 
cross section of the literature, the use of recordings and the perform- 
ance of many works in class, the fall quarter is devoted to church 
chorus and sacred music. 

CHURCH MUSIC 

212-213-214 — History of Church Music. Two hours each quarter. 
The music of the church as it developed through centuries, based 
on the hymnody of the church. Research in hymnology. 

215-216-217 — Administration of Church Music. Two hours each 
quarter. 

Modern trends and procedure in organizing and developing the 
musical program of the church. Special problems and repertory. 

218-219-220: — Liturgies. Two hours each quarter. 

Fall quarter: The music of the non-liturgical service, its develop- 
ment and modern trend. 

Winter quarter: The music and liturgy of the Lutheran Church, 
the chorale, its development and influence. 

Spring quarter: The music of the Episcopal Church, Anglican 
and plainsing chanting, the Canticles, the Communion Service. 

PRACTICAL MUSIC 

20 1 -20 2 -20 3 — Choral Music. One hour each quarter. 
No credit will be given unless student is a member of the chorus 
three consecutive quarters. 

50 1 -50 2 -50 3 — Choral Music. One hour each quarter. 
Prerequisite: 20 1 -20 2 -20 3 . 

lOOi-lOOMOO 3 — Choral Music. One hour each quarter. 
Prerequisite: SO^O^O 3 . 

150 1 -150 2 -150 3 — Choral Music. One hour each quarter. 
Prerequisite: lOOi-lOO^lOO 3 . 

21 1 -21 2 -21 3 — Orchestral Music. One hour each quarter. 
No credit will be given unless a student is a member of the or- 
chestra three consecutive quarters. 

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51 1 -51 2 -51 3 — Orchestral Music. One hour each quarter. 
Prerequisite: 21 1 -21 2 -21 3 . 

lOlMOlS-lOl 3 — Orchestral Music. One hour each quarter 
Prerequisite: 51 1 -51 2 -5 3 1. 

151 1 -151 2 -151 3 — Orchestral Music. One hour each quarter. 
Prerequisite: lOli-lOlMOl 3 . 

22 1 -22 2 -22 3 — Band Music. One hour each quarter. 
No credit will be given unless a student is a member of the band 
three consecutive quarters. 

52 x -52 2 -52 3 — Band Music. One hour each quarter. 

Prerequisite: 22!-22 2 -22 3 . 

102 1 -102 2 -102 3 — Band Music. One hour each quarter. 

Prerequisite: 52!-52 2 -52 3 . 

152 1 -152 2 -152 3 — Band Music. One hour each quarter. 

Prerequisite: 102i-102 2 -102 3 . 

GRADUATE COURSES 

APPLIED MUSIC 

505-506-507 — Piano. Four hours each quarter. 

508-509-510 — Voice. Four hours each quarter. 

517-518-519 — Organ. Four hours each quarter. 

THEORETICAL AND HISTORICAL 

521-522-523 — Analytical Technic. Two hours each quarter. 
A Graduate Course in the technic of Harmonic and Contrapuntal 
Analysis. 

524-525-526 — Pedagogy of Theory. Two hours each quarter. 
A course in the teaching of theory for the graduate student. 

527-528-529 — Music Literature. Four hours each quarter. 

Advanced work in various fields of Musical Literature with 
special emphasis on the style-analysis and the performance of music 
of all periods by members of the class. 

536-537-538 — Advanced History of Music. Three hours each 
quarter. 

Prerequisite: 73-74-75. 

A graduate seminar course. The various fields of music are 
covered in detail by means of individual reports and papers from 
members of the class. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

530-531-532— Psychology of Music. Two hours each quarter. 

This course is designed particularly for teachers and prospective 
teachers of music. Its aim is to present material from the Science of 
Psychology which leads to an understanding of individual differences 
in musical capacities and concomitant application in teaching. As a 
basic course it deals with the fundamentals which are essential to an 
understanding of current psychological Tests and Measurements in 
Music. 

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533-534-535 — Seminar in Music Education. Two hours each 
quarter. 

The major for those registered for the Master's Degree in Music 
Education. It is also open by permission to other graduate students 
who are interested in the teaching of music in th University, College, 
Conservatory or Public School. 

This course reviews the current philosophy of education in this 
country, with special reference to the place of music in the curricu- 
lum. It also includes a review and criticism of Music Curricula, and 
an evaluation of the material and methods of the various types of 
music schools mentioned above. 

ART 

Mr. Lok Miss D'Olive 

Art students make direct visits to local exhibits which are spon- 
sored by the Hattiesburg Art Association. 

Exhibitions in the campus gallery are conducted by a committee 
of art majors. 

The Department reserves the right to retain student work for ex- 
hibition purposes. 

21 — Beginning Drawing. Three hours. 

Drawing in various black and white media beginning with pencil 
and charcoal with further experiments in ink, wash, and mixed 
techniques. Studies in linear perspective and light and shade. 

23 — Beginning Design. Three hours. 

Study of the terms of visual design, simple problems in balance 
and counter balance, line, texture, and a number of more extensive 
problems involving all the design elements and bridging the gap be- 
tween abstract and natural symbols. Some simple lettering. 

25 — Introductory Art. Four hours. 

Fundamentals of lettering; perspective; light and shade; figure 
and animal drawing; color theory; still life; landscape; design. 
For students in the teaching program. 

26 — Elementary School Art. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Fine Arts 25. 

Problems in this course follow work suggested by the Mississippi 
Course of Study in Art for Elementary Schools. 

28 — Intermediate Drawing. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 21 or equivalent. 

More complex still life drawings in black and white, some figure 
and landscape study. An introduction to the more fluid media, tem- 
pera, watercolor and mixed techniques in color. 

32 — Intermediate Design. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Art 23 or equivalent. 

A systematic study of the theory of color. Some problems in 
two-dimensional design involving various kinds of color harmony. 

34 — Figure Drawing. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Art 21, 23, 28, and 32 or equivalent. 
Study of the construction and the use of the human figure in de- 
sign. Drawing from the model in various media. 

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36 — Clay Modeling. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Art 21, 23, 28, and 32 or equivalent. 
A study of three-dimensional design as applied to ceramic mate- 
rials. Problems in small sculpture and simple vessel forms. 

110 — Allied Arts of Design and A Basis for Criticism. Three 
hours. 

A series of illustrated lectures on the "minor arts:" ceramics, 
stained glass, fabric, wood, and metal work with a systematic basis 
for criticism using function, form, materials, and design. Open to all 
students. 

112 — History of Art I. Three hours. 

Pre-renaissance and renaissance art. A course in appreciation. 
Open to all students. 

113— History of Art II. Three hours. 

Post-renaissance and modern art. A course in appreciation. Open 
to all students. 

118 — Water Color Painting I. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Art 21, 23, 28, and 32 or equivalent. 
Studies in still life, figure, and some landscape in transparent 
and opaque watercolor. 

120 — Pictorial Composition. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Art 21, 23, 28, and 32 or equivalent. 
Study of the elements of picture building with exemplary prob- 
lems in various media. 

121— Oil Painting I. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Art 21, 23, 28, and 32 or equivalent. 
Studies in the technique of oil painting. Some problems in still 
life and landscape. 

122 — Rendering. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 21, 23, 28, and 32 or equivalent. 

The rendering of objects and materials for commercial presen- 
tation. Recommended for those interested in any form of commercial 
art. 

123 — Lettering and Layout. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Art 21, 23, 28, and 32 or equivalent. 
Hand and precision lettering and advertising and show card lay- 
out. 

124 — Surface Decoration. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 21, 23, 28, and 32 or equivalent. 

Wallpaper and textile design, making use of stencil, block print- 
ing and slik screen process. A study of production methods in this 
field. 

125 — Teaching of Art. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Fine Arts 25, 26. 

Aims and activities of art education in the elementary grades. 
Materials, equipment, sources of supply, etc. 

128 — Jewelry Design I. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Art 21, 23, 28, and 32 or equivalent. 
The design of modern costume jewelry, a study of techniques and 
production of simple pieces. 

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Fine Arts 



131 — Ceramics. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Art 36. 

Study of forming techniques (throwing on the wheel, etc.), glaz- 
ing and other ceramic processes beyond the scope of Art 36. 

132 — Special Projects for Elementary Teachers I. Two hours. 
Some projects in art and methods of presentation to children in 
the grades. 

133 — Special Projects for Elementary Teachers II. Two hours. 
Additional projects as in Art 132. (Need not necessarily follow 
Art 132.) 

134 — Advertising Design. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Art 122 and 123. 

Practical problems in layout of page, section, and design of labels 
and packages. 

150 — Water Color Painting II. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Art 118. 

More complex problems in watercolor involving selection of ma- 
terial fcr compositions in landscape, figure, and still life. 

152— Oil Painting II. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Art 21. 

Further study of composition in oil with emphasis on color har- 
mony. Some problems involving selection of subject matter. 

154 — Illustration. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 34, 120. 

Practical problems in the illustration of poems and short stories. 
Black and white and color studies involving the relation of medium 
and technique to subject. 

156 — Mural. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 34, 120. 

The design of several large-scale mural projects culminating in 
the execution of one in a choice of medium. Special study of the re- 
lation of wall decoration to the surrounding architecture. 

158 — Advertising Project. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 134. 

Fall quarter series or unit project in advertising design and pre- 
sentation involving considerable research. Seminar. 

160 — Jewelry Design II. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Art 128. 

Further study of processes. The setting of gen stones and other 
problems of the craft. 

162 — Advanced Ceramics. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Art 131. 

Special problems in ceramic decoration; experiments in glaze 
making, firing technique, and clay bodies. 



116 



Health and Physical Education 



DIVISION OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

R. G. Lowrey, Chairman 
Health Service: Dr. McLeod, Miss Beedie E. Smith 

Instruction: Dr Lowrey Dr. Robbins, Mr. Frazier, Miss 
Watkins, Miss Hill, Mr. Switzer, Mr. Milam 

Varsity Coaching: Mr. Green, Mr. Vann, Mr. Stonestreet 
Intramurals: Mr. Vann, Miss Watkins 

The health and physical education program is operated for the 
following purposes: (1) to promote the health and fitness of college 
students; (2) to build a basis in scientific information for good health 
attitudes and habits; (3) to train in habits of exercise, recreation, and 
health protection that will be of value in later years; (4) to offer op- 
portunity for recreation; (5) to prepare teachers, coaches, health edu- 
cators, supervisors, and administrators, and other specialists in the 
fields of school and community health, physical education, and recre- 
ation. 

Veterans receive six hours credit in physical education for their 
military training and are therefore exempt from the six hours basic 
activity core requirement in all curricula. Physical education majors, 
however, are not exempt. They must take the six basic courses or 
satisfy the head of the division that they have the equivalent in 
understanding and skills. 

Candidates for varsity teams may receive credit in appropriate 
activity courses. They register under numbers used for the regular 
activity courses, with the letter "v" added to the appropriate number. 
Varsity candidacy or membership does not exempt physical education 
majors from the proficiency requirement stated in the preceding 
paragraph. 

Health and physical education, majors should satif sy core require- 
ments in science by taking Science 23, 24, 37, and 129, together with 
four hours of mathematics. 

Men are required to have suitable activity uniforms consisting of 
shorts, "T" shirts, and soft soled shoes. Women furnish their own 
gym suits and tennis shoes. Shorts and shirts are recommended. It 
is wise for students to acquire their equipment before entering col- 
lege. 

Course numbers followed by "W" indicate courses open only to 
women. Course numbers followed by "M" indicate courses open only 
to men. Course numbers followed by "M-W" indicate separate sec- 
tions with somewhat different content for men and women. 

Health and physical education majors should satisfy core require- 
ments in science by taking Science 23, 24, 37, and 129, together with 
four hours of mathematics. 

HEALTH 

27 — Community Health. Four hours. 

Community control of environmental health hazards; community 
control of diseases; health agencies. 

117 



Health and Physical Education 



79 — Personal Health. Four hours. 

The human body and its functioning as related to problems of 
health and disease. 

123 — Food Problems as Related to Health. Two hours. 

125— Problems of Child Health. Four hours. 
Personal health of the child, with emphasis on problems of 
growth. 

131 — Sanitation. Four hours. 

Problems of sanitation in the home and school; in food producing 
and handling, water supply, waste and excreta disposal. 

133 — First Aid. Two hours. 

Standard first aid as approved by the American Red Cross. 

134 — Home Nursing. Two hours. 
The care of the sick in the home. 

143 — Advanced First Aid. Two hours. 
Prerequisite: Health 133. 

152 — Physiology of Exercise. Two hours. 

A study of the physiological changes which occur in the body 
during muscular activity. 

154 — Health Education. Four hours. 

Using community resources and community organization. Co- 
ordinating the school program with the community program. Special 
emphasis on materials and techniques for elementary schools. 

155 — Health Education for High School Teachers. Four hours. 
Materials and techniques for high school teachers of health. Con- 
ducting the school health program at the secondary level. 

166 — Anatomy of Muscles, Joints, and Bones. Two hours. 

192— School Health. Four hours. 

Organization and operation of a school health program. 

194 — Tests and Measurements in Health and Physical Education. 

Four hours. 

Tests of health, fitness, strength, skills and abilities. Adminis- 
tration and interpretation. Open to qualified seniors and graduates. 

196 — Marriage and Family Life. Three hours. 
Physical and emotional basis for successful marriage and parent- 
hood. 

198 — Child and Adolescent Dynamics. Three hours. 

Problems growing out of the emotional needs of the developing 
child and the adolescent. The parents' responsibility and the teach- 
ers' responsibility for sex education. 

540 — Problems of Administration in Health, Physical Education, 
and Recreation. Four hours. 

Objectives, selection and care of equipment, school and commun- 
ity organizations, facilities, budget, and finance, educational publicity. 

118 



Health and Physical Education 



542 — Problems of Curriculum in Health and Physical Education. 

Four hours. 

Fundamental bases and principles of curriculum construction, an- 
alysis of activities for teaching purposes, program planning. 

544 — Foundations and Trends in Health and Physical Education. 

Four hours. 

Functions and principles as determined by history, biology, and 
psychology. 

546 — Advanced School Hygiene. Four hours. 

(Prerequisite, adequate background in science.) Objectives, 
health service, plant and equipment, meeting community needs, uti- 
lizing community resources, health instiuction. 

548 — Seminar in Health and Physical Education. Two hours. 
i Discovery and recognition of problems, evaluation of problems 
and procedures, type and techniques of research. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Theory Courses 

56 — History of Physical Education. Two hours. 

70 — Introduction of Physical Education. Four hours. 

lOOm-a-b-c — Coaching of Competitive Sports. Six hours. 

HOw — Techniques of Teaching Major and Minor Sports. Four 
hours. 

118m — Care of Athletic Injuries. Two hours. 

120m-w — Techniques of Teaching Tumbling and Calisthenics. 

Two hours. 

121w-a — Intermediate Modern Dance. One hour. 

Prerequisite: 5w. 

121w-b — Advanced Modern Dance. One hour. 
- Prerequisite: 5w and 121a. 

122w — Techniques of Teaching Rhythmics. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Some knowledge of music. 

133w — Camp Counseling. Two hours. 

140 — Community and Recreational Leadership. Four hours. 

144 (a) m-w — Life Saving and Water Safety. Two hours. 

144 (b) m-w — Watery Safety — Instructors Course. Two hours. 

149 — Physical Education in the Elementary School. Four hours. 

151m-w — Physical Education in the High School. Four hours. 

152 — Physiology of Exercise. Two hours. 

A study of the physiological changes which occur in the body dur- 
ing muscular activity. 

155m-w — Officiating in Major and Minor Sports. Four hours. 

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Health and Physical Education 



160m — Techniques of Athletic Management. Four hours. 

181m-w — Preventive and Corrective Physical Education. Four 
hours. 

182 — Kinesiology. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Health 166. 

187 — Theory of Teaching Swimming and Diving. Two hours. 
Prerequisite: 144a or 144b. 

190 — Organization and Administration of Physical Education. 

Four hours. 

Activity Courses 

1, 2, 3w — Seasonal Sports and Activities for Freshmen. One 

hour. 

Volleyball and Basketball; Folk and Social Dancing; Softball and 
Swimming. 

I, 2, 3m — Seasonal Sports and Activities for Freshman. One 

hour. 

Tumbling; Boxing; Wrestling; Tennis, and Swimming. 

4, 5, 6w — Seasonal Sports and Activities for Sophomores. One 
hour. 

Choice of tennis or golf; modern, dance; modern dance and swim- 
ming. 

4, 5, 6m — Seasonal Sports and Activities for Sophomores. One 

hour. 

Basketball; Volleyball; Golf; Track and Field, and Swimming. 

II, 12, 13w-m — Individual Physical Education for Freshmen. One 

hour each quarter. See description below. 

14, 15, 16w-m — Individual Physical Activities. 

For those who desire to improve their posture or to overcome 
such detriments to health and efficiency as may be favorably influ- 
enced by advice and exercise, e.g., fallen arches, weak and painful 
feet, weak abdominal muscles, indigestion, constipation, overweight, 
underweight, sleeplessness, poor circulation, weak heart; or for those 
who desire to learn exercises to do at home. 

73 — Social Dancing. One hour. 
lOlm-w — Softball. One hour. 
102m— Football. One hour. 
104m-w — Basketball. One hour. 
106m. — Baseball. One hour. 
108m-w. — Badminton. One hour. 
109w — Archery. One hour. 
112m-w— Golf. One hour. 
117 — Folk Dancing. One hour. 
119m-w — Bowling. One hour. 

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Home Economics 



DIVISION OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Bertha Fritzsche, Chairman 

Miss Fritzsche Miss Thompson Miss Campbell Mrs. Newman 
Miss Owings Miss Warren Mrs. McEvilly Mrs. Gill 

Students who are candidates for the B.S. degree with a major 
in Vocational Home Economics should follow the curriculum outlined 
below: 

Freshman 

Hours 

Library Science 29 1 

English Composition and Grammar 10 

Science 25, 28, 27 12 

Social Studies, including History 29 12 

Home Economics 26 or 50 4 

Home Economics 37 4 

Home Economics 22 2 

Physical Education 3 

Total 48 

Sophomore 

Social Science 55 4 

Speech 52 4 

Sociology 63 or 75 4 

Science 37 * 4 

Fine Arts 77 4 

Psychology 65 4 

Science 92 4 

Home Economics 85 4 

English (two Sophomore Courses) 8 

Health 79 4 

Physical Education 3 

Elective 1 

Total 48 

Junior 

Science 136 4 

Psychology 119 4 

Education 162 2 

Education 113 4 

Home Economics 104 4 

Home Economics 105 4 

Home Economics 135 4 

Home Economics 180 4 

Home Economics 115 4 

Home Economics 128 2 

Science 139 f 4 

Elective '- 8 

Total 48 

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Home Economics 



Senior 

Home Economics 125 4 

Home Economics 138 4 

Home Economics 150 4 

Science 145 or Home Economics 200 . 4 or 5 

Education 185, 186 10 

Home Economics 196 4 

Home Economics 197 6 

Health 133, 134 4 

Elective 8 or 9 

Total 48 

Sum Total 192 

Students who are candidates for the A.B. degree with a major in 
Homemaking should follow the curriculum outlined below: 

Freshman 

Hours 

History 29, Miss. History 4 

Library Science 29 1 

English Composition and Grammar 9 or 10 

Home Economics 26 or 50, Clothing 4 

Home Economics 37, Foods 4 

Foreign Language 12 

Science 37 * 4 

Home Economics 22 2 

Physical Education 3 

Total 48 

Sophomore 

Social Science 55, Economics 4 

Social Science 63 or 75, Sociology 4 

Fine Arts 77, Design 4 

Psychology 65, Elementary Psychology 4 

Home Economics 85, Foods 4 

English (two Sophomore Courses) 8 

Health 79, Hygiene 4 

Foreign Language 12 

Physical Education 3 

Elective 1 

Total 48 

Junior 

Fine Arts 140, Art Appreciation 4 

Home Economics 104, Art Related to Home and Dress J __ 4 

Home Economics 105, House Furnishing 4 

Home Economics 135, Nutrition 4 

Home Economics 115, Household Equipment 4 

Home Economics 128, The Family 2 

Science 137, Household Physics 4 

Psychology 116, Child Psychology _•_ 4 

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Home Economics 



Science 139, Bacteriology 4 

Physical Education 3 

Social Science 8 

Speech 4 

Electives 1 

Total 48 

Senior 

Home Economics 125, Advanced Clothing & Consumer Problems.. 4 

Home Economics 138, Child Development 4 

Home Economics 150, Clothing for the Family 4 

Home Economics 196, Household Economics 4 

Home Economics 197, House Residence 6 

Health 133, First Aid, and 134, Home Nursing 4 

Home Economics 220, Child Development 4 

Physical Education 1 

Home Economics 142 4 

Electives 13 

Total 48 

CLOTHING, TEXTILES AND RELATED ART 

26 — Textiles and Clothing. Four hours. 

Two one-hour recitations and two two-hour laboratory periods a 
week. 

The purpose of this course is to enable the student to select in- 
telligently those textiles most commonly used and to enable the stu- 
dent to plan, select, construct, and care for her wardrobe. This in- 
volves a study of (1) garments suited to income, occasion and individ- 
ual (2) planning and making garments of cotton, rayon, or linen, (3) 
care of these garments, (4) the use and care of the sewing equipment, 
(5) the selection and use of commercial patterns, and (6) the proper 
accessories. 

50 — Textiles and Clothing. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: H. E. 26 or its equivalent. 

Two one-hour periods and two two-hour laboratory periods week- 
ly. 

A study of the characteristics, uses, and costs of standard ma- 
terial; simple tests for identifying fibers. Individual problems are 
chosen with emphasis on selection of suitable material; fitting and 
construction problems involved. Tailored garments of wool and wool 
substitutes are given major consideration. Remodeling and mending 
of garments are encouraged. 

104 — Art Related to the Home and Dress. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Fire Arts 23. 

Three one-hour periods and one two-hour period per week. 

The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the 
application of the principles of design in clothing, clothing accessor- 
ies, exterior and interior of houses. Opportunity is furnished for prac- 
tical solutions of personal and home design problems. 

105 — Housing and House Furnishings. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: H. E. 104. 

Three one-hour periods and one two-hour period a week. 

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Home Economics 



The purpose of this course is to study the economic and sociolog- 
ical problems in housing and house furnishings; house plans in rela- 
tion to their influence on family life; trends in heating, plumbing and 
lighting the house; selection and arrangement of house furnishings. 

125 — Advanced Clothing and Consumer Problems. Four hours. 

Two one-hour periods and two two-hour periods per week. 

Prerequisite: H. E. 26 or 50; H. E. 104. 

Selected topics dealing with development in the clothing field; 
problems of the household buyer resulting from the introduction of 
new textile fibers and fabrics; new manufacturing processes and their 
relation to proposed standards of legislation for consumer protection; 
advanced work involving designing, construction, fitting, tailoring, 
and procedures essential to independent work are included. 

150 — Family Clothing and Textiles. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: H. E. 26 or 50; H. E. 104. 

Two one-hour periods and two two-hour periods a week. 

This course deals with planning the wardrobe within different in- 
come levels; renovating, remodeling old garments and construction of 
new garments for all members of the family; the designing and con- 
struction of a child's self-help garment. Special emphasis is placed on 
economic problems with which families are faced in meeting their 
clothing needs. 

FOODS AND NUTRITION 

37 — Food Study. Four hours. 

Two theory and two laboratory periods weekly. 

A short study of the body's need for food and the application of 
this study in the planning, preparation and serving of simple meals in 
family groups. 

85 — Advanced Foods. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: H. E. 37. 

Two theory and two laboratory periods weekly. 

A continuation of Food Study 37 with emphasis on more advanced 
meal planning, preparation and service. Scientific principles of cook- 
ery are emphasized. 

123 — Elementary Course in Nutrition. Two hours. 

This course is planned for students other than home economics 
majors, to instruct them in the nutritional needs of the body and the 
selection of food to meet these needs. Such laboratory work as the in- 
structor deems necessary will be included. 

135 — Nutrition. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: H. E. 85. 

Two theory and two laboratory periods weekly. 

An intensive study of the body's need for food. Includes chem- 
istry of digestion; care of the digestive system; energy, protein, min- 
eral and vitamin requirements of the body during childhood, adoles- 
ence, adult life and old age with the simplest ways of meeting these 
requirements. 

142 — Experimental Foods. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: H. E. 85. 

Two theory periods and two double periods. 

Elementary research to determine factors affecting standard pro- 

124 



Home Economics 



ducts. Experimentation in preparation, ingredients, methods of cook- 
ing, temperature and utensils used. 

144 — The School Lunch. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: H. E. 85. 

One theory period and three double periods weekly. 

Actual experience in menu planning and large quantity food pre- 
paration for a school lunch room; food buying and serving. A study of 
equipment and organization for school lunch rooms. 

176 — Diet in Disease. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Home Economics 135. 

A study of diseases which are influenced by diet and the dietetic 
treatment of these diseases. 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND THE FAMILY 

128— The Family. Two hours. 

A study designed for increasing understanding of personalities in 
relation to life in a family group; insight into the aspects of marriage 
and family relationships; responsibilities of parents of families of to- 
morrow. 

138 — Child Development. Four hours. 

Three one-hour recitations and five hours of observation and par- 
ticipation in the Nursery School weekly. 

This course is designed to create interest in pre-school children 
and to develop an understanding of the developments and behavior 
patterns of pre-school children; problems involved in guiding children 
towards happy, successful adulthood. 

220 — Advanced Child Development. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: H. E. 138. 

Two one-hour recitations weekly plus six hours of participation 
in the Nursery School. 

This course is for students interested in further study of pre- 
school children and in developing techniques and accepting full re- 
sponsibilities in the daily activities of the Nursery School. 

THE HOUSE AND HOME MANAGEMENT 

115 — Household Appliances. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: H. E. 85. 

Two theory and two laboratory periods weekly. 
A study of the selection, operation, care and arrangement of ap- 
pliances in the home. Minor repairs are emphasized. 

196 — Household Economics. Four hours. 

Problems of homemaking relating to the wise use of time, energy, 
money and resources of the home. Consumer problems of the home- 
maker are considered with ways of better meeting these problems. 

197 — Practical Home Management. Six hours. 

Prerequisite: H. E. 135, H. E. 196. 

The aim of this course is to apply the principles of homemaking 
through actual participation in responsibilities and activities of the 
home. Students live in the home management house for one quarter 
and assume the care of the home, meal planning, preparation and 

125 



Home Economics 



serving for a family group, care of a baby, and social responsibilities 
of the home. 

A desired outcome of this group life is that the student may have 
acquired habits of efficient homemaking and ability to maintain 
worthy fanily relationships. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

Home Economics 22 — Introduction to Home Economics. Two 

hours. 

The purpose of this course is to introduce those majoring in Home 
Economics to it as a field of study. It will include some understand- 
ing of the value of Home Economics both as to its contribution to 
personal living and, as to its vocational opportunities. Help will be 
given on some problems related to Home Economics with which the 
College Freshman is encountered. 

146 — Teaching Food and Nutrition in the Elementary Grades. 

Four hours. 

Three one-hour theory and one two-hour laboratory periods. 

This course is planned to give those preparing to teach in the ele- 
mentary grades some understanding of materials and methods for 
teaching nutrition. Help will be given in recognizing evidences of good 
nutrition in children. The use in teaching elementary school children 
of practical problems in food production, establishing desirable habits 
of food preparation and eating will be included. The part the school 
lunch room plays in an educational program will be considered. 

180 — The Teaching of Homemaking. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing in Home Economics. 

A study of the place of homemaking in the whole school program. 
Special emphasis is given to objectives, class and home experiences, 
organization of teaching plans and materials, and evaluation for the 
Junior and senior high school homemaking program. Consideration is 
given to the teacher's part in the school lunch program, F. H. A. 
Club work, and other school or community activities. 

185-186 — Student Teaching and Observation (Participation in 
Homemaking.) Ten hours. 

Prerequisite: H. E. 180. 

Opportunities are provided for observation of homemaking in the 
elementary school program, and in junior and senior high school home- 
making classes. 

Student teaching opportunities are provided in the Demonstration 
School on the campus, and in a few of the other schools in the state 
where there is a strong homemaking- program. For off-campus teach- 
ing, students reside in the community during their six weeks period 
of teaching. Planned participation in the school lunch room program, 
P. T. A. meetings, chapel programs, and other regular school or cur- 
ricular activities are a part of the total student teaching experiences. 

200 — Teaching Homemaking to Adults. Five hours. 
Prerequisite: H. E. 180. 

A study of the adult homemaking program with experiences 
which will help to effectively participate in it. 



126 



Industrial Arts 



DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

Orville Thomas 

20 — Industrial Arts for Elementary Teachers. Four hours. 

A course for teachers of both lower and upper elementary work. 
It is intended as an aid to the teacher in her preparation to guide the 
children in all free activities. Cardboard and wood construction, clay 
modeling, weaving, coping saw work, letter cutting and basketry will 
be included. 

27 — Mechanical Drawing. Two hours. 

Use of drawing instruments, geometric constructions. Conventions 
used in depicting objects for reproduction. Representation in one, two 
and three dimensions. Shades and shadows. Object drawing. Special 
practice in lettering. Orthographic projection, cross-sections, dimen- 
sioning. Four hour class. 

28 — Mechanical Drawing. Two hours. 

Development of surfaces and intersections for sheet metal work. 
Isometic, oblique, and cabinet projection. Drafting room practice. Ad- 
vanced study of working drawings, detail and assembly, sheet lay-out, 
and structures. Four hour class. 

31a — Woodwork. Two hours. 

A course designed to develop skill, knowledge and appreciation in 
the care and use of woodworking tools, materials, processes, and pro- 
ducts. The course will include the following: hand and machine tools, 
tool processes, tool maintenance, wood and lumber, joints, gluing, 
nails and screws, wood turning, carving and inlaying, finishing and 
upholstery. Four hour class. 

31b — Continuation of 31a Woodwork. Two hours. 

41 — General Shop. Four hours. 

This course is a general course in accordance with the modern de- 
velopment of industrial education. Sheet, metal, elementary electricity, 
and house wiring are main topics covered. Eight hour class. 

63 — Advanced Woodwork. Four hours. 

Continuation of Industrial Arts 31 with emphasis on trade prac- 
tices and production work. Window and door frame construction, stair- 
case design, cabinet making, roof framing, and finishes will receive 
special attention. Eight hour class. 

87 — Mechanical Drawing. Two hours. 

Approved drawing room methods and modern standards are stud- 
ied and applied. Neatness, accuracy, and economy of time are stressed. 
Tracing and various methods of reproducing drawings are studied. 
Advanced work in lettering. Four hour class. 

125 — Wood Turning. Four hours. 

Prerequisite industrial Arts 31. 

Elementary to advanced lathe work. Different types of turning 
and scroll work will be offered. Finishing and polishing. Students will 
select individual projects. Eight hour class. 

127 



Language and Literature 



127 — Home Planning and Construction. Four hours. 

A course arranged for students interested in the planning of 
homes. The study of houses of various types will be taken up in de- 
tail. Each member of the class will be required to make a complete 
plan of a modern home, having all conveniences. The students in this 
class will also be taught blueprint reading in order that they might 
understand the meaning of lines, dimensions, and characters pertain- 
ing to plans. Students will have access to mechanical drawing instru- 
ments, so that they may be enabled to draw their plans accurately and 
to scale. Homes in process of construction will be visited by the stu- 
dents of this class. 

DIVISION OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Wilbur W. Stout, Chairman 

Several departments, with a common interest in the communica- 
tion of thought, are grouped together in the Division of Language and 
Literature. In all of these departments the work is largely reading, 
writing, and speaking. 

Combinations of courses can be worked out to satisfy basic re- 
quirements, to provide electives, and to establish major and minor 
fields in literature, speech, newspaper work, librarianship, and the 
translation of foreign languages. 

ENGLISH 

Dr. Stout, Mr. Darby, Mrs. Gough, Mrs. Hawkins, Miss Hickman, 
Mrs. Jenkins, Miss Olsen, Mr. Palmer, Dr. Shands, Miss Thomae, 

Miss Webb. 

25-26-27 — English Composition. Three hours each quarter. 

The purpose of this basic course is to develop in the student an 
ease and fluency in the use of English. Assignments are given to 
counteract an early over-seriousness which is likely to produce a 
heavy style, rigid notions about correctness, and a ponderous platform 
manner. Composition topics are chosen with the widest range of in- 
terest. Surprise topics are used until the student is no longer afraid 
of being taken by surprise. Provocative topics help to eliminate dull- 
ness or perfunctory treatment, and to cultivate animation and sincer- 
ity. Later in the course, when mental and physical stiffness have 
given way to some felicity of expression, more and more care can be 
turned to orderly thinking and the logical presentation of materials. 
Library topics give an introduction to bibliography, documentation, 
and the presentation of research material. 

28— Mechanics of Writing. One hour. 

This is a workbook course in the amenities of Standard English. 
It is required of all freshmen and all transfer students except those 
excused on the basis of a national achievement test. 

62— Business English. Four hours. 

A course for secretaries. (Use of typewriter is a prerequisite). 

75 — Survey of English Literature. Four hours. 

In this reading course for sophomores, no teacher wishes a stu- 
dent to memorize biographical facts, or critical judgments, or the 
dates of poems, plays, and novels. Nor is the healthy interest in 

128 



Language and Literature 



reading allowed to change into loathing under a daily grind of vivi- 
section. Instead a brisk reading pace is set, and the student is en- 
couraged to race through a good story with undiminished zest. The 
reader, not the subject matter, is the chief consideration. Gradually 
the reader will recognize in literary characters and situations his own 
adventuring spirit, immortal in the race, incarnate from generation 
to generation. 

76 — Survey of English Literature. Four hours. 

Continuation of English 75. English 75 is not a prerequisite to 
English 76. 

77 — Recent American Literature. Four hours. 

This course is open to sophomores who have shown an aptitude 
for literature but who do not choose to major in this field. An aver- 
age of B or better on the regular sophomore survey is required for 
admission, and credit is allowed toward a non-professional minor in 
English. This course is a study of the plays of Eugene O'Neill and 
the present-day American stage. 

78 — Recent American Literature. Four hours. 
Continuation of English 77. English 78 is concerned with Ameri- 
can poetry written since the turn of the century. 

80 — Survey of American Literature. Four hours. 
(A student may substitute this course for either quarter of the 
Survey of English Literature by permission of his major professor.) 

110 — Great American Writers. Four hours. 

(This course is occasionally offered on a tutorial basis to stu- 
dents whose average in English 80 was B or better.) 

123 — Shakespearean Comedy. Four hours. 

124 — Shakespearean Tragedy. Four hours. 

126 — Victorian Literature. Four hours, 

131-132-133 — Pre-Renaissance Tutorial. Four hours each quarter. 

The tutorial courses, for which all English majors are expected 
to register as soon as they are able to classify as juniors, provide op- 
portunity for independent reading. The reading may be in many 
fields of thought besides literature provided it throws light on a con- 
cept or theme the student is trying to develop. 

The first quarter is a study of Epic and Romance. Readings in 
Beowulf, the Cid, the Song of Roland, the Nibelungenlied, the Eddas 
and Sagas. Attention to the development of material in Malory, the 
Mabinogion, the High History of the Holy Grail, Parsifal, the Ro- 
mance of the Rose, the beast epic of Reynard the Fox, and the Lays 
of Marie de France. (History 110 should be taken concurrently i? 
possible.) 

The second quarter is an introduction to Medievalism. Studies 
in classical and patristic writing; mysticism and materialism; knowl- 
edge and faith; and especially the clash of church and state from 
which the common man emerges victor. 

The third quarter moves into the early Renaissance and the Prot- 
estant Reformation. (History 176 if not taken previously should be 
taken concurrently.) 

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Language and Literature 



134-135-136 — Post-Renaissance Tutorial. Four hours each quart- 
er. 

The first quarter approaches Puritanism through the writings of 
John Milton and John Bunyan. Readings in the literature of England 
and New England. (History 175 if not taken previously should be 
taken concurrently.) 

The second quarter is a study of neo-classicism. Development 
of the critical spirit, with ideas of taste, polish, good sense, and 
reason. Codes of morality and correctness. Trust in rules and pat- 
terns. Cultivation of urbanity. Relations of England and France in 
the 18th century. 

The third quarter cuts across geographical lines to interpret 
revolutionary naturalism between the emergence of Rousseau (1794) 
and the death of Hegel (1831). Comparative readings in the liter- 
ature of France, England, Germany, and America. 

141 — Teaching of English in Junior and Senior High Schools. 

Four hours. 

146 — Literature of the Bible. Four hours. 

(With the approval of a student's major professor, this course 
offered by the Department of Religious Education may be taken as 
an English elective.) 

560-562-564 — Tutorial in Literary Criticism. Four hours each 
quarter. 

The first quarter undertakes to relate certain masterpieces of 
ancient and neo-classical literature to classical doctrines and prin- 
ciples under which they were written. (Prerequisites English 135 and 
History 175 or the equivalents.) 

The second quarter surveys both medieval and modern romahlis- 
ism in the light of the romantic interpretation of art and life. (Pre- 
requisites English 131 and English 136, and History 110, 174, and 176 
or the equivalents.) 

The third quarter attempts to correlate the literature and philos- 
ophy of realism, naturalism, impressionism, and expressionism. (Pre- 
requisites English 110 and History 177 or the equivalents.) 

580-582-584 — Tutorial in English Philology. Four hours each 
quarter. 

The first quarter is a study of Chaucer to familiarize the student 
with vocabulary and grammar of Middle English. 

The second quarter is a review of historical grammar, with read- 
ings in, the dialects of Middle English. 

The third quarter is a linguistic comparison between British and 
American dialects of Modern. English. 

(Students in this sequence are expected to have a reading knowl- 
edge of both French and German.) 

JOURNALISM 

Miss Cogdell Mr. Darby 

37-a-b-c — Survey of Journalism. Two hours each quarter. 

An introduction to journalism, particularly the field of the mod- 
ern newspaper. The functions of the newspaper and allied fields. 
Opportunities in journalism. Introductory work in news gathering 
and reporting. Students may work on the Student Printz. 

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Language and Literature 



56-a-b-c — News Gathering and News Writing. Four hours each 
quarter. 

Study of techniques of gathering and writing news. Instruction 
and practice in interviewing and writing; discussions of news sources, 
news values and types of news stories. Students gather data and 
write various types of stories. Students must work on the Student 
Printz, and part of the final grade is based upon actual news work 
done. 

57-aJb-c — History of Journalism. Two hours each quarter. 

A survey of the development of journalism, and of the political, 
economic and social forces contributing to that development. A study 
of newspaper traditions and the struggle for freedom of the press. 
A review of the lives of eminent American journalists and the history 
of America's great newspapers. 

137-a-b-c — News Editing. Two hours each quarter. 

Instruction in copyreading, headline writing and newspaper make- 



up. 



138 — Writing Brief Fiction. Four hours. 



This is a course in creative writing for advanced students with 
emphasis on the technique of the short story. The student will pre- 
pare an initial list of a hundred items from his observation on (1) 
distinctive characters (2) unique trains of circumstances (3) themes 
which become an obsesion, and (4) places that are dominated by a 
certain feeling, mood or atmosphere. The instructor will check the 
list and call for notes on all items which look promising and slanting 
toward definite markets will begin. Preference will be given to topics 
that show adequate resources of sincerity, information, insight, and 
timeliness. Two or three stories will be carried through from start 
to finish. 

Prerequisite: A grade of B or better on elementary composition. 

148 — Writing Magazine Articles. Four hours. 

This is a course for advanced writers who wish critical guidance 
in preparing articles for publication. Early in the course the student 
furnishes an extensive list of topics which seem to merit development 
into magazine articles. The topics which appear to have market value 
will be checked, and the student will be invited to show the richness 
of his information. On the basis of notes submitted, the instructor 
will help to slant material toward the needs of definite publications. 
Out of a dozen better-than-average possibilities, two or three articles 
should be worth finishing. Since topics may grow stale quickly or 
may be exploited by other writers, some promptness is desired in 
carrying chosen ideas through from start to finish. 

Prerequisite: A grade of B or better on elementary composition. 

178-a-b-c — Feature Writing. Two hours each quarter. 

Procedure in gathering material for feature stories, especially 
newspaper articles; analysis of reader appeal; study of structure of 
the feature story; development of feature style by practice in writing 
features; study of selling procedure. 

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Language and Literature 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Miss Anna Roberts Mrs. Mary Jo Magee 

29 — How To Use The Library. One hour. 

This course is planned to give the student a working knowledge 
of some of the resources of the library through problems involving the 
use of the most important reference tools. 

Required of all students entering in their freshman year. 

101 — Books and Related Material. Four hours. 

A study of library materials as to principles and methods of se- 
lection and evaluation with emphasis on the reading of many books 
and the examination of all types of printed and audio-visual mater- 
ials; the use of standard selection aids; building and maintaining the 
library collection. 

Required on all library programs. 

103 — Adolescent Literature. Four hours. (Formerly 125). 

Study of the reading interests of the adolescent with criteria for 
selecting books for the high school age. Library Science 101 a pre- 
requisite or may be taken concurrently. 

Ill — Library Service. Two hours. 

Designed for librarians in training to develop the understandings, 
attitudes and information necessary for leadership in a program of 
library service that will contribute to the realization of educational 
objectives, with emphasis on activities, duties, responsibilities and op- 
portunities of work. 

115-116 — Administration and Organization of Materials. Four 
hours each course. 

Methods of organization and administration of the school library; 
planning and equipping; budgets and appropriation; purchase of books 
and other materials; loan systems; mechanical preparation of books. 

Library Science 111 a prerequiscite or may be taken concurrently. 

117 — Children's Literature. Four hours. 
See Department of Education. 

118 — Practice work. Four hours. 

Experience in various phases of library work. Laboratory work 
in the high school especially. Required for the basic library program. 

127 — School Library Reference Materials. Four hours. 

The evaluation of reference materials, general tools, materials in 
subject fields, and the use of the general collection for reference. At- 
tention is given also to methods of teaching the use of these materials 
to pupils. 

Required for the 27 hour program and above. 

132-135 — Classification and Cataloging. Four hours each course. 

Study of the Dewey Decimal classification and the principles of 
cataloging. Practice in classifying and cataloging books and other 
library materials. 

Registration limited to students taking the 36 hour program. 

132 



Language and Literature 



SPEECH 

Dr. Stout Dr. Shands Miss Schleifer 

52 — Fundamentals of Speech. Four hours. 

A course designed to develop an understanding of the basic prin- 
ciples of speech and proficiency in their use. The aim is to lay a 
foundation in the fundamental speech skills: the proper use of the 
voice, bodily action, the selection and organization of materials, and 
speaker-listener relationships. 

(Prerequisite for advanced speech courses.) 

53 — Oral Interpretation. Four hours. 

Development of adequate mental and emotional responses to the 
meaning of literature, and of the power to read orally so as to com- 
municate this appreciation to others. 

54-a-b-c — Logic of Persuasion. Two hours each quarter. 

A course for debaters. Admission of fact as evidence, use of au- 
thority, scope of jurisdiction, and the chain of reasoning that leads to 
a tenable decision. 

55 — Story Telling. Four hours. 

A study of types of children's literature and children's story in- 
terests at each age level. The course provides experience in story 
telling and in the oral interpretation of literature for children. 

101-102-103 — Radio Production. Four hours each quarter. 

A lecture-laboratory course in the production of radio program 
types, with student participation in the broadcast of Radio Workshop 
programs. In three parts: 

101 — Background material and simple program types. 

102 — A study of dramatic program types, with emphasis on pro- 
duction problems, techniques, and procedure. 

103 — A study of variety program types with emphasis on pro- 
duction problems, techniques and procedures. Also a survey of pro- 
gram planning methods in commercial and public service radio shows. 

107 — Children's Theatre. Four hours. 

A study of drama for children. Particular attention will be given 
to the selection, direction and production of plays for children. A 
survey will be made of current children's theatre movements. 

120-a-b-c — Stage Scenery for Amateurs. Two hours each 
quarter. 

An elementary course in scenic design for directors in the school 
theatre. Drafting simple plans for the stage picture. Construction 
of cardboard sets for the stage model. 

(Fee for supplies and materials, $1.00 per quarter.) 

GERMAN 

Dr. Shands Miss Thomae 

35-36-37 — First Year German. Four hours each quarter. 

The aim of this course is to acquaint the students with the rudi- 
ments of the German language, with the emphasis primarily on fit- 
ting them to read it understandingly. 

85-86-87 — Second-Year German. Four hours each quarter. 

The aim of this course is to continue the work of the first year, 
with a gradually increasing emphasis on the active phases of conver- 
sation and composition. About five hundred pages of nineteenth cen- 
tury prose will be read. 

133 



Language and Literature 



FRENCH 

Miss H. Jackson Mr. Nydegger 

25-26-27 — First Year French. Four hours each quarter. 

The aim of this course is to give the student a reading knowledge 
of French of moderate difficulty, an intelligible pronunciation, and an 
understanding of spoken French within the vocabulary range of the 
class. The emphasis of the course is on the essentials of French gram- 
mar, vocabulary, and pronunciation, and the subject matter Of the 
reading material selected will give the student information concerning 
French life, culture, and civilization. 

75-76-77 — Second Year French. Four hours each quarter. 

The aim of this course is to continue the work of the first year 
with an increasing emphasis on conversation, composition, and trans- 
lation. The course will consist of a grammar review with a special 
study of idioms and verbs, class conversation and the reading of selec- 
tions from classic and modern French writers and from current 
French periodicals. 

145-146-147 — Third Year French. Four hours each quarter. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with some 
of the outstanding contributions of France to world culture and civili- 
zation. A survey of French civilization, past and present, as revealed 
by a study of French history, art and literature, is followed by the 
reading of representative masterpieces from several periods of French 
literature. In addition to selections studied in class, written reports 
on collateral readings are required. 

151-152-153 — French Literature Tutorial. Four hours each 
quarter. 

This course is a. study of French life and thought as they are pre- 
sented in French drama from 1827 up to the present date. The out- 
line of the course follows the conventional classification of literary 
style and trends, but the primary emphasis is on the social back- 
ground which caused the literary trend and on the social significance 
of the dramas, class discussions and written reports on specific and 
general topics will be required. 

151 — Romanticism and Realism in Nineteenth Century French 
Drama. 

152 — Naturalism and Symbolism in French Drama. 

153 — Pre-War and Post-War Drama in France. 

Prerequisite: Three years of college French or its equivalent. 

121 — The Teaching of Modern Languages in the High School. 
Four hours. 

By means of lectures, reports and discussions of concrete ques- 
tions and problems confronting the teacher in classroom work, an 
appraisal is made of the objectives, contents and organization of 
courses. The various theories of methods of teaching are studied. 
Present trends in text-books and materials, uses of audio-visual aids 
and devices, sources and value of realia and outside reading, language 
club activities and other points will also be treated. 

Prerequisite: At least two years of the language to be taught 
and preferably three years. 

134 



Language and Literature 



GREEK 

Dr. Vinnedge 

41-42-43 — First Year Greek. Four hours each quarter. 

The aim of this course is to give the student an understanding of 
the basic grammar and vocabulary of Hellenistic Greek and to enable 
him to read simple texts. 

(It should be noted that twelve hours of credit toward a minor in 
Religious Education may be earned by passing this course,) 

SPANISH 

Miss H. Jackson Mr. Nydegger 

31-32-33 — First Year Spanish. Four hours each quarter. 

The aim of this course is to give the student a reading knowledge 
of Spanish of moderate difficulty, an intelligible pronunciation, and an 
understanding of spoken Spanish within the vocabulary range of the 
class. The emphasis of the course is on the essentials of Spanish 
grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation; and the subject matter of 
the reading material selected will give the student information con- 
cerning the life, culture, and civilization of Spain and other Spanish 
speaking countries. 

81-82-83 — Second Year Spanish. Four hours each quarter. 

The aim of this course is to continue the work of the first year 
with an increasing emphasis on conversation, composition, and trans- 
lation. The course will consist of a grammar review with a special 
study of idioms and verbs, class conversation, and the reading of selec- 
tions from classic and modern Spanish writers and from current Span- 
ish periodicals. 

148-149-150 — Third Year Spanish. Four hours each quarter. 

The work of this course will be divided into three parts: (a) re- 
view of grammar and composition; (b) survey of the field of Span- 
ish literature; (c) reading of the most outstanding masterpieces of the 
fit students who have taken the first and second years of Spanish to 
teach in the high schools of the state. 

160-161-162 — Tutorial in Spanish Literature. Four hours each 
quarter. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 148-150 or equivalent. 

Intended for Spanish Majors and those interested in the literature 
of Spain and Spanish America. Individual effort is stressed with 
each student required to read and report upon various authors. 

160 — Tutorial in Golden Age of Spanish Literature. The works 
of Cervantes, Lope de Vega and others of the Golden Age are read 
and discussed. 

161 — Tutorial in Modern Spanish (Novel, Drama and Short 
Story). The works of the more recent Spanish authors and critics 
are studied and the style of the various writers discussed. 

162 — Tutorial in Latin American Literature. The writing of the 
more famous and better known Latin American authors are read and 
compared. The trend and tendencies of Spanish American Literature 
is brought out through medium of conferences and papers. 

135 



Physical Sciences and Mathematics 



DIVISION OF PHYSICAL SCIENCES AND 
MATHEMATICS 

0. V. Austin, Chairman 

CHEMISTRY 

Mr. Austin Mr. Benham Mr. Hurst 

24 — Survey of Chemistry. Four hours. 
Four theory periods per week. 

A brief survey of the fundamental principles and processes of 
chemistry. 

25 — Inorganic Chemistry. Four hours. 

Three theory and one double period per week. 

A course in general inorganic chemistry. A study of the funda- 
mental principles. A comparative study of the more common chemical 
elements and compounds together with the fundamental laws and 
theories concerning their combinations. 

26 — Inorganic Chemistry. Four hours. 
Three theory and one double period per week. 
A continuation of Course 25. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 25. 

27 — Inorganic Chemistry. Four hours. 
Three theory and one double period per week. 
A continuation of Course 26. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 26. 

75 — Analytical Chemistry — Inorganic Qualitative Analysis. Four 
hours. 

One theory and three double periods per week. 

A course intending to give the student a knowledge of the meth- 
ods used in qualitative analysis. A study of the reactions, methods of 
separation and identification of the common metals and acids. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 27. 

76 — Analytical Chemistry — Qualitative Analysis and Quantitative 
Analysis. Four hours. 

One theory and three double periods per week. 

Qualitative Analysis completed and Quantitative Analysis be- 
gun. The quantitative work is designed to give an understanding of 
the techniques necessary in making quantity determinations. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 75. 

77 — Analytical Chemistry — Quantitative Analysis. Four hours. 

One theory and three double periods per week. 

The quantitative work is completed. Typical gravimetric and 
volumetric determinations are studied with an introduction to instru- 
mental analysis. 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 76. 

92 — Organic Chemistry. Four hours. 
Two theory and two double periods per week. 

This is a short course in organic chemistry designed for students 
majoring in home economics. Both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocar- 

136 



Physical Sciences and Mathematics 



bons are studied, and the application of organic chemistry to the 
home is emphasized. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 27. 

130 — Organic Chemistry. Four hours. 

Two theory and two double periods per week. 

This course intends to give the student a knowledge of the funda- 
mental principles of the compounds of carbon. Reactions of the ali- 
phatic hydrocarbons, with their derivatives, their nomenclature, class- 
ification, reactions, relationships and general applications, are studied. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 27. 

Two theory and two double periods per week. 

131 — Organic Chemistry. Four hours. 

A continuation of Course 130 finishing the study of the aliphatic 
hydrocarbons and taking up the study of the aromatic hydrocarbons. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 130. 

132 — Organic Chemistry. Four hours. 
Two theory and two double periods per week. 
A continuation of Course 131 completing the study of the aro- 
matic hydrocarbons. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 131. 

136 — Food Chemistry. Four hours. 
Three theory and one double period per week. 

This is a brief course in the study of the composition and prop- 
erties of foods: proteins, carbohydrates, fats, salts, etc. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 92. 

160 — Biochemistry. Four hours. 

Two theory periods and two double periods for laboratory each 
week. 

A course designed to give the student knowledge of the chemical 
processes involved in the human body. The chemistry of carbohy- 
drates, proteins, and lipids, including the digestion and metabolism of 
each, is considered. The chemistry of the vital processes such as 
respiration and detoxication are also given attention. The remainder 
of the time is devoted to the study of the chemical composition and 
analyisis of urine and blood. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 130-131-132. 

161 — Biochemistry. Four hours. 

Two theory periods and two double periods for laboratory each 
week. 

A continuation of Chemistry 160. 

162 — Biochemistry. Four hours. 

Two theory periods and two double periods for laboratory each 
week. 

A continuation of Chemistry 161, largely, the study of blood and 
urine. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 161. 

PHYSICS 

Mr. St. Clair 



23 — Survey of Physics. Four hours. 
Four theory periods per week. 



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Physical Sciences and Mathematics 



A brief survey of the field of physics, similar in scope to Chem- 
istry 24 or Biology 22. 

80 — General Physics. Four hours. 

Two theory periods and two double periods per week. 

A study of the physical laws and principles and their practical 
applications. A study of mechanics, hydrostatics, vectors, electricity, 
heat, sound, light, etc. 

81 — General Physics. Four hours. 

Two theory periods and two double periods per week. 

A continuation of Course 80. 

Prerequisite: Physics 80. 

82 — General Physics. Four hours. 

Two theory periods and two double periods per week. 

A continuation of Course 81. 

Prerequisite: Physics 81. 

137 — Household Physics. Four hours. 

Three theory and one double period per week. 

A course in physics especially designed for students of home eco- 
nomics, with emphasis placed upon the application of the principles 
of physics to the home. 

145 — The Technique of Teaching Science. Four hours. 

Four theory periods per week with conferences. 

This course will be of immediate value in giving teachers the 
technique of handling science classes. Selection, organization and pre- 
sentation of subject matter is studied. 

Prerequisite: Science 22, 23, 24, or their equivalent plus a full 
year of some science group and Education 113. 

MATHEMATICS 

Mr. Johnson Mr. Jones Mrs. Jones Dr. Ader Mr. Hurst 

21 — College Arithmetic. Four hours. 

A thorough study of the fundamental operations of arithmetic 
with much practice on applications. 

31 — College Algebra. Four hours. 
A first course in college algebra. 

32 — College Algebra. Four hours. 

A second course in college algebra and continuation of 31. 

35 — Plane Trigonometry. Four hours. 

36 — Spherical Trigonometry. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 35. 

60 — Mathematics of Finance. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: A knowledge of geometric progressions and 
logarithms. This course treats of the mathematical principles of such 
things as building and loan associations, sinking funds, bonds, invest- 
ments, life insurance, installment buying, and the amortization of 
debts. 

75 — Analytic Geometry. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 35. 

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Social Studies 



76 — Analytic Geometry. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 75. This is a continuation of 75. 

100a, b, c, g — Aerial Navigation. One hour each quarter. 

131 — The Teaching of High School Mathematics. Four hours. 

This course should be taken after the student has finished as 
much as is possible of his training in mathematics. This course is de- 
signed to give the student some knowledge of the foundation on which 
mathematics is built, the aims and purposes of teaching it in the high 
school, curriculum problems, the organization and presentation of sub- 
ject matter, methods of teaching, and methods of testing. 

138 — The History of Mathematics. Four hours. 

145 — Statistics. Four hours. 

Average, dispersion, skewness, regression lines and planes, simple 
correlation, linear and non-linear trends and normal curve. 

175 — Differential Calculus. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 75. 

176 — Integral Calculus. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 175. This is a continuation of 175. 

177 — Calculus. Four hours. 

A continuation of Mathematics 175 and 176, emphasizing the ap- 
plications of differential and integral calculus. 

178 — College Geometry. Four hours. 
Geometry of the triangle and the circle. 

180 — Theory of Equations. Four hours. 

185 — Differential Equations. Four hours. 

Simple types of ordinary differential equations of the first and 
second order, linear equations with constant coefficients, applications 
to geometry and physics. 

Prerequisite: Math. 177. 

DIVISION OF SOCIAL STUDIES 

Leon A. Wilber, Acting Chairman 

GEOGRAPHY 

Miss Bolton Dr. Hall 

33 — Principles of Geography. Four hours. 

Required of elementary certificates. Study of the relations be- 
tween natural environment and human life in the various regions of 
the earth. Emphasis on climate. Basis for all further geography study. 

43 — Geography of Selected Countries. Four hours. 

A brief survey of the economic geography of important countries, 
their products and trade relations. Special emphasis on the United 
States. 

110 — Geography of United States and Canada. Four hours. 
Open to sophomores. 

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Social Studies 



118 — Geography of South America, Mexico and the Caribbean 
Countries. Four hours. 

A study of Latin America intended to acquaint the student with 
the geography of regions differing from his own in many respects. 
Open to sophomores. 

130 — Physical Geography. Four hours. 

Students may substitute this course for Geography 33. 

131 — Geology and Geography of Mississippi. Two hours. 

135 — Principles of Human Geography. Four hours. 

Not open to students who have had both Geography 33 and 
130. 

The relation of geographical environment to human activities. Il- 
lustrations from different countries and civilizations to show man's 
dependence on minerals, water bodies, land forms, vegetation and cli- 
mate. Climate as a factor in civilization and the practical economy of 
peoples. 

138 — Geography of Europe. Four hours. 

A study of European countries, their people, resources, products, 
etc., with emphasis on the possibilities of each country for develop- 
ment in a modern economy. 

139 — Asia and Australia. Four hours. 

Method of treatment same as 138. China, Japan and India stress- 
ed. 

140 — Geography of Africa. Two hours. 

145 — Advanced Economic and Commercial Geography. Four 
hours. 

After a brief survey of geographic principles the study deals 
with the leading commodities of world trade, their sources and ex- 
change, and a short description of the countries that enter into this 
trade. 

147 — Human Geography of the South. Four hours. 

A study of the geographical, historical, economic, and social fact- 
ors that have gone into the making of the South as we know it today. 
Also some estimate of economic changes that might better the situ- 
ation, suggested in the light of findings by research experts and 
scientific experiment. 

150 — Global Geography. Four hours. 

A course for advanced students with or without previous geog- 
raphy training. A study of world geography and its significance in 
war and peace. Completely modern and up-to-date material used 
gives the latest viewpoint of geographic and human relationships to 
secure possible adjustments for world peace. 

160 — Geographic Influences in American Development. Four 
hours. 

Recommended for Social Studies majors. A study of the relation 
of geography to the exploration, settlement, and political, industrial, 
and social development of the United States. 

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Social Studies 



HISTORY 

Dr. McLemore Miss W. Jackson Mr. Gonzales Dr. Wilber 

Mr. Steede Mr. Rodemann Dr. Vinnedge 

27— World Civilization, 5000 B. C. to 1650 A. D. Four hours. 

This course is intended as a survey of world civilization from 
pre-historic times to the end of the Religious Wars with the Peace 
of Westphalia in 1648. The main purpose will be to study the trends 
in the history of the world with particular emphasis on their relation 
to present day living. While retaining politics as the most obvious 
strand in the development of human affairs, considerably more em- 
phasis than is customary will be placed upon art, science, economics, 
religion and thought. 

28— World Civilization Since 1650 A. D. Four hours. 

This course is a continuation of History 27. It covers a time span 
of approximately the last 300 years. One half of the work will be de- 
voted to a study of the momentous days of the 20th century with its 
two great world conflicts. Special emphasis will be placed on current 
events. The same approach to history employed in History 27 will be 
applied here. 

29 — Mississippi History. Four hours. 

An introductory course dealing with Mississippi as a province, a 
territory and a state. Required of all Freshmen except History majors 
who will substitute History 109, and Bachelor of Arts candidates. 

61 — American History to 1800. Four hours. 

This course is designed to give the student a survey of our politic- 
al, social and economic history to 1800. 

62— American History 1800 to 1875. Four hours. 
A continuation of History 61 beginning with the Republican rev- 
olution in 1800 and going through the reconstruction period. 

63 — American History Since 1875. Four hours. 
A continuation of History 62. This course begins with the close 
of the reconstruction era and brings the survey down to the present. 

109 — Problems of Mississippi History. Four hours. 

An advanced course dealing with special phases of Mississippi 
history. Particular emphasis is placed on the part Mississippi and 
Mississippians have played in national affairs. Not open to students 
who have had History 29. Required of History majors. 

110 — The Middle Ages. Four hours. 

An advanced course in European history covering the period from 
the creation of the Roman Empire to the beginning of the Renais- 
sance. 

125 — The Teaching of the Social Studies. Four hours. 

Designed for the teacher of the Social Studies. Treats of the 
problems of teaching centered around the teacher, his subjects and his 
classroom difficulties. 

127 — Inter-American Relations. Four hours. 

A brief study of the Hispanic states from 1830 to the present 
with emphasis on the history of the ABC powers, Mexico, and Cuba. 

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Social Studies 



The course deals with the origin and development of the present-day 
problems of Hispanic America in the field of foreign relations. It treats 
of the diplomatic relations of the Hispanic American states with each 
other and primarily with the United States. Topics given intensive 
study are The Monroe Doctrine, Pan-Americanism, Caribbean Prob- 
lems, and Mexican Relations. 

128 — Early American Foreign Relations. Four hours. 

A survey of the foreign policy of the United States from the Rev- 
olution through the Civil War. Particular attention is devoted to the 
Monroe Doctrine and problems of expansion. 

129 — Recent American Foreign Relations. Four hours. 

A continuation of History 128. Covers the period from 1865 to the 
present. Special emphasis is given to imperialism, the World War, 
the League of Nations and the World Court as they affect the United 
States. 

140 — Civil War. Four hours. 

An intensive study of the period 1861-1865. 

142 — Recent American History. Four hours. 

A consideration of the period from 1933 to the present. Units 
studied include labor, tariff and currency, imperial America, trusts, 
World War II, America and Internationalism. 

174 — Early English History. Four hours. 

A survey of ancient and medieval England with emphasis on cus- 
toms, literature, and institutions. Especially recommended for English 
majors. 

175 — Modern English History. Four hours. 

A study of England from the time of the Stuarts. Especial em- 
phasis is placed upon the development of political institutions, the in- 
dustrial revolution, and imperialism. 

176 — Reformation and Revolution. Four hours. 

An advanced course in European history covering generally the 
period from 1500 to 1815 with particular stress on the Lutheran re- 
volt, the Counter-Reformation, the Religious Wars, the French Rev- 
olution, and the Napoleonic regime. 

177 — Recent European History. Four hours. 

A study of the period from 1918 to the present. 

179 — Constitutional History of the United States. Four hours. 

A study of the U. S. Constitution, of the documents, theories, and 
forces that led to its framing, and of the customs, interpretations, 
and amendments that have modified it since it was adopted. Espe- 
cially recommended for pre-law students. 

185— History of the Old South. Four hours. 

A reading, research, and discussion course for students particular- 
ly interested in the institutions and customs of the ante-bellum South. 
Special attention given to slavery, life on the plantation, manners and 
customs. 

190 — English Constitutional History. Four hours. 
A course in the development of English political institutions, and 
governmental administration, and in the rise and growth of democ- 

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Social Studies 



racy in England from Anglo-Saxon times to the establishment of the 
British Commonwealth of Nations. Especially recommended for pre- 
law students. 

GOVERNMENT 

Dr. Wilber Dr. Vinnedge Miss W. Jackson 

25 — American Government. Four hours. 

This course offers a study in the science of government, particular 
attention being given to the origin and development of the federal 
system, and a comparison of this system with those of some of the 
European countries. 

45 — County Government. Four hours. 

This course stresses the increasing importance of county govern- 
ment both in scope of its older functions and in the expansion of ac- 
tivities in new directions. Attention is given to the administration and 
operation of governmental activities in all of its various fields. The in- 
creasing scale of county finances and the steady expansion of county 
activities make an understanding of this part of our governmental sys- 
tem much more important than ever before. 

Special attention will be given to the increasing importance of 
the social services the county government is being called upon to 
render. 

105 — Parliamentary Law and Its Usage. Two hours. 

The aim of this course is to explain the generally accepted rules 
of the conduct of meetings and inform young men and women how to 
organize and conduct business in mass meetings and different kinds 
of societies. 

106 — American Political Parties. Two hours. 

This course is a history of the leading political parties of the 
United States and a study of practical politics in such topics as nomi- 
nating methods, campaigns and elections, party machinery, election 
laws, spoils systems, civil service reform and remedies for evils of 
present day political methods. 

130 — State Government. Four hours. 

This course outlines the organization and problems of state gov- 
ernment in the United States. The different forms of local govern- 
ment are discussed as parts of the state governmental organization 
rather than as independent institutions. Specific application will be 
made to the conditions existing in Mississippi, in trying to obtain a 
true picture of our own state government. 

135 — American Municipal Government. Four hours. 

A study of the principles and systems of municipal government, 
with special stress on the municipal revenue, the municipal budget, 
public safety, city planning, municipal politics, municipal indebtedness 
and the city as a problem in the government. 

145 — Current Problems in Citizenship. Four hours. 

This course is intended to supply a background for intelligent ap- 
preciation of the facts about American government. Topics treated 
are immigration, naturalization, Americanization, race relationships, 
public opinion, unemployment, prohibition, economic and legal status 
of women, war, and peace. 

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Social Studies 



157 — International Politics. Four hours. 

A study of the principles of co-operation among nations, and of 
the structure of some outstanding international organizations, such as 
the United Nations, International Labor Organization, and the League 
of Nations. 

185 — International Law. Four hours. 

Since the World War, an intimate bearing of international law 
upon the peace and prosperity of the world at large has been realized 
by the general public as well as by statesmen and scholars. Hence the 
study of the principles of International Law, with special stress on 
neutrality, methods of warfare, treatment of prisoners of war, mari- 
time commerce, remedial rights and peace treaties. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Mr. Campbell 

The courses in Commerce 127, Government 145, Home Economics 
128, Psychology 139, and Health 196 or 198 may be considered as 
Sociology for meeting requirements for majors and minors if ap- 
proved by the student's advisor. 

63 — Introductory Sociology. Four hours. 

This course is a study of the factors and principles influencing 
the social life of man. An attempt is made to orient students to the 
ways of social thinking and survey the field of sociology. 

Topics discussed: Nature of sociology, geographical factors, bio- 
logical factors, psychological factors, cultural factors, social processes, 
social control, social organization and institutions, and social change 
and progress. 

75 — Rural Sociology. Four hours. 

This course is a study of rural society, its peoples, structure, in- 
stitutions, processes and relations to urban society. 

112 — Current Social Problems. Four hours. 

This course is a general survey of some of the major social prob- 
lems now confronting American society such as family disorganiza- 
tion, physical and mental ill health, economic insecurity, juvenile de- 
linquency and crime, population problems and industrial hazards. Spe- 
cial consideration is given to the cultural background and the social 
significance of these problems as well as to the various public and 
private proposals for their alleviation. 

116 — Rural Social Problems. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Sociology 75 or consent of the instructor. 
This course is an intensive study of the chief maladjustments in 
rural society with special emphasis upon current problems. 

118 — Urban Sociology. Four hours. 

This course will include study of the nature of urban society, the 
impact of industrialization and urbanization on such institutions as 
the family, church, and school, problems of urban life, and the influ- 
ence of the city upon rural areas. 

128 — Criminology. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Sociology 63 or 112 or consent of the instructor. 

This course is a comprehensive treatment of crime, criminals, 

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Social Studies 



punishments, and prisons. Special stress is laid on the history of our 
ideas on crime, criminals and punishments and upon the methods 
whereby such ideas have been applied. A synthesis of existing knowl- 
edge and practices in the field supplies the basis f cr suggestions as to 
the desirable future reforms in the repression of crime and the treat- 
ment of criminals. 

175 — Social Institutions. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Sociology 63 or consent of the instructor. 

This course is a detailed study of the origin and composition of 
the major institutions in society — economic, political, domestic, insti- 
tutions for promoting richer living and institutions for influencing 
public opinion. Some emphasis is placed on social theory. 

176 — Educational Sociology. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: Sociology 63 or 112 or 8 hours in Education or con- 
sent of the instructor. 

This course is an analysis of contemporary social issues which 
affect the school as revealed through the study of current materials 
in the social sciences. 

177— Ethics. Four hours. 

This course is a study of the evolution of moral ideas from prim- 
itive to modern times and a criticism of ethical theories and of social 
institutions such as the state, property, and the family. 

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Dr. Vinnedge 
The aim in offering courses in Religious Education is two-fold: 

(a) It is intended to offer courses for the general student who 
may wish to have a knowledge of the literature of the Bible, and of 
the history of religious expression throughout the world, as a part 
of his cultural and intellectual equipment. 

(b) It is intended to offer special and practical material for the 
student who may wish to engage in some field of Christian service. 

20— Bible I. Two hours. 

A general survey of the Old Testament: its types of literature, 
the general content of its books, and some attention to the Hebrew 
historical movements which form its background. 

22— Bible II. Two hours. 

A general survey of the New Testament life and times, the na- 
ture and content of its books, the ministry of Jesus, and the launching 
of the Christian movement. 

51 — History of Religions. Four hours. 

A study of the grounds for religious belief among men, the 
emergence of tribal and national religions in antiquity, and a survey 
of the principal non-Christian faiths of ancient and modern times. 

121 — The Minor Prophets of Israel. Two hours. 

A study of the life and preachment of the Old Testament proph- 
ets; the social, political, economic, and religious conditions which call- 
ed forth their work; and the relevance of their message to modern 
times. 

145 



Social Studies 



123— The Major Prophets of Israel. Two hours. 
A course similar to 121, with reference primarily to Isaiah, Jere- 
miah, and Ezekiel. 

125 — Sunday School Problems and Methods. Two hours. 

Designed for teachers and administrators of Sunday Schools to 
present methods for facing the difficulties of both teacher and super- 
intendent. 

146 — The Literature of the Bible. Four hours. 

The literary study of the Old and New Testament Scriptures, to- 
gether with a consideration of similar writings that issued from Jew- 
ish writers contemporary with the Biblical authors, and a comparison 
of the Scriptural writings with related types among other peoples. 
This course may be elected as English 146. 



146 



Enrollment 



ENROLLMENT 



Year 



3 

a 



By Quarters 



3 
& 



3 
& 






I 

3 

u 

£ 

s 

3 
02 



By School Years and 
by Calendar Years 



o 0) 



> ,| s 

*P tr "58 

S3 3 O 



.- c u 



1942-43 


347 


336 


313 


374 


1370 


533 


772 


1943-44 


234 


209 


325 


341 


1109 


388 


664 


1944-45 


270 


258 


350 


472 


1350 


422 


722 


1945-46 


303 


451 


695 


1062 


2511 


811 


1518 


1946-47 


1189 


1213 


1395 


1453 


5250 


1569 


1859 


1947-48 


1565 


1510 






3075 








ENROLLMENT FOR 1946-47 

Counties represented 78 

Other states represented , 17 

Enrollment by extension, * 421 

Enrollment by correspondence 1204 

Enrollment of college men in residence 1043 

Enrollment of college women in residence 732 

Enrollment of senior class * 217 

Enrollment of junior class 257 

Enrollment of sophomore class 327 

Enrollment of freshman class 861 

Enrollment post graduates 73 

Enrollment special unclassified 40 

Degrees conferred — 1946-47 162 

Demonstration school enrollment 414 



CERTIFICATES AND DEGREES GRANTED 

Total bachelor degrees granted (beginning in 1922) 3182 

Total diplomas granted (three years, discontinued in 1929) 768 

Total one year certificates granted * 2129 

Total two-year certificates granted 17 

Total enrollment without duplication (1912-1947) 24,750 

147 



Register for 1946-47 



REGISTER FOR 1946-47 

DEGREES GRANTED 

June 2, 1947 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

Name Major Home Address 

Ruby Sue Bush History Porterville 

Richard Hubbard Thames Health Jackson 

John H. Webb, Jr History Columbia 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREE 

Name Major Home Address 

Joy Dorsett Voice —- Hattiesburg 

Anita Gay Sullivan Gibson Piano Mize 

Elaine Swinney Martin Piano Hattiesburg 

Annie Laurie Roberts Piano Hattiesburg 

Jimmie Nell Walker. Piano Hattiesburg 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Name Major Home Address 

Leonard G. Anderson Economics Danville, 111. 

Edward Perry Arnold Health and Phy. Ed..— Hattiesburg 

Leroy Austin Science and History Grenada 

Mrs. W. E. Bexley _ English McLain 

Carol Brantley Commerce Madden 

Frederick Lee Brooks, II -Soc. Studies Meridian 

Sara Margaret Brown Commerce Bay Springs 

Birdie Mae Buntyn English Decatur 

Tommie Jean Byrd Commerce — Neely 

John Allen Cade, Jr. History Lexington 

Katie Louise Calhoun Soc. Studies Mt. Olive 

Louie Cooper Campbell Physical Education Winterville 

John McCallum Carter Soc. Studies Hattiesburg 

Minnie Louise Carter Commerce Hattiesburg 

Mrs. Jamie Anderson Childers Voc. Home Ec. Ripley 

Fannie Will Clark Home Economics Columbia 

Mary Elizabeth Cole Voc. Home Ec Philadelphia 

Glynn L. Cook Physical Education Columbia 

Bessie Elizabeth Crane Commerce Hattiesburg 

Henrietta Koons Darby Soc. Studies Hattiesburg 

W. J. Davis , Health and Phy. Ed Collins 

Sara Elizabeth Dever Commerce Hattiesburg 

Roy Loil Dorman Mathematics * Union 

Evelyn Carol Engbarth Chem. and Math Laurel 

John E. Finch Commerce Ocean Springs 

Doris Ouida Fleming Home Ec. & Science Crandall 

B. Welbur Gibson Chemistry Pontotoc 

Mary Elizabeth Godbold Voc. Home Ec McCall Creek 

Billie Ruth Granberry Health and Phy. Ed.-.Hattiesburg 

Mable Etheridge Grissom History Dorsey 

Frederick Herman HalvorseiL Soc. Studies , Leakesville 

Mary Catherine Hanson Commerce Pass Christian 

148 



Register for 1946-47 



Mrs. Carrie Easterling Hinton Voc. Home Ec Morton 

Mrs. Mary Alice Horn Huff Voc. Home Ec Bay Springs 

T. C. Jackson Soc. Studies Pass Christian 

Ada Maye Johnson Health and Fhy. Ed Purvis 

Alvis C. Johnson Soc. Studies Meridian 

Mrs. Catherine Lightsey Jones Chemistry Pachuta 

Yuvette Kelly Commerce Raleigh 

Meda Elizabeth Lott -Commerce '. Wiggins 

Mrs. Jane Reeves McClelland Commerce Brookhaven 

Olivia Mell McGough Ins. Music Morton 

Hilda Grafton McRaney English and Chem Decatur 

Maui ice Linwood Malone Commerce Lucedale 

Carol Winifred Marsh Music Education Hattiesburg 

Thad Matheny Chemistry Waynesboro 

Jack Montgomery * Chemistry and Biology McComb 

Ruth Essie Nelson Commerce Hattiesburg 

Betty Jean Newman Voc. Home E Meadville 

Jane Odom Music Education Hattiesburg 

Juanita Parsons Music Education Tylertown 

Sam Pierce „ Commerce Collins 

Mrs. Lanita Hurdle Pittman Commerce Holly Springs 

Emma Pauline Porter * Fine Arts McCallCreek 

Roy Rouse History Lucedale 

Willie Alva Rouse History Lucedale 

Mrs. A. W. Sanderson English Laurel 

Robert Vance Scott Soc. Studies Petal 

Mrs. Earle Cecile Anderson Smith-Health and Phy. Ed.— -Waynesboro 

Helen Grace Sparks English Hillsboro 

Elizabeth Claire Steadman Voc. Home Ec. Hattiesburg 

Joe Elbert Stringfellow Soc. Studies Meridian 

Clestian. Taylor Soc. Studies New Orleans, La. 

Bobbie Louise Thompson Voc. Home Ec —. D'Lo 

Dee Elizabeth Thorton Commerce Hattiesburg 

Eugenia Townsend Voc. Home Ec Lena 

Nelda Marie Trigg Commerce Clara 

Myrtis Alene Valentine English *_ Laurel 

Max Wade Soc. Studies Calhoun City 

Mrs. Troy White Commerce Louisville 

August 14, 1947 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

Name Major Home Address 

Frances Eria Murray English Hattiesburg 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Sydney Eugenia Alexander History Perkinston 

Bernadine Arguelles Soc. Studies Biloxi 

Bessie Mills Bane , English Louisville 

Ruby Aline Barnett History Center 

Gladys B. Beeman English Newton 

Bonnie Jean Brantley History Winter Grove 

Elwanda Mormon Brewer Voc. Home Ec Grenada 

Jimmye Lois Taylor Britton Voc. Home Ec —Lake 

Ralph Plynton Brown Commerce Union 



149 



Register for 1946-47 



Name Major Home Address 

Mrs. Robert C. Bruce Voc. Home Ec Hattiesburg 

Mary Lou Butler .*. Geography Ripley 

Powell W. Butler Soc. Studies McCall Creek 

Bessie Jean Carraway Chemistry Porterville 

Cordia Ellen Clark Commerce Summerland 

Helen Burtiel Clark Soc. Studies Seminary 

Mrs. Zella W. Davis Clendenin English Mobile, Ala. 

Elizabeth Clifton Conner Soc. Studies ^— Columbia 

Eddie Carl Copeland Soc. Studies Philadelphia 

Bessie M. Cranford English Collins 

Harvey Louis Davis * History Seminary 

Mildred Louvenia Davis Voc. Home Ec Columbia 

Minnie Inez Davis English Houston 

Eddie Lee Dawson ,Health and Phy. Ed Chester 

Edward Barnard Dever Commerce Hattiesburg 

Charles Harold Dickerson Soc. Studies McComb 

James E. Dubuisson Soc. Studies Cuevas 

Juanita Durr Soc. Studies Wesson 

Edith Faye Easterling__.^— English Moselle 

Ruby Alexander Etheridge History Hattiesburg 

LaNell Middleton Fortenberry English McComb 

LaVelle Cowset Fortenberry Eng. and F. Lang. Tula 

Harmon Aultman Foster Chemistry Hattiesburg 

Mildred Seymour Foster English Biloxi 

Willie Maude Mize Franklin English ___. Harperville 

Marjory Elaine French Mathematics Pass Christian 

Nellie Zula Glenn Mathematics Saupta 

Mrs. Emmett Lee Goff English Moss Point 

Philip Glen Grice Eng. & Soc. Sci. Crystal Springs 

Emmett Harvey Eng. & Soc. Studies Mt. Olive 

Katherine Louise Hill Commerce Meridian 

Alice Bethea Hinton English Ellisville 

Kyle Vardaman Hollingworth Mathematics Philadelphia 

Mogree Hudson English Union 

Velma Sue Johnson...^— English ^— Tylertown 

Charles H. Keys Mathematics Collins 

Gladys Eugenia Kizer Soc. Studies New Site 

Barbara F. Davis Loper Chemistry Hattiesburg 

Roland Loper HistcVy _Vossburg 

Ethyl Lynch English Weir 

Charles Greme McGregor. Commerce Hattiesburg 

S. Vera Case McDaniel „ Commerce Brookhaven 

Mary Kathryn McMullan Mathematics __*. Decatur 

Mac G. McRaney Physical Education Collins 

Guy Millay Magee History Mt. Olive 

Ola Kate Matlock English Little Rock 

Terry e Lee Mooney Voc Home Ec Moselle 

Jessie Hagler Morrison Health & Phy. Ed Hattiesburg 

Arnold F. Nelson _.... History Union 

Coats Steele Nicholls Mathematics New Augusta 

Dahlia Neelo Noel __ Soc Science Hillsboro 

Lanora Lee Palmer English Lumberton 

Maude Golden Pamplin Home Ec Portland, Ark. 

Mary Jane Parker English ..... Moselle 

Edna M. Pearson Soc. Science Nicholson 

Martha Jane Polk ..._.. Soc Studies Columbia 



150 



Register for 1946-47 



Elma F. Pollitz Soc. Studies Biloxi 

Mavis Pearl Rawson English Dossville 

Travisteen Renfroe Voc. Home Ec Belzoni 

William Franklin Riley Soc. Studies Prentiss 

Launa Locke Rutledge ,.._ English Sandersville 

Sawyer S. Sims Health & Phy. Ed Panama City 

Fannie Mae Smith ^ History Hattiesburg 

Laura Wright Stephenson English Enterprise 

Eunice Fay Strother Home Economics Miss. City 

R. G. Sullivan Soc. Studies Mt. Olive 

Mrs. James A. Tanner English Flora 

Ruth French Taylor History Union 

Thomas Hamilton Tedder. Mathematics Meridian 

Eric Llewellyn Thurston Soc. Studies Hattiesburg 

Bertha Lee Walley *____ -English Taylorsville 

Wendell Lewis Ward G. Sci Long Beach 

Mrs. Mattie Williams English ....Pinola 

Caroline Ashford Wilson Voc. Home Ec Jackson 

LIST OF STUDENTS FOR 1946-47 

Aaron, Mrs. Ruby Huff Liberty, Miss ...Soph. 

Abbott, Elzie B Jackson, Miss. Special 

Adams, Lemuel G. Macon, Miss. Fresh. 

Agent, Audine W. Philadelphia, Miss. Junior 

Aikens, Joseph W Lucedale, Miss. Fresh 

Ainsworth, James D._„ Center, Miss. Fresh. 

Ainsworth, Jean Taylorsville, Miss. Soph. 

Ainsworth, LaNita Ruth Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Ainsworth, Mrs. Virgie Mae Brookhaven, Miss. Senior 

Akers, Sophia Lorena Booneville, Miss. Senior 

Alderman, Mrs. James Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Aldridge, Alton T Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh 

Aldridge, Julia Alice Hattiesburg, Miss. -..Fresh. 

Alexander, Edwin M __- — Purvis, Miss. Fresh. 

Alexander, Sarah C Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Alexander, Sydney Eugenia Perkinston, Miss. Senior 

Allbritton, Peggy Joy Mt. Olive, Miss. Fresh. 

Allbritton, Sidney B Mt. Olive, Miss. Fresh. 

Allen, Bessie Mae Bexley, Miss. Post Grad. 

Allen, Mrs. Betty L Junior 

Allen, Mrs. Charles H Pinola, Miss. Junior 

Allen, Mrs. Corrinne Y Gulfport, Miss. Special 

Allen, Mrs. D. C Silver City, Miss. Senior 

Allen, Mrs. E. S.__ Brookhaven, Miss. Senior 

Allen, Jack Donald -Magee, Miss. Soph. 

Allen, Mrs. Justena Rio, Miss. Senior 

Allen, Melionee E .—Lucedale, Miss. Senior 

Allen, Reavis Edwin Gulfport, Miss. Soph. 

Allen, Thomas Wayne Vicksburg, Miss. ....Fresh. 

Allgood, Victor B Heidelberg, Miss. Senior 

Allred, Alia Elizabeth Collins, Miss. Post Grad. 

Allred, Billie Marie ^_ Collins, Miss. Fresh. 

Allred, Madge Collins, Miss. Senior 

Allred, Zeke Brookhaven, Miss. Fresh. 

Amacker, Mrs. A. Poplarville, Miss. Junior 

Baria, Mary Lula. __*. Pascagoula, Miss. Soph. 

151 



Register for 1946-47 



Amason, Rufus O Mt. Olive, Miss. Senior 

Ammons, Billy Ray Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Anderson, Agnes G Gautier, Miss. Post Grad. 

Anderson, Dorrance L Purvis, Miss. Soph. 

Anderson, James Erin Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Anderson, James Louis Handsboro, Miss. Fresh. 

Anderson, Leonard D Danville, 111. Senior 

Anderson, Malcolm D Long Beach, Miss. Junior 

Anderson, Marian Harris Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Anderson, Maude Virginia Meridian, Miss. Post Grad. 

Anderson, Mrs. Opal L Meridian, Miss. ._ Junior 

Anderson, T. V _ Purvis, Miss. Soph. 

Antley, George B., Jr Forest, Miss. Soph. 

Aplin, Arthur Earl Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Applewhite, Lela Allen, Miss. Special 

Archer, Ellie S Meridian, Miss. Junior 

Arendale, Dorothy Helen Hattiesburg, Miss. Post Grad. 

Arguelles, Bernerdine W. Biloxi, Miss. Senior 

Armstrong, Auudie Ferrell Biloxi, Miss. Senior 

Arnett, Harold A., Jr. Baton Rouge, La ..... Soph. 

Arnold, Edward P Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Arnold, Mrs. Grady ___ Meadville, Miss. Junior 

Arrington, Sammy Cecil Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Arsement, Leo Anthony Port Arthur, Texas Soph. 

Asberry, Ann Bledsoe Mobile, Ala. Junior 

Ashcraft, Celine F . Bay St. Louis, Miss. Senior 

Ashley, Hazel Leach Pascagoula, Miss. Special 

Ashley, Mrs. Margaret Meadville, Miss. Fresh. 

Astleford, Clark Arnold Biloxi, Miss. Fresh 

Attebery, Otis F Mobile, Ala. Fresh. 

Atwood, Linnie Mae Seminary, Miss. Junior 

Aultman, Mrs. Gladys S. Seminary, Miss. Soph. 

Austin, Mrs. Helen Mendenhall, Miss. Senior 

Austin, Leroy P Tchula, Miss. Senior 

Austin, Ruthlyn Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Autrey, Louin L _ Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Avent, James K., Jr Grenada, Miss. Senior 

A vera, Chester Lee, Jr........ State Line, Miss. Senior 

Avery, Mildred Corinne Purvis, Miss. Fresh. 

Avery, Theron M Purvis, Miss. .-Junior 

Backstrom, Jean McLain, Miss. Post Grad. 

Bailey, Bobbye Nell Ellisville, Miss. Senior 

Bailey, Reed Lewis Oakland, Calif. Fresh. 

Baird, Lillian _■ .—Jackson, Miss. ... Fresh. 

Baird, Mary B _— — Brookhaven,, Miss. Senior 

Baker, John B., Jr Vossburg, Miss. Soph. 

Baker, John Rice Natchez, Miss. Fresh. 

Baker, Orion S., Jr _ __ Ocean Springs, Miss. Junior 

Ball, Alex D .-Leakesville, Miss. __ Soph. 

Ball, Mrs. Hollis ....... ______ -Columbia, Miss. _1_ ....Soph. 

Ball, James A., Jr __.... Leakesville, Miss. Soph. 

Ball, James Frank..... ._.: ..Hattiesburg, Miss. —Fresh. 

Ball, Mrs. N. E. Kokomo, Miss. Senior 

Bane, Mrs. Everitt Louisville, Miss. Senior 

Banks, Charles Jerome Mendenhall, Miss. Fresh. 

Barber, Doris Evelyn Newhebron, Miss. Junior 

Barberi, Daniel E Pensacola, Fla Fresh. 



152 



Register for 1946-47 



Barich, Joseph P Biloxi, Miss. ...Junior 

Barksdale, Johnnie Helen Columbia, Miss. ........ Junior 

Barlow, Allison Derwood Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Barlow, Archie Roland, Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Barnes, Hugh Banks Leakesville, Miss. Junior 

Barnes, James Stinson Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Barnes, Kinnon W Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Barnes, Mrs. Virginia M Lucedale, Miss. Junior 

Barnes, Willia Gretchen Rienzi, Miss. Junior 

Barnett, Aline Center, Miss. Senior 

Barrett, Elouise C -• Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Barrett, Hollis H Purvis, Miss. Senior 

Barron, Frances Hattiesburg, Miss. Post Grad. 

Barron, James W. Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Barron, Jessie Mae Crystal Springs, Miss. .Post Grad. 

Barron, Willie Lou Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Barter, Mrs. Odie McComb, Miss. Junior 

Baskin, Eston Jackson, Miss. Soph. 

Bass, Frances Ray Seminary, Miss. Fresh. 

Bass, Mrs. Hoyt F Lumberton, Miss. Junior 

Bass, Julia Clare Biloxi, Miss. Senior 

Bass, Robert M., Jr , Moselle, Miss. Junior 

Bates, Mrs. L. F . Morgantown, Miss. Post Grad. 

Batson, Alice Wiggins, Miss. Junior 

Batson, Sallie H Wiggins, Miss. Junior 

Battle, Erma G McComb, Miss. Junior 

Baxter, Kathleen , — Lumberton, Miss. Junior 

Baxter, Lucy E Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Baylis, George R Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Baylis, Wiley J. Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Beach, Jacob H Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Beall, Houston P Lumberton, Miss. ...Soph. 

Beam, Frank McComb, Miss. Junior 

Beard, Arthur O'Gwynn Leakesville, Miss. Fresh. 

Beard, Latson D Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Beard, Omer Lee Foxworth, Miss. Fresh. 

Beard, Warren P State Line, Miss. Fresh. 

Beard, Willie Ira, Jr. _^_ Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Beatty, Preston W Newton, Miss. Senior 

Beech, Louise R Laurel, Miss. Junior 

Beech, Thomas R Laurel, Miss. Junior 

Beeman, Mrs. Gladys B Newton, Miss. Senior 

Belka, Fannie P Gulf port, Miss. Junior 

Belka, Joe Edward Gulf port, Miss. Fresh. 

Bell, James Albert Magee, Miss. Fresh. 

Bell, J. C Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Bell, Mrs. L. K Bude, Miss. Senior 

Bell, Philip A Magee, Miss. Fresh. 

Bellipani, Frank Centreville, Miss. Soph. 

diBenedetto, Dominic J Bay St. Louis, Miss. Soph. 

Bennett, Claude H _— Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Bennett, Dorothy Velma Lena, Miss. Senior 

Bennett, Mary Ellen Vicksburg, Miss. —._. Fresh. 

Bennett, Maude Snowden Gulfport, Miss. Special 

Bennett, Michael D Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Bennett, Robert P., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Bennett, Roy A. Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 



153 



Register for 1946-47 



Benson, Ernest C New Augusta, Miss. Fresh. 

Benton, Bobby Therell Mt. Olive, Miss. Fresh. 

Bernard, Raoul J Thibodaux, La. Fresh. 

Berry, Alvin G Prentiss, Miss. Fresh. 

Berry, Jerry Edward Sandy Hook, Miss. Junior 

Berry, John D Sandy Hook, Miss. Soph. 

Berry, William Carl Foxworth, Miss. Fresh. 

Bessey, Mrs. Veronica L ^— Biloxi, Miss. Senior 

Bethea, Ada Hattiesburg, Miss. Post Grad. 

Bethea, Dorothy Jeanne Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Bethea, John J Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Bethea, Stanford E Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Beverly, Norma Carolyn Laurel, Miss. Junior 

Bevon, Joseph John Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Bexley, Mrs. Dennie Royals McLain, Miss. Senior 

Bingham, William L Newton, Miss. Fresh. 

Bishop, Alner L Ovett, Miss. ....Senior 

Bishop, Mrs. H. E Moselle, Miss. Junior 

Bishop, Ruthie L .... Louin, Miss. Junior 

Bittle, Edgar C Ocean Springs, Miss. Soph. 

Bivin, Charlotte Lou Bucatuima, Miss. Junior 

Black, David P Purvis, Miss. Fresh. 

Black, Gordon C Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 



Black, Herbert Nelson. 

Black, Mrs. M. A 

Black, Oscar B., Jr 

Blacklidge, Elden Ray. 

Blade, Francis R 

Blair, Joe T 



Blair, John Robert- 
Blake, Joseph A.— 
Blanton, John C— 
Bledsoe, Alvia G.- 



Blount, Charles B 

Blue, Mary Elizabeth 

Blue, Myrtle 

Boatner, Lura u 

Bodman, Sally. 



Boehm, Edward C 

Bogdahn, Charles H 

Boggan, Mrs. W. E 

Bolian, Edwin B. 

Bond, Dorothy _. 

Bond, E Id on 

Bond, Mrs. Eva M 

Book, Elloyise 

Boone, Leola M 

Borde, Charles W 

Borde, Joe Mary.-. 
Bostick, Emily. 



_„Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

._Meridian, Miss. Junior 

__Purvis, Miss. ^_. Soph. 

„Gulfport, Miss. Fresh. 

.Laurel, Miss. Fresh. 

Quitman, Miss. Fresh. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Columbia, Miss. Fresh, 

Collins, Miss. Fresh. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Brookhaven, Miss. Junior 

Brookhaven, Miss. Special 

Gloster, Miss. Senior 

Hattiesburg, Miss. ___^— Fresh. 

Columbus, Ohio .... Junior 

Pascagoula, Miss. Fresh. 

Meadville, Miss. Senior 

Summit, Miss. Junior 

Jackson, Miss. Senior 

Nicholson, Miss. Senior 

Nicholson, Miss. Junior 



Bosworth, George C 
Bott, Minor L. 



Hazlehurst, Miss. Soph. 

Picayune, Miss. Senior 

Bogalusa, Miss. Soph. 

__Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Puerto Cortez, Honduras Post Grad. 



.Laurel, Miss. , Fresh. 

.Petal, Miss. Soph. 

:Petal, Miss. Junior 

.Bailey, Miss. Soph. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Bounds, Thomas Earl.... Shubuta, Miss Soph. 



Bott, Norma Allegra. 

Bounds, Clarence D 

Bounds, John L .*_ 



Bounds, Thomas Everan Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 



154 



Register for 1946-47 



Bounds, William Edwin Shubuta, Miss. — Soph. 

Bourn, Ella Mae Oakvale, Miss. Soph. 

Bourne, Belton Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Boutwell, Emma Ellen Newton, Miss. Fresh. 

Boutwell, Gertrude * Pascagoula, Miss. Senior 

Boutwell, Myrtis D Wesson, Miss. Junior 

Bowen, Mrs. Owen Richton, Miss. Junior 

Bowlin, Hugh L McComb, Miss. Post Grad. 

Bowling, John L Raleigh, Miss. Fresh. 

Boyd, Dolesca W .Smithdale, Miss. __>. Soph. 

Boyd, Dorothy T J _ Carthage, Miss. Junior 

Boyd, Eleanor Rebecca Laurel, Miss. Junior 

Boyd, Emma Lawrence Pelahatchie, Miss. Senior 

Boyd, Iris C Jayess, Miss. Senior 

Boyd, Jewel G Collins, Miss. : Junior 

Boyd, Mary Elizabeth Raleigh, Miss. Soph. 

Boyd, Verde Collins, Miss. Soph. 

Boyett, Gladys May _Sallis, Miss. Soph. 

Boykin, W. Clayton Burns, Miss. Junior 

Boykin, William B Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Bozeman, Florence S Jayess, Miss. Junior 

Bracey, Mavis Juanita Foxworth, Miss. Senior 

Bradley, Mary Evelyn Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Bradley, Rae Ellen Wade, Miss. Post. Grad. 

Bradshaw, Betty ^_ Tylertown, Miss. Fresh. 

Bradshaw, Emma Jean Liberty, Miss. —Fresh. 

Brandt, Mary E Pass Christian, Miss. Special 

Brantley, Bonnie Jean Walnut Grove, Miss. Senior 

Brantley, Carol Madden, Miss. Senior 

Branton, James A Columbia, Miss. Soph. 

Braswell, Betty Faye Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Bray, Scottie Roberta * Houlka, Miss. Junior 

Breed, Arthur Joe Gulfport, Miss. Soph. 

Breeland, Mrs. W. M Biloxi, Miss. Junior 

Breland, Beatrice Carriere, Miss. Fresh. 

Breland, Betty Faye Raleigh, Miss. Soph. 

Breland, Horace Theo McDonald, Miss. Junior 

Breland, Katie Olivia Brooklyn, Miss. Soph. 

Breland, Lois Edith Perkinston, Miss. Senior 

Breland, Marvin Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Breland, Mrs. Preston Neely, Miss. Junior 

Breland, Mrs. Viola T Wiggins, Miss. Junior 

Brenke, Norma Jean Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Brewer, Dorothy Bernice Shubuta, Miss. Junior 

Brewer, Mrs. Elwanda M. Longview, Miss. Senior 

Brewer, James Earl Cascilla, Miss. Soph. 

Brewer, Juanita __Cascilla, Miss. Fresh. 

Bridges, Lee Ora Jackson, Miss. Post Grad. 

Briggs, Mrs. Ruth DeKalb, Miss. —-Junior 

Briggs, Sara Beth Scooba, Miss. Junior 

Brister, Dixie Kathleen Ruth, Miss. Junior 

Brister, Doris M Ruth, Miss. Junior 

Brister, Minnie M , Brookhaven, Miss. Soph. 

Britt, Mrs. Ethel Mae Brookhaven, Miss. Junior 

Britt, Marguerite Hailey Wesson, Miss. Junior 

Britton, Edward L., Jr Carson, Miss. Fresh. 

Britton, Jimmye Lois Lake, Miss. Senior 



155 



Register for 1946-47 



Britton, Walter C, Jr Mobile, Ala. _- Soph. 

Brock, Evelyn E Tylertown, Miss. Senior 

Brock, Helen E Drew, Miss. Soph. 

Brock, John Robert -.— Quitman, Miss. Fiesh. 

Brock, Ollie Pearl Tylertown, Miss. Soph. 

Block, Mrs. W. S Center, Miss. Junior 

Brogan, Jimmie W Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Brogan, Paul H Petal, Miss. Fresh. 

Brooks, Fred L., Jr Meridian, Miss. ►. Senior 

Broom, H. T., Jr Columbia, Miss. Soph. 

Broome, Ruby June Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Broome, Vondee S Sumrall, Miss. Soph. 

Brown, Cecil D Millry, Ala. Fresh. 

Brown, Frank K Millry, Ala. _._..— Soph. 

Brown, Harry C Petal, Miss. Fresh. 

Brown, Hilbun J. .._ Magee, Miss. Soph. 

Brown, Hilton L Columbia, Miss. Soph. 

Brown, Lona Jayne Union, Miss. Special 

Biown, Lynus W Bogue Chitto, Miss. —Fresh. 

Brown, Millard F., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Brown, Ralph P Union, Miss. Senior 

Brown, Ray T -Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Brown, Mrs. Roy M. Pachuta, Miss. Junior 

Brown, Sara M Bay Springs, Miss. Senior 

Brown, W. David, Jr.— ^_ Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Bruce, Robert C Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Bruce, Mrs. Robert Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Brueck, Mrs. Ida Blue Brookhaven, Miss. Special 

Biumfield, Mrs. Ellis Tylertown, Miss. Junior 

Bryan, Robert Eric Lucedale, Miss. Junior 

Bryant, Bessie Taylor Seminary, Miss. Post Grad. 

Bryant, Chappell ^ Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Bryant, Edna Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Bryant, Emily Jean Terry, Miss. Senior 

Bryant, Ermon H. Moselle, Miss. Junior 

Bryant, Felton N Moselle, Miss. Junior 

Bryant, Gerald L Hattiesburg, Miss. .... Soph. 

Bryant, Mrs. Lillie F Baxterville, Miss. Soph. 

Bryant, Mrs. Ophia C Mize, Miss. Senior 

Buchanan, James 0. Lucedale, Miss. Soph. 

Buck, Glenn Gulf port, Miss. Fresh. 

Buckley, Cruit R Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Buckley, Mary Frances Enterprise, Miss. Fresh. 

Buffington, Bobby Magee, Miss. Fresh. 

Bugg, C. V — -Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Bullard, David G Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Bullard, Mollie Jones Brookhaven, Miss. Fresh. 

Bullock, Mrs. Norma S. Tylertown, Miss. J — Junior 

Bunker, Bettye B Picayune, Miss. Soph. 



Buntyn, Birdie Mae 

Buntyn, Edna E 

Burchfield, John H 

Burdette, James L. 

Burdette, Joseph R 

Burge, Mrs. Flossie Smith... 

Burke, Mrs. Mae G Picayune, Miss. Fresh. 

Burkett, Willard Ray Petal, Miss. Fresh. 

156 



Decatur, Miss. Senior 

Decatur, Miss. Senior 

Carthage, Miss. Senior 

Columbia, Miss. . Fresh. 

Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

.Carriere, Miss. Junior 



Register for 1946-47 



Burks, Delos H Picayune, Miss. Senior 

Burnaman, Robert K Gulfport, Miss. .— Soph. 

Burnett, Mattie Olivia Waynesboro, Miss. Soph. 

Burns, Floyd Louise Burns, Miss. Fresh. 

Burns, Mira Frances Harperville, Miss. Junior 

Burns, Ralph V Mt. Olive, Miss. Fresh. 

Burris, Ann Hewitt - ;Hattiesburg, Miss. Special 

Burris, Claudia M Smithdale, Miss. Special 

Burris, Raiford Magnolia, Miss. Junior 

Burrow, Laura Ozell Smithville, Miss. Senior 

Burt, Jack C Philadelphia, Miss. Soph. 

Busby, Mrs. D. C Mize, Miss. Soph. 

Busby, Mrs. E. L Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Bush, Millard Hattiesburg, Miss. Special 

Bush, Ruby Sue _>.— Porterville, Miss. Senior 

Bush, Mrs. W. W McComb, Miss. Post Grad. 

Butcher, Lynnie I Biloxi, Miss. Senior 

Butler, Calvin Wesson, Miss. Fresh. 

Butler, Dale Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Butler, Dennis M « Mize, Miss. Fresh. 

Butler, Mary Lou Fernwood, Miss. Senior 



Butler, Powell W.- 
Butler, Ruth Ann... 

Butts, John W 

Bynum, Floyd F. 



McCall Creek, Miss. Senior 

Hattiesburg, Miss. . Fresh 

Raymond, Miss. Senior 

Shivers, Miss. Junior 

Bynum, Katie Ruth— .^ Laurel, Miss. Fresh. 

Bynum, Mildred A Prentiss, Miss. Junior 

Byrd, Mary Olivet Mt. Olive, Miss. Junior 

Byrd, Ralph E Lucedale, Miss. Fresh. 

Byrd, Tommie Jean Neely, Miss. Senior 

Byrd, Mrs. Vivian A. Lumberton, Miss. Post Grad. 

Byrns, Billy Joe . .Wiggins, Miss. Soph. 

Cade, John A., Jr _. Lexington, Miss. --Senior 

Cain, Mary Rose Perkinston, Miss. Junior 

Caldwell, Arthur H. Richton, Miss. Senior 

Caldwell, Lamar Decatur, Miss. Senior 

Calhoun, Mrs. Betha Read Louin, Miss. Junior 

Calhoun, Doris Faye Jayess, Miss. Junior 

Calhoun, Katie Louise Mt. Olive, Miss. Senior 

Callahan, Willie D *_ Carthage, Miss. Soph. 

Callender, Cecila F. Howell Wesson, Miss. ..— Senior 

Cameron, Mary Lois Purvis, Miss. Soph. 



Campbell, Mrs. Clyde B.- 
Campbell, Edward L 

Campbell, Hiram L 

Campbell, Hubert F 

Campbell, Jeane M.- 
Campbell, Louie- 



.Wiggins, Miss. Senior 

-—...Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Meridian, Miss. Junior 

Benton, Miss. Junior 

.Ocean Springs, Miss. Junior 

.Winterville, Miss. Senior 



Campbell, Maggie Smith Petal, Miss. Senior 

Campbell, Robert C Forest Hill, Tenn. Fresh. 

Campbell, Roderick E. Jackson, Miss. — . Fresh. 

Campbell, William H Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Cannon, Mary Ruth McComb, Miss. Senior 

Caraway, Bessie Jean Porterville, Miss. Senior 

Caraway, Melba C Eastabuchie, Miss. Fresh. 

Carithers, Christine — Charleston, Miss. Senior 

Carley, Cavie Margarite Purvis, Miss. .: Special 



157 



Register for 1946-47 



Carley, June 

Carlisle, Rachel E 

Carmichael, William M. 

Carney, Camille P. 

Carpenter, Cecil M 

Carpenter, Clinton H. 

Carpenter, James F. , 

Carpenter, James Ray 

Carpenter, Mary Elizabeth. 

Carpenter, Nelda J 

Carr, George E 

Carr, Joe W., Jr 

Carr, Martha Elizabeth 

Carraway, Charles G. 

Carroll, Edwin J 

Carroll, Maxwell G 

Carroza, Falco A. 

Carruth, Mellgwin H. 

Carter, Burl D 

Carter, Ellen 

Carter, Mrs. H. L 

Carter, James H 

Carter, Jean 

Carter, John A. P 

Carter, John M 

Carter, Maxine 

Carter, Minnie Louise 

Carter, Ray F 

Carter, Sammie Jean... _^~ 

Carter, Mrs. Susie D. 

Carter, Vivian Jane 

Case, Ernest 

Case, Mary Jane 

Cason, Otis A 

Catlett, Mrs. Nona Cross. 

Caughman, Mrs. D. W.. 

Caulk, Tressie Crane ... 

Causey, Susie L 

Cawley, James 

Chain, Fledell 

Chambers, Pattie Louise. 
Chandler, Robert L., Jr.... 

Chapman, William W. 

Chatham, Edith 

Chiecino, Joseph R * 

Childers, Jamie A. 

Chinn, Wm. David 

Chisolm, Katherine 

Chisolm, Titia Beth 

Christian, James Aubrey 

Cirlot, Betty 

Clapp, Martin M 

Clark, Cordia E.„._ 

Clark, Dorothy Nell 

Clark, Edwin D 

Clark, Fannie Will 

Clark, Faye 



.Richton, Miss. Junior 

.Collins, Miss. Junior 

.Meridian, Miss. Fresh. 

-Crystal Springs, Miss. Junior 

.Millry, Ala. Fresh. 

.Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

.Booneville, Miss. . Fresh. 

.Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

.Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

.Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

.Mt. Olive, Miss. Soph. 

.Mt. Olive, Miss. Soph. 

.Macon, Miss. Senior 

.Carson, Miss. Fresh. 

.Beaumont, Miss. Soph. 

.Beaumont, Miss. Soph. 

.McKeesport, Pa. Senior 

.Summit, Miss. Senior 

McLaurin, Miss. Fresh. 

Philadelphia, Miss. Junior 

Pascagoula, Miss. Soph. 

— Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Petal, Miss. _*_ Fresh. 

McLaurin, Miss. Fresh. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Philadelphia, Miss. Senior 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Collins, Miss. Fresh. 

Philadelphia, Miss. Junior 

Wade, Miss. Senior 

McLaurin, Miss. Junior 

— Brookhaven, Miss. Fresh. 

Brookhaven, Miss. Senior 

Clewiston, Fla. .. Soph. 

....Meridian, Miss. Post Grad. 

Silver Creek, Miss. Fresh. 

— Pascagoula, Miss. Special 

Waynesboro, Miss. Senior 

Beaumont, Miss. Junior 

__Mt. Olive, Miss. Fresh. 

McLeod, Miss. Senior 

.Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

..JBay St. Louis, Miss Fresh. 

Soso, Miss. Senior 

... .Berwyn, Pa. Fresh. 

Ripley, Miss. ... -_ Senior 

__Biloxi, Miss. Fresh. 

Meridian, Miss. Senior 

Meridian, Miss. Fresh. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Moss Point, Miss. Special 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Summerland, Miss. Senior 

Sumrall, Miss. Junior 

__Sumrall, Miss. Soph. 

— Columbia, Miss. ... ^ Senior 

.—Purvis, Miss. Soph. 

158 



Register for 1946-47 



Clark, Freeman Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Clark, Helen Seminary, Miss. Senior 

Clark, James Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Clark, Josie Biookhaven, Miss. Post Grad. 

Clark, Julian -Stonewall, Miss. Soph. 

Clark, Leo Biloxi, Miss. Fresh. 

Clark, Mrs. Mildred S .-/Stonewall, Miss. Senior 

Clark, Savella Macon, Miss. Soph. 

Clark, Tillon E Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Clarke, Irene Sumrall, Miss. Fresh. 

Clarke, Mrs. Roy R Carlisle, Miss. Post Grad. 

Clay, Cyril M Noxapater, Miss. Fresh. 

Clay, James P — - Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Clay, John Pontotoc, Miss. Soph. 

Clement, Oscar Eugene Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Clement, Robert A Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Clendenin, Zella Wayne Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Cleveland, Bonnie Jean _-— Prentiss, Miss. Soph. 

Cleveland, Robert H Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Cleveland, Mrs. T. B Tylertown, Miss. Senior 

Clifton, Phoebe K Biloxi, Miss. Special 

Clinton, Paul T Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Cloy, Stella Bude, Miss. Soph. 

Coalson, N. E Louisville, Miss. Senior 

Coalson, Mrs. N. E. Quitman, Miss. Senior 

Cochran, James R Jackson, Miss. Fresh. 

Cochran, Mrs. Lois Wiggins, Miss. Fresh. 

Cochran, Mrs. W. Lucedale, Miss. Post Grad. 

Coghlan, Robert E Philadelphia, Miss. Junior 

Cohen, Harold Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Cole, Elizabeth Philadelphia, Miss. Senior 

Cole, Jon Doris - Collins, Miss. Junior 

Cole, Lena Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Cole, S. D Collins, Miss. Junior 

Coleman, Addie L Carpenter, Miss. .... Junior 

Coleman, Donald V Kreole, Miss. Fresh. 

Collier, Jake C Lowell, Mich. Fresh. 

Collier, Levy Carthage, Miss. Fresh. 

Collier, Mrs. Mildred S Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Collier, Robert L Petal, Miss. ...-Junior 

Collins, Annabelle Gulfport, Miss. Fresh. 

Collins, Mrs. Elsie S Bude, Miss. Junior 

Collins, Kenneth C Long Beach, Miss. Soph. 

Collins, Langston J a Gulfport, Miss. Fresh. 

Collins, Mrs. R. C Sumrall, Miss. Soph. 

Collins, Robert E Ellisville, Miss. Senior 

Collins, Robert Ralph Laurel, Miss. Soph. 

Colson, Amanthius May Bay St. Louis, Miss. Special 

Combest, Louie E West Enterprise, Miss. Fresh. 

Commiskey, Hugh W., Jr. Hattiesburg, Miss. .. Fresh. 

Cone, Walter Faye Magee, Miss. Soph. 

Conerly, Patsy .__ Gloster, Miss. Fresh. 

Conn, Gertrude W Gallman, Miss. ^ Senior 

Conner, Betty C Columbia, Miss. Senior 

Conwill, Erval Fulton, Miss. Junior 

Cook, Audrey M Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Cook, Dorothy Nell Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 



159 



Register for 1946-47 



Cook, Frances B — Pascagoula, Miss. Senior 

Cook, Glynn Leon Columbia, Miss. .- Senior 

Cook, Jack E Petal, Miss. Fresh. 

Cook, James Graham Birmingham, Ala. Junior 

Cook, Jimmie Louie Hattiesburg, Miss. _...— Soph. 

Cook, Marie Louise . Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Cook, Woodie Duane ..Leakesville, Miss. Fresh. 

Cook, Yvonne Magnolia, Miss. Junior 

Cooksey, Betty Jean Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Cooksey, Mrs. Tommie Lou.... Lexington, Miss. Senior 

Cooley, Clyde V Lucedale, Miss. Fresh. 

Cooley, Mrs. Ethel K Lucedale, Miss. Senior 

Copeland, Addie Belle Philadelphia, Miss. ......Senior 

Copeland, Eddie Carl Philadelphia, Miss. Senior 

Copeland, James T Ellisville, Miss. Fresh. 

Corr, Lucile Columbus, Miss. Senior 

Corson, Mrs. Mary U. ^ Laurel, Miss. Junior 

Cospelich, George A Long Beach, Miss. Fresh. 

Costley, Nell D Meadville, Miss. Senior 

Costley, Mrs. W. L . Bude, Miss. Senior 

Cothen, Joseph A Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Cothen, Lois Hattiesburg, Miss. Special 

Cothern, Joe . Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Cothern, Mrs. Joe Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Cottingim, Mary Ella Gulf port, Miss. _- Special 

Cotton, Dwain _Vicksburg, Miss. Soph. 

Coughlin, James M. Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Cowand, Hubert Bay St. Louis, Miss. Fresh. 

Cox, Frederick H _» Bolton, Miss. Senior 

Cox, Gayle B Perkinston, Miss. Soph. 

Cox, Gwendolyn Bolton, Miss. Fresh. 

Cox, Hilda Gean Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Cox, Jacqueline Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Cox, Zoe Belle ^. Pascagoula, Miss. Special 

Craft, Noel D Lucedale, Miss. Junior 

Craft, Mrs. Noel D Lucedale, Miss. . Soph. 

Craft, Onnie Lou Weathersby, Miss. Junior 

Craft, Vernie Nell Hattiesburg, Miss. .... ^— _ Soph. 

Craft, Mrs. Winston Soso, Miss. Junior, 

Craig, Esther ., — Pulaski, Miss. Junior 

Crane, Elizabeth .Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Crane, Harold E Gulfport, Miss. Fresh. 

Cranford, Bessie M. iCollins, Miss. Senior 

Cranford, Mrs. C. A Hattiesburg, Miss. ..—Fresh. 

Cranford, William S Taylorsville, Miss. Senior 

Crawford, Clara May ! Columbia, Miss. Junior 

Crawford, John J..—. Memphis, Tenn. __.. Senior 

Crimm, Marvin A Morton, Miss. Soph. 

Cronia, George S Vicksburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Cronia, James D Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Crook, Mrs. Ruby M. Crosby, Miss. Junior 

Cross, Wright W Petal, Miss. Fresh. 

Crout, Cavie C .___ Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Crump, Mrs. Spencer Mt. Olive, Miss. „ Post Grad. 

Csaszar, Charlie, Jr Sumrall, Miss. Fresh. 

Csaszar, Julius Sumrall, Miss. .: Fresh. 

Cubley, Harold B Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

160 



Register for 1946-47 



Cubley, John E., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Cuevas, Doris E Picayune, Miss. Junior 

Cuevas, Hazel L._. Saucier, Miss. Special 

Cumbest, Queenie F Paseagoula, Miss. Soph. 

Cupit, Betty Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Cupit, Mrs. Edna Earle Union Church, Miss. Soph. 

Cupit, Thomas F Union Church, Miss. Junior 

Curley, John P Columbus, Ohio Fresh. 

Currie, Carloyn Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Currie, Edward Alex, Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Currie, Edward James Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Curry, Dot Mae Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Curry, George C Hattiesburg, Miss. ... Junior 

Curry, Jean Marie Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Curtis, Madelyn Biloxi, Miss. Special 

Cyr, Iris S. ,. Perkinston, Miss. Junior 

Dabbs, Daniel W Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Dabbs, Rita C Quitman, Miss. ^— Soph. 

Dale, Charles H Lucedale, Miss. Fresh. 

Dale, John L _- Lucedale, Miss. Fresh. 

Dale, Tommy Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Dallas, Winifred Ruth Little Rock, Miss. Senior 

Daniel, Mrs. George T ..—Moselle, Miss. Senior 

Dantin., H. Paul Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Darby, Henrietta K Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Daughdrill, Mrs. J. L Neely, Miss. Fresh. 

Daughtery, Bobbye _ Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Daughtrey, Otis Glenn Petal, Miss. Fresh. 

Daves, John C Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Daves, Lillie Margaret Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

David, Irma Lee S Perkinston, Miss. Senior 

Davidge, Patricia Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Davidge, William F Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Davion, Ernest J Long Beach, Miss. Fresh. 



Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 



Mrs. Appie Seminary, Miss. Soph. 

Barbara F Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Betty Joe West Enterprise, Miss. Fresh. 

Delia G Port Gibson, Miss. Junior 

Mrs. D. Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior, 

Doris A Lucedale, Miss. Junior 

Mrs. Emily Pascagoula, Miss. Special 

Eva Ladnier Ocean Springs, Miss. Junior 

Harold A Lucedale, Miss. Fresh. 

Harvey L Seminary, Miss. * Senior 

Inez ..Houston, Miss. Senior 

James H Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Johnnie Merle Carriere, Miss. Junior 

Lula B Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Mildred Louvenia Columbia, Miss. Senior 

Neva C Meadville, Miss. Soph. 

Mrs. Otis Gulfport, Miss. Soph. 

Peggy Jean Rose Hill, Miss. Junior 

R. L Baxterville, Miss. Soph. 

Ruby Rae Yazoo City, Miss. Fresh. 

W. J Miami, Fla. Senior 

William R Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Vital Lee Rienzi, Miss. Senior 

161 



Register for 1946-47 



Dawes, Mary Alice * Pascagoula, Miss. Junior 

Dawson, Bobbie Jean Liberty, Miss. Fresh. 

Dawson, Eddie Lee Chester, Miss. Senior 

Day, Thomas D Collins, Miss. Fresh. 

Dean, Johnie Vincent Agricola, Miss. Fresh. 

Dean, Mrs. Lydia V Lucedale, Miss. Fresh. 

Dear, Mrs. W. A Harrisville, Miss. Senior 

Dearman, Dorothy Dean Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Dearman, Mrs. Jesse W ^...Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Dearman, Marjorie M Forest, Miss. Post Grad. 

Deen, Sammie Nell Gulfport, Miss. Fresh. 

Deer, Vernelle L Jayess, Miss. Soph. 

DeMent, Robert T Boothton, Ala. Senior 

Dennard, Mrs. F. E McComb, Miss. Fresh. 

Dennis, Dorothy Jean New Augusta, Miss. Junior 

Dennis, Mrs. Eloyse D Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Dennis, Harry V ., Meridian, Miss. Post Grad. 

Dennison, Mrs. Lucille M. Ocean Springs, Miss. Special 

Denny, Mary Irene Pascagoula, Miss. Senior 

Denson, Margaret Nell Sumrall, Miss. Senior 

Dever, Edward B Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Dever, Sarah Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Diaz, Gerold J , Biloxi, Miss. Fresh. 

Dickens, Quinn P Collins, Miss. Fresh. 



Dickerson, Mrs. Alice. 
Dickerson, Charles H.- 
Dickson, Mrs. J. D 

Dickson, Joe Sharp. 



Quentin, Miss. Special 

Liberty, Miss. Senior 

Lucedale, Miss. Soph. 

Mt. Olive, Miss. Soph. 

Dickson, Mary Ruth—. Mt. Olive, Miss. Fresh. 

Dietz, James L ^___ Beaumont, Miss. Senior 

Dillard, Edward C, Jr Heidelberg, Miss. Soph. 

Dixon, Myrtle Brookhaven, Miss. Soph. 

Dixon, Robert Lee Moss Point, Miss. Fresh. 

Doby, Amaryllis Picayune, Miss. ^— Soph. 

Dodson, Mrs. Louise M Pascagoula, Miss. Junior 

Domergue, Clarence R., Jr. Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Domergue, Renee Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Donald, Myra Virginia....^— Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Donavan, Mrs. Mabel H Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Donohoe, Gloria Jean .Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Donohoe, Patrick M * Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Dorman, Roy L Union, Miss. Senior 

Dorman, Wilbur E Union, Miss. Soph. 

Dorsett, Joy Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Dossett, Thomas E., Jr , Hattiesburg, Miss. ^— Fresh. 

Doyle, James L Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Drane, Carrie H. Brookhaven, Miss. Junior 

Drane, Mrs. J. E , Wesson, Miss. Fresh. 

Drane, James Earl Wesson, Miss. Special 

Draughn, Susie K Rich ton, Miss. Soph. 

Drummond, Irene ^ Jackson, Miss. Senior 

Drummond, Mrs. T. T Tylertown, Miss. Junior 

Dubuisson, Alphonse B. Bay St. Louis, Miss. Senior 

Dubuisson, James Cuevas, Miss. Senior 

Dubuisson, Kate Long Beach, Miss. Junior 

Dueitt, William E Leakesville, Miss. Soph. 

Duke, Leon G Long Beach, Miss. Soph. 



162 



Register for 1946-47 



Dukes, Buford A Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Dukes, Timon G Polkville, Miss. Fresh. 

Dukes, William F Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Duncan, Mildred Ruth Newton, Miss. Senior 

Dunn, Kathryn Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Dunnam, Annie Picayune, Miss. Senior 

Dunnam, Blanton E j. Leakesville, Miss. ..... Fresh. 

Durr, Juanita Wesson, Miss. Senior 

Early, Jack Quitman, Miss. Fresh. 

Easterling, Bruce Richton, Miss. Soph. 

Easterling, Edith F Moselle, Miss. Senior 

Easterling, Jessie Ray Magee, Miss. Fresh. 

Easterling, Mary Iris ^—Richton, Miss. Soph. 

Easterling, Van B., Jr Lucedale, Miss. Fresh. 

Eaton, Wilmer L Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Eckhoff, Mrs. Eva Grace Lucedale, Miss. Junior 

Edmonds, Elizabeth Meridian, Miss. Post Grad. 

Edmonson, Jack S Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Edwards, Ann Celeste Gulf port, Miss. Senior 

Edwards, Henry G Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Edwards, James K New Orleans, La. Fresh. 

Edwards, Mallie Gilbert Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Edwards, Orlan B Louisville, Miss. Senior 

Elliott, Ralph P. ___ Holly Springs, Miss. Junior 

Ellis, Kathryn Pauline Carthage, Miss. Senior 

Ellis, Mrs. Mildred Y Doddsville, Miss. Soph. 

Ellzey, Mrs. Bertha Columbia, Miss. Senior 

Ellzey, Frank Kokomo, Miss. Junior 

Ellzey, Mildred Bogalusa, La. Senior 

Engbarth, Evelyn Carol Ocean Springs, Miss. ____ Senior 

Eppes, Mrs. Mary Ella Meridian, Miss. Junior 

Ervjn, Annie Ruth— Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Ervin, LaVerne Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Ethridge, Nevie Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Ethridge, Mrs. Ruby A Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Eubanks, Margaret E. Lucedale, Miss. Junior 

Eubanks, Mrs. W.W Hattiesburg, Miss. .... Senior 

Eure, Spurgeon B Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Evans, Bettie Lou * .Jackson, Miss. Soph. 

Evans, Joe T Hattiesbur<?, Miss. Soph. 

Evans, Lester R Hattiesburg Miss. Fresh. 

Evans, Mary Lofton Bogue Chitto, Miss. Senior 

Evans, Mattie Ruth Lake, Miss. Junior 

Evans, Milton Hattiesbur™. Miss. Sooh. 

Evans, Mrs. Murray A... Gulfport. Miss. Junior 

Evans, Thomas Jefferson Hatties^ , Miss. Fresh. 

Evans, Vera Mary Eiloxi. Miss. ... .. Junior 

Everett, Avanell D Tylertov n Miss. Senior 

Everett, Mrs. Clyde N Mageo, Miss. Soph. 

Everett, Clyde R Mage , ?>Tiss. Junior 

Everett, George T Magc\ T' r ^. Soph. 

Everett, Mrs. Harmon Hermnnville Miss. Junior 

Ezell, Mrs. Katie V _>Meadville, Miss. Junior 

Ezzelle, Ancylon C, Jr. Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Ezell, Peggy Jean Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Faggard, Lillian M Wade, Miss. Junior 

Faggard, Norris 0._ Kreole, Miss. Fresh. 



1G3 



Register for 1946-47 



Fairley, Ethel Q 

Fairley, Laura Tew 

Fairly, Mrs. Earl__- 

Falgo, Ernest J 

Fall, Mrs. Vera C 

Falvey, Areola S 

Fancher, Martha Anne- 
Fancher, Mary Alice- 



Biloxi, Miss. Fresh. 

Crandall, Miss. Fresh. 

Mt. Olive, Miss. Junior 

— Pascagoula, Miss. Fresh. 

Laurel, Miss. Senior 

Brookhaven, Miss. Senior 

Coffeeville, Miss. Fresh. 

Coffeeville, Miss. Soph. 

Pascagoula, Miss. Special 

Dorsey, Miss. Fresh. 



Farnsworth, Edith Lloyd 

Farrio, Roy H , 

Fayard, Elam P Saucier, Miss. _ ... Soph. 

Fayard, Sarah J Saucier, Miss. Senior 

Ferguson, Addie McComb, Miss. Post Giad. 

Ferguson, Mrs. Emmie H Batesville, Miss. Senior 

Ferguson, Paul T Batesville, Miss. Junior 

Ferguson, W. C Guntown, Miss. Senior 

Ferrell, Thomas H . Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Fertitta, Frances Helen Hattiesburg, Miss. ___. S oph. 

Fertitta, Mary Katherine Hattiesburg, Miss. ... — - Soph. 

Fibich, Kenneth Q Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Fillingame, Buford Larkin Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Fillingame, Mrs. Ola . Purvis, Miss. Senior 

Finch, Auline Gloster, Miss. Junior 

Finch, John E. J — . Laurel, Miss. Senior 

Findley, Paul C Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Findley, Thomas J., Jr. Vicksburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Finkle, Mrs. Gladys P Gulfport, Miss. Senior 

Finley, Robert Edward Gulfport, Miss. Soph. 

Fitzgerald, Neta B Summit, Miss. _— Junior 

Fleming, Doris Ouida Crandall, Miss. Senior 

Flora, Mrs. Ora L. B Long Beach, Miss. Special 

Floyd, Agness Eugene.—^— Magee, Miss. Soph. 

Flurry, Mrs. R. L. Pascagoula, Miss. Soph. 

Flynn, Charles W Vossburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Flynt, Mrs. Alex Mt. Olive, Miss. Soph. 

Flynt, Ouida Sue Mt. Olive, Miss. Senior 

Flynt, Viola C Mt. Olive, Miss. Junior 

Forbert, David J , Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Forbes, Arthur B. Foxworth, Miss. - Post Grad. 

Forbes, Mrs. Johnie Columbia, Miss. Senior 

Forbes, Mrs. Musette B Sandy Hook, Miss. Post Grad. 

Ford, Harris B Bude, Miss. Soph. 

Ford, Jimmy H Laurel, Miss. Soph. 

Ford, Lawrence Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Ford, Mary Frances ^ Meridian, Miss. Senior 

Ford, Patricia , Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Forde, Amanda B Goodman, Miss. Soph. 



Foreman, Maurice E. 
Foreman, Nettie B. 
Fortenberry, Davis T. 



Fortenberry, Mrs. H. C 

Fortenberry, Jack G. 

Fortenberry, LaVelle...^ 
Fortner, Livingston C- 
Foshee, Orville W. 



-Crosby, Miss. Soph. 

.Crosby, Miss. Junior 

.Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 



Montieello, Miss. Senior 

Sandy Hook, Miss. Junior 

Tula, Miss. Senior 

Gulfport, Miss. Fresh. 

Purvis, Miss. Junior 

Foshee, Mrs. Orville W Seminary, Miss. Soph. 

Foster, Harmon A Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

164 



Register for 1946-47 



Foster, Mrs. Mildred S Biloxi, Miss. Senior 

Foster, William G Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Foy, Mary P Sumrall, Miss. Junior 

Frank, Lillian Bley — - Durant, Miss. Senior 

Franklin, Mrs. Floyd S Harperville, Miss. Senior 

Franklin, Gwendolyn Walnut Grove, Miss. Fresh. 

Frasco, Naida Marie New York, N. Y. Senior 

Frazier, Mrs. Vivian Ezell Pascagoula, Miss. Soph. 

Freeman, Betty Carolyn Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Freeman, Claude H., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Freeman, Richard W Hattiesburg, Miss. .._>. Soph. 

Freeman, Robert W Hattiesburg, Miss. _„ Soph. 

Freeman, Ruth Joyce Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

French, Mrs. Jean Tidwell Pass Christian, Miss. Special 

French, Lee S " Selma, Ala. — Fresh. 

French, Marjory Elaine Pass Christian, Miss. Senior 

Frentz, Alma D Biloxi, Miss. Soph. 

Fries, George M Purvis, Miss. Soph. 

Fuller, James Leon . Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Fuller, Mrs. James Leon Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Fuller, Mrs. Marie W Gautier, Miss. Special 

Fullilove, Emily B Winona, Miss. Senior 

Furr, Lela Mae ^ Hermanville, Miss. Senior 

Furr, Mrs. L. R. Pascagoula, Miss. Special 

Galbraith, Betty Jean Gulf port, Miss. Fresh. 

Gamble, Janie H Purvis, Miss. __* Soph. 

Gandy, Benjamin E Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Gandy, Bertha .- Hattiesburg, Miss. , Senior 

Gandy, Carolyn Elizabeth — Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Gandy, Mildred Louise Hazlehurst, Miss. Soph. 

Gardner, Rachel Pascagoula, Miss. Special 

Gardner, Rubye Lee Louin, Miss. Special 

Garner, James Odis Raleigh, Miss. Fresh. 

Garner, Walton T Hattiesburg, Miss. Post Grad. 

Garraway, Hugh P New Augusta, Miss. Soph. 

Gerald, Mrs. W. E . McComb, Miss. Fresh. 

Gibson, Anita S Mize, Miss. Senior 

Gibson, B. W. Pontotoc, Miss. Senior 

Gibson, Mrs. B. W Pontotoc, Miss. Post Grad. 

Gibson, Jimmie David Mize, Miss. Soph. 

Gibson, John W., Jr. Hub, Miss. Soph. 

Gibson, Mrs. J. W ..—-Hub, Miss. Post Grad. 

Gibson, Olive Rae Collins, Miss. Soph. 

Gifford, Gertrude J. Long Beach, Miss. Fresh. 

Gilbert, Frankie Lee Lena, Miss. 1 Senior 

Gilbert, Jacqueline Forest, Miss. Junior 

Giles, Alice* Robinson Chunky, Miss. Senior 

Giles, Mary M Meridian, Miss. Soph. 

Giles, Thomas F Waynesboro, Miss. Senior- 
Gill, Donald A Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Gill, Mrs. Donna C Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Gill, Gloria Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Gill, Ruth Johns, Miss. Junior 

Gillespie, Hilton L Sumrall, Miss. Fresh. 

Gillespie, Mrs. H. L Sumrall, Miss. Junior 

Gillis, Bernice Hattiesburg, Miss. — - Senior 

Gillis, Delia Brooklyn, Miss. Senior 



165 



Register for 1946-47 



Ginn, Ann Morrow Tylertown, Miss. Soph. 

Ginsberg, Cecile Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Gipson, Mrs. T. J Silver Creek, Miss. Senior 

Given, Bobbie Koch Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Given, Charles D..__. Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Givens, Richard E Gulf port, Miss. Special 

Glenn, R. N Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Glenn, Zula Sarepta, Miss. Senior 

Godard, John R Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Godbold, Mary Elizabeth McCall Creek, Miss. — Senior 

Goff, Mrs. E. L .-Moss Point, Miss. Senior 

Gordon, Ada W Bucatunna, Miss. Senior 

Gordon, Robert W Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Gore, Carver Marks, Miss. Junior 

Goree, Peggy Jean Quitman, Miss." Soph. 

Gough, Chester, Jr Lucedale, Miss. Fresh. 

Grady, Paul E._.__ Seminary, Miss. Fresh. 

Graham, Albert K Sumrall, Miss. Soph. 

Graham, Mrs. Albert Moss Point, Miss. Special 

Graham, Barbara Jane Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Graham, Charles V Moss, Miss. Junior 

Graham, Mrs. Desmond, Jr. Gulf port, Miss. Senior 

Graham, Mrs. Forbin Claude Wesson, Miss. — Junior 

Graham, Gwendolyn D Seminary, Miss. Fresh. 

Graham, James K Kaufman, Texas Senior 

Graham, Lance L Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Graham, Mary Florence ^ Waynesboro, Miss. Post Grad. 

Graham, Patricia Ann Collins, Miss. Junior 

Graham, Roy McCoy Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Graham, Victoria P Sumrall, Miss. Soph. 

Grammer, Leone Memphis, Tenn. Post Grad. 

Granberry, Annie P. Brookhaven, Miss. Special 

Granberry, Billie Ruth Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Granberry, Mary Deane Richton, Miss. Junior 

Grantham, Albert G. _►__ Collins, Miss. ... ^ Fresh. 

Grantham, Clyde L McLaurin, Miss. Fresh. 

Grantham, Daniel H Purvis, Miss. Senior 

Grantham, Dorothy Frances Stringer, Miss. Senior 

Gray, Carrie Jean Waynesboro, Miss. Soph. 

Gray, Mary Benton Waynesboro, Miss. Junior 

Gray, Mrs. S. T New Augusta, Miss. Post Grad. 

Grayson, Mittie May _.— ..Biloxi, Miss. Special 

Green, Fairra Belle Louin, Miss. Soph. 

Green, Gerald D Foxworth, Miss. Fresh. 

Green, Mary G Wesson, Miss. _, Junior 

Green, Ortus L Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Green, Roy C Rienzi, Miss. Junior 

Greene, Anna Mabel j. Decatur, Miss. Junior 

Greenwood, Billye Jo Carthage, Miss. Fresh. 

Greenwood, Joseph Earl Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Greenwood, William D Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Greer, Mrs. G. M Ruth, Miss. ... Soph. 

Greer, Mrs. J. Howard Bogue Chitto, Miss. Senior 

Greer, Mrs. Jodie K Bogue Chitto, Miss. Senior 

Grice, Lizzie Lovell Bogue Chitto, Miss. Senior 

Grice, Philip G Crystal Springs, Miss. Senior 

Grice, Rembert Ray Columbia, Miss. Senior 



166 



Register for 1946-47 



Griffin, Mrs. Dorothy M Pascagoula, Miss. Soph. 

Griffin, Lucille Ella Quentin, Miss. Soph. 

Griffin, Minor Leonard Leakesville, Miss. Soph. 

Griffin, Ralph D., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Griffin, Robert A Pascagoula, Miss. Fresh. 

Griffin, Thomas W Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Griffin, William K.__*_- Magnolia, Miss. Fresh. 

Griff is, Mrs. Winnie Iva Beaumont, Miss. Soph. 

Griffith, Frances Kathlene Prentiss, Miss. Soph. 

Griffith, Linda Forbes Columbia, Miss. Senior 

Griffith, Virginia W Prentiss, Miss. Senior 

Grimes, Harlene Carthage, Miss. — Senior 

Grimes, Mark C Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Grissom, Mable E Dorsey, Miss. Senior 

Grubbs, Nell Magee, Miss. Junior 

Guess, James M Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Guess, Jerome R Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Guess, Richard C Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Guice, Mrs. Charles E McComb, Miss. Junior 

Guidry, Frances W Biloxi, Miss. Fresh. 

Guin, Ted ...- Winf ield, Ala. Fresh. 

Gunnell, Mrs. Allie Mae Union Church, Miss. Senior 

Gunter, Ada Lucedale, Miss. Soph. 

Guy, D. L., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. ^... . ...Soph. 

Haas, Eunice J Bay St. Louis, Miss Junior 

Haddon, Martin E. Leakesville, Miss. Special 

Haddon, Mrs. Mary Leakesville, Miss. Soph. 

Hadskey, Elizabeth Roxie, Miss. Junior 

Hagan, James R DeKalb, Miss. Soph. 

Haigler, Felda L Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Hailes, Henry G Shubuta, Miss. Fresh. 

Hailes, Sylvia Hattiesburg, Miss. .—Fresh. 

Hale, Georgia Nelle Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Hall, Dorothy S Wiggins, Miss. Post Grad. 

Hall, Mrs. Iris S — ...Mt. Olive, Miss. Senior 

Hall, James Roberts , Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Hall, James Terry Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Hall, Lessie M Collins, Miss. Junior 

Hall, Louis Denby Petal, Miss. Soph. 

Hall, Mrs. Marguerite S Picayune, Miss. Junior 

Halliwell, David Harry, Jr Petal, Miss. — Soph. 

Halvorsen, Elaine Leakesville, Miss. Senior 

Halvorsen, Frederick H.__*-_ Leakesville, Miss. Senior 

Hamilton, Martha Elizabeth Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Hamilton, Mary G Hurley, Miss. Soph. 

Hamilton, Wanda A. Thomastown, Miss. Senior 

Hammack, Mrs. Marie Meridian, Miss. Post Grad. 

Hammett, Emry H Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Hammett, Luther C New Augusta, Miss. Junior 

Hammond, Charles L Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Hammond, Frank J., Jr Kreole, Miss. Fresh. 

Hammond, Sam C Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Hamn, Ruth Leakesville, Miss. Fresh. 

Hand, Edith Jackson, Miss. Junior 

Hanner, Austin Z Poplarville, Miss. Junior 

Hansbrough, Robert H Greenville, Miss. Fresh. 

Hanson, Mary Catherine Pass Christian, Miss. Senior 



167 



Register for 1946-47 



Harbour, Lola M - Union, Miss. Junior 

Harbour, Nannie Mae Union, Miss. Senior 

Hardin, Bobbye R Taylorsville, Miss. Soph. 

Hardin, Daulton W Taylorsville, Miss. Fresh. 

Hardin, Lee B Mize, Miss. ____. Fresh. 

Hardy, Ima Jewel Union, Miss. Junior 

Harkey, Beryl Dean Biloxi, Miss. Soph. 

Harman, Sarah Carroll * Hattiesburg, Miss. Post. Grad. 

Harmon, Mrs. Erma Lee Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Harmon, Norwood Russell Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Harper, Joseph L., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Harper, Miles D., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Harrell, Helen Carthage, Miss. Junior 

Harrill, Edward G Picayune, Miss. Junior 

Harrington, Mary F Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Harris, Mrs. C. F Pascagoula, Miss. Special 

Harris, Mrs. Estelle W Monticello, Miss. ....-— Senior 

Harris, John C Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Harris, Sidney N - Hattiesburg, Miss. Special 

Harrison, Alton Forest, Miss. Junior 

Harrison, Charles M Forest, Miss. Senior 

Harrod, Clellan Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Harrod, Richard 0..- Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Hart, Earline L Bond, Miss. Junior 

Hart, Eola S „ — Bogue Chitto, Miss Soph. 

Hart, Ira, L., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Hartfield, Robert E., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Hartley, Eula Lee Lucedale, Miss. Senior 

Harvey, Emmett Mt. Olive, Miss. Senior 

Harvey, Ruby Olive - Lucedale, Miss. Special 

Harvey, W. C : Collins, Miss. Junior 

Harvison, Cecil T Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Hassell, Jessica D Gloster, Miss. * Senior 

Hatcher, Lester C Meridian, Miss. Senior 

Hatcher, Tommye Jean Louisville, Miss. Junior 

Hathorn, Wyndal *_ Carson, Miss. Junior 

Hathorne, Claude Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Hatten, Dorris M Wiggins, Miss. Senior 

Hatten, Mrs. Ella W Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Havens, Mrs. C. D Perkinston, Miss. Soph. 

Hawkins, Donald G Forest, Miss. Fresh. 

Hawkins, Lawrence Lee Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Hawley, Obie E..— . Moss Point, Miss. . Fresh. 

Hay, Connie N Blytheville, Ark. Junior 

Hayes, Robert Earl Shubuta, Miss. Fresh. 

Hays, Mrs. Katie M Hermanville, Miss. Junior 

Hays, Virgie Liberty, Miss. Senior 

Hegwood, Berneda D Hattiesburg, Miss. Post Grad. 

Hegwood, Wayne H .^— ..Jackson, Miss. ..Soph. 

Hegwood, William E Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Helton, Walter T Petal, Miss. Soph. 

Hemba, Blanche M Lumberton, Miss. Fresh. 

Henry, Hollis G Saucier, Miss, Fresh. 

Hensarling, Mrs. M.B Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Herrin, Mary Jane Sumrall, Miss. Junior 

Herring, Charles W Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Herring, Mrs. Fred McCall, Creek, Miss. Special 



168 



Register for 1946-47 



Herring, J. D Sandy Hook, Miss. Junior 

Heiring, Mrs. J. D Sandy Hook, Miss. Junior 

Herring, Rebekah Jane Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Herring, Mrs. Vannie Lee Sanford, Miss. Junior 

Herrington, Ida Belle Terry, Miss. Special 

Herrington, John W Collins, Miss. Soph. 

Herrington, Robert R., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Herrington, Vaden M Oxford, Penn. -Senior 

Hesson, Robert W Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Hester, Grace T Mize, Miss. Junior 

Hester, Mrs. Rosa B.: Gulfport, Miss. Fresh. 

Hewes, Lorita Ruth Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Hickman, Betty Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Hickman, Bobbie N — - „... Richton, Miss. Junior 

Hickman, Dora Richton, Miss. Junior 

Hickman, Harry V., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Hickman, Yvonne Philadelphia, Miss. Senior 

Hicks, Alfred B Calhoun City, Miss. Fresh. 

Hicks, James M Leakesville, Miss. Senior 

Hicks, Roy Gene Leakesville, Miss. Soph. 

Higgason, Doris W Waynesboro, Miss. Fresh. 

Hill, Dalton D'Lo, Miss. Soph. 

Hill, Edward L Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Hill, Ferrell G D'Lo, Miss. Fresh. 

Hill, Ina A _, Soso, Miss. Junior 

Hill, Joseph B Booneville, Miss. Soph. 

Hill, Louise Macon, Miss. _„..— Senior 

Hill, Mary _*__ Booneville, Miss. Senior 

Hill, Mellie Beatrice Seminary, Miss. Senior 

Hill, William H Sumrall, Miss. Fresh. 

Hillman, Mrs. J. L McLain, Miss. Senior 

Hilman, Lora Jean McLain, Miss. Junior 

Hillman, Virginia Leakesville, Miss. Junior 

Hillman, Willie B Neely, Miss. Junior 

Hinson, Hervy Lucedale, Miss. Fresh. 

Hinton, Alice Bethea Ellisville, Miss. Senior 

Hinton, Joseph Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Hinton, Mrs. Mamie P Pascagoula, Miss. Special 

Hinton, Merito W Beaumont, Miss. Junior 

Hirschenhofer, Carl D Vicksburg, Miss. Soph. 

Hitchcock, Wade, Jr .— . Smiths Grove, Ky. Soph. 

Hitt, Dan G Slate Springs, Miss. Fresh. 

Hoadley, Norma Jean Columbus, Ohio Fresh. 

Hobbs, Iris Campbell Bay St. Louis, Miss. Senior 

Hobson, Robert A Chester, Pa. Fresh. 

Hocutt, Troy P Hattiesburg, Miss. ..—Fresh. 

Hodges, Jessie McComb, Miss. Fresh. 

Hodges, John W Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Hoffman, George W Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Hoffpauir, Adam E Hattiesburg, Miss. Post Grad. 

Holaday, Howard R Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Holcomb, Minnie D Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Holcomb, Nina Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Holdeman, Julia Mae Gulfport, Miss. Fresh. 

Holder, Harper C McLaurin, Miss. Fresh. 

Holder, Herbert McLaurin, Miss. Fresh. 

Holifield, Dorthy Mae Soso, Miss. .... -—Fresh. 



169 



Register for 1946-47 



Holland, Ollie Mae Richton, Miss. Fresh. 

Holliday, Charla Dann Poplarville, Miss. Soph. 

Holliday, Mary E Poplarville, Miss. Junior 

Hollingsworth, Fannie Mae Newton, Miss. Senior 

Hollingsworth, Kyle V Philadelphia, Miss. Senior 

Hollingsworth, Walter R .*. Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Holloway, Harrell E Carson, Miss. Senior 

Holmer, Annie D McComb, Miss. Special 

Holmes, D. W., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. __*._ Fresh. 

Holmes, John W Bogalusa, La. Fresh. 

Holston, Sara L. Lumberton, Miss. Senior 

Honaker, Douglas F. Bogalusa, La. Soph. 

Honea, Elsie W.— Magnolia, Miss. Junior 

Honess, Edwin L Cleveland, Ohio Fresh. 

Hood, Ada Elizabeth Lodi, Miss. Junior 

Hord, Mrs. Valera H Carmichael, Miss. Fresh. 

Horn, Ann Elizabeth Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Horn, Mary Alice Bay Springs, Miss. Senior 

Horn, Willie Grace Magee, Miss. Soph. 

Home, Alberta * Lucedale, Miss. Junior 

Home, Hazel C Noxapater, Miss. Senior 

Horton, Nancy Lillian New Orleans, La. Senior 

Horton, Ruth Kay Mt. Olive, Miss. Junior 

Horwitz, Dave Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Hosey, Richard Benjamin Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Howard, Carl L Starkville, Miss. Fresh. 

Howard, Sabel _-- Bessemer, Ala. Soph, 

Howard, Manita Louise Purvis, Miss. Junior 

Howard, Mary Edwina Pascagoula, Miss. Soph. 

Howard, Susan P Gulfport, Miss. Post Grad. 

Howard, Walter E Moss Point, Miss. Soph. 

Howell, Mrs. C. E Jayess, Miss. Junior 

Howell, Hershel A Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Howell, Leroy H Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Howze, Mrs. Aurora Leigh Logtown, Miss. Soph. 

Hubbert, Hewitt E DeSoto, Miss. Soph. 

Hudson, Mrs. Inzer Purvis, Miss. Soph. 

Hudson, Mogree Union, Miss. Senior 

Hudson, Wilson Purvis, Miss. ..-— Fresh. 

Huff, Fredna Raleigh, Miss. Soph. 

Hughes, Rita Mae Bude, Miss. Junior 

Huguley, Dixie Louise Ruth, Miss. Junior 

Hunt, Martha Janice Louisville, Miss. Junior 

Hunter, lone Webb . West Enterprise, Miss. Senior 

Hurlbert, Joe H Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Hurst, Johnnie Lou Biloxi, Miss. Fresh. 

Hurst, Joseph L Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Hutto, Andrew C, Jr + Gulfport, Miss. u_ Senior 

Hutto, Mrs. Sallie S Meadville, Miss. Senior 

Hyatt, Ishmael H Raymond, Miss. Junior 

Hyatt, Katherine S Raymond, Miss. Junior 

Hyche, Mrs. Katie W Laurel, Miss. Junior 

Hyde, Charles C Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Ikerd, William G ^—Philadelphia, Miss. Special 

Imbragulio, Francis -Ellisville, Miss. Junior 

Ingram, Kittie Winona, Miss. Soph. 

Ingram, Mrs. S. J Bay St. Louis, Miss. Fresh. 



170 



Register for 1946-47 



Irby, Ella Mae Meridian, Miss. Junior 

Isenberg, Fred ^— Hattiesburg, Miss. J — . Soph. 

Ishee, George G Laurel, Miss. Fresh. 

Ishee, Hannah Stringer, Miss. Senior 

Jacks, Pearl Pascagoula, Miss. Jun ior 

Jackson, Mrs. Ellen M Hattiesburg, Miss. Post Grad. 

Jackson, Lacey Jane Tylertown, Miss. Junior 

Jackson, Wayne E * Purvis, Miss. Fresh. 

James, Charles C Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

James, James G., Jr Montrose, Miss. Fresh. 

James, Martha Elizabeth Montrose, Miss. Senior 

Jarrell, Charles Keith Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Jarrell, Mrs. Hazel Stewart Picayune, Miss. Junior 

Jarrell, Jack McLain, Miss. Fresh. 

Jarrell, Mrs. Theresa S Picayune, Miss. Special 

Jay, Leota ^ Meridian, Miss. Soph. 

Jenkins, Bertram K Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Jenkins, Elaine -Union, Miss. Junior 

Jennings, Leslie Richton, Miss. Fresh. 

Jernigan, Robert F Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Johansson, Gustaf L Moss Point, Miss. ...Junior 

Johansson, Viola H Grand Bay, Ala. Special 

Johns, Robert L Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Johnson, Ada Maye Purvis, Miss. Senior 

Johnson, Albert S Meridian, Miss. Fresh. 

Johnson, Alvis, C Meridian, Miss. Senior 

Johnson, Annie June Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Johnson, Aubrey H Jackson, Miss. Junior 

Johnson, A. J., Jr * Purvis, Miss. Fresh. 

Johnson, Mrs. A. J Purvis, Miss. Fresh. 

Johnson, Burtis K Laurel, Miss. Senior 

Johnson, Celia Lodi, Miss. Junior 

Johnson, Hilda Jo Harperville, Miss. .— Junior 

Johnson, Gatha Andrew Magee, Miss. Senior 

Johnson, Gladys Imelda Pascagoula, Miss. Junior 

Johnson, J. Ernest Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Johnson, Kathryn Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Johnson, Mrs. L. A Jay ess, Miss. Junior 

Johnson, Mary A. Ross Gulfport, Miss. Junior 

Johnson, Mattie Sue Lena, Miss. Soph. 

Johnson, Mildred M. Center, Miss. Junior 

Johnson, Olion S Purvis, Miss. — Senior 

Johnson, Ollie H., Jr ^ Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Johnson, 0. S Purvis, Miss. Senior 

Johnson, Robert L Long Beach, Miss. Junior 

Johnson, Rufus H Purvis, Miss. Junior 

Johnson, Velma Sue Tylertown, Miss. Senior 

Johnson, Wilma D Magee, Miss. Junior 

Johnston, Hilda Rae Purvis, Miss. Junior 

Johnston, Mrs. J. T *_ Newhebron, Miss. ..Fresh. 

Johnston, Ruth Purvis, Miss. Senior 

Johnston, Vilma Mae Purvis, Miss. Junior 

Joiner, Connie Mae Kosciusko, Miss. Junior 

Jones, A. Louise Puckett, Miss. Senior 

Jones, Bettie Virginia Brandon, Miss. Senior 

Jones, Bobbie H Richton, Miss. Soph. 

Jones, Charlene L Pachuta, Miss. Senior 



171 



Register for 1946-47 



Jones, Condit P. Columbia, Miss. Junior 

Jones, Eddis Mae Mize, Miss. Soph. 

Jones, Mrs. Emmie Moody Laurel, Miss. Senior 

Jones, Mrs. Fairlye C Meadville, Miss. Soph. 

Jones, Fred L _>__ Morton, Miss. Junior 

Jones, George W Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Jones, Grace Elizabeth Logtown, Miss. Soph. 

Jones, James R Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Jones, John P Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Jones, Lavonne E. Lake, Miss. Junior 

Jones, Martha Lou -_ Collins, Miss. ...^ Fresh. 

Jones, Mrs. Mary Boone Polkville, Miss. Senior 

Jones, Paul W Pocahontas, Miss. Junior 

Jones, Richard M Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Jones, Roy E Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Jones, Vernon D Bogalusa, La. Fresh. 

Jones, Walter H Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Jordan, Cecil R Ellis ville, Miss. Senior 

Jordan, Dorothy Jean Sunflower, Miss. Fiesh. 

Joidan, Elizabeth S Columbus, Miss. Soph. 

Jordan, Mrs. Emily K Mobile, Ala. ^_ .Junior 

Jordan, Helen Grace Sanford, Miss. Soph. 

Jordan, J. M State Line, Miss. Fresh. 

Jordan, Mrs. Jessie Collins, Miss. Junior 

Jordan, Kendall T Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Jordan, Mabel Kinard Hattiesburg, Miss. Post Grad. 

Jordan, Maurine Gulfport, Miss. Post Grad. 

Jordan, Oliver B. - Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Jordan, Robert M Carthage, Miss. Fresh. 

Jordan, Sonya Rebecca Columbia, Miss. __►. Junior 

Jordan, Willie W Sanford, Miss. Senior 

Judge, James Ray Hickory, Miss. Soph. 

Katrishen, Alex Hazleton, Pa. _:. Senior 

Katrishen, William Hazleton, Pa. Senior 

Keel, Betty e Joyce _*_ DeLisle, Miss. Soph. 

Keen, Zula Bogue Chitto, Miss. Soph. 

Kell, Betty H _l_Pascagoula, Miss. Fresh. 

Kellar, Olivia ..Picayune, Miss. Fresh. 

Kelly, Ernest M Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Kelly, Augustus F., Jr Seminary, Miss. Fresh. 

Kelly, George P _»__ Biloxi, Miss. Fresh. 

Kelly, Gillette F Seminary, Miss. Senior 

Kelly, Irvin L., Jr Pascagoula, Miss. . Fresh. 

Kelly, James Ellis Seminary, Miss. Soph. 

Kelly, Yuvette Raleigh, Miss. Senior 

Kemp, Mary Ruby Louisville, Miss. Junior 

Kemp, Wilda Pearl Foxworth, Miss. — Senior 

Kendall, Joyce M. . Lumberton, Miss. Junior 

Kendrick, Mrs. Theo F Gulfport, Miss. Junior 

Kennedy, Alma Louise Magee, Miss. Soph. 

Kennedy, Burna Dean , Magee, Miss. Soph. 

Kennedy, Bobbie Ruth Philadelphia, Miss. Junior 

Kennedy, Mrs. Elizabeth M. Port Gibson, Miss. Junior 

Kennedy, G. W Mendenhall, Miss. Fresh. 

Kennedy, Jerelyn Rosamond Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Kennedy, Joan Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Kennedy, Mrs. Margaret F Wesson, Miss. Junior 



172 



Register for 1946-47 



Kepper, Carl W McComb, Miss. Fresh. 

Kernaghan, Edward Hattiesburg, Miss. ...Fresh. 

Kessler, Dorothy D Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Ketler, William Roy Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Key, Donald R Morton, Miss. Fresh. 

Keys, Charles H Collins, Miss. Senior 

Keys, Sarah D Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Killen, Ada Lou Union, Miss. Post Grad. 

Killingsworth, Gwendolyn Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

King, Edith B Mt. Olive, Miss. Junior 

King, Eula Mae Mt. Olive, Miss. Post Grad. 

King, Mary E Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

King, Milly Jean B Gulfport, Miss. Senior 

King, Mrs. Pearl Reeves Hattiesburg, Miss. Post Grad. 

King, Robert Ellis — - Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

King, Sam S Mt. Olive, Miss. Fresh. 

King, William Harmon Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Kingsbery, Robert W Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Kirkland, George A Quitman, Miss. Fresh. 

Kirkland, Knox Quitman, Miss Soph. 

Kirkpatrick, Audrey H. Hattiesburg, Miss. Special 

Kirkpatrick, Dotty Erie .—....Hattiesburg, Miss. Special 

Kirkpatrick, Ira Lee N'oxapater, Miss. .... _—___. Senior 

Kirkwood, Mrs. Nel W. Hattiesburg, Miss. Special 

Kite, John A., Jr Gulfport, Miss. Junior 

Kizer, Gladys Eugenia .New Site, Miss. Senior 

Klein, Etta Mae Long Beach, Miss. Soph. 

Knapp, Loren E. Kreole, Miss. Fresh. 

Knight, Buddy Joe Taylorsville, Miss. Fresh. 

Knight, Cecil B — „Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Knight, Tellie O Moselle, Miss. Post Grad. 

Knight, Victor H Lucedale, Miss Fresh. 

Koch, Bobbie Katherine Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Kolb, John A Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Koonce, Derrell F Sulphur, La. Fresh. 

Koonce, Eileen , Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Kovacevich, Paul F Biloxi, Miss. Soph. 

Krohn, L. A Wiggins, Miss. Senior 

Krohn, Letha ..Wiggins, Miss. Soph. 

Krohn, Lorenzo A. Biloxi, Miss. Fresh. 

Kyker, Fannie L Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Kyzar, Charles G ..— ■ Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Lack, Jerry B Mt: Olive, Miss. Fresh. 

Lacoste, Laurin G. Bay St. Louis, Miss. Special 

Ladner, Adolph Poplarville, Miss. Soph. 

Ladner, Betty Anne Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Ladner, Delmas L., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Ladner, Ida Mae Pass Christian, Miss. Senior 

Ladner, Mrs. Jewel Picayune, Miss. Junior 

Ladner, Lonis C Biloxi, Miss. Junior 

Ladner, Lora Saucier, Miss. Junior 

Ladner, Tecia Mary Biloxi, Miss. Junior 

Ladner, Von Steuben John Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Ladnier, Royal M Gulfport, Miss. Senior 

Laird, Henry M , _Carson, Miss. Senior 

Lambright, Maxie T. Houston, Tex. Junior 

Lambuth, Robert W., Jr Meadville, Miss. Soph. 



173 



Register for 1946-47 



Lancaster, Hugh Forest, Miss. Junior 

Landers, Emma Rachel Baxterville, Miss. Soph. 

Landrum, Robbie Ruth Lumberton, Miss. Junior 

Landrum, Evan D . Picayune, Miss. Soph. 

Landrum, Hollis T Brookhaven, Miss. Fresh. 

Landrum, Zella R. Seminary, Miss. Senior 

Landry, Donald H Waveland, Miss. Fresh. 

Lane, Alfred D Collins, Miss. ^— ..Junior 

Lane, Charles Evans Jayess, Miss. Junior 

Lane, Mrs. E. N Newhebron, Miss. Special 

Lane, E. Noel Newhebron, Miss. Special 

Lane, Mrs. Virgie M ^— .Collins, Miss. Soph. 

Laney, Audrey P Quincy, Miss. Junior 

Laney, Lee R Quincy, Miss. Senior 

Lang, Bobbie Mary Magee, Miss. Junior 

Langdon, Betty Sue Magnolia, Miss. ..... Fresh. 

Langley, Frank .-„ Sumrall, Miss. Fresh. 

Langston, Mrs. Kate-—-.- Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Larkin, Mrs. Ruby Brewer. Brookhaven, Miss. Senior 

Larrimore, David Tylertown, Miss. Senior 

Latham, Evelyn E Lucedale, Miss. Fresh. 

Latham, Joseph H Lawley, Ala. Junior 

Latimer, Joan Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Lawson, Warren Ray Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Ledet, Frances M +— ..Newhebron, Miss. _. : Soph. 

Lee, Dan M Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Lee, Edward Brooklyn, Miss. Fresh. 

Lee, Iva Loye Brooklyn, Miss. Fresh. 

Lee, James B Saucier, Miss. Senior 

Lee, J. L Sumrall, Miss. Senior 

Lee, Katie Ruth Shivers, Miss. Junior 

Lee, Mrs. Lizzie M Picayune, Miss. Fresh. 

Lee, Lura E Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Lee, Luther E Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Lee, Marvin K Ellisville, Miss. Junior 

Lee, Nan L <. Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Lee, Orpha Poplarville, Miss. Junior 

Lee, Theresa j. Saucier, Miss. Junior 

Lee, Thomas Gene Shivers, Miss. Soph. 

Lee, Walter M., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Lee, William T Collins, Miss. Fresh. 

Legg, M. Lucille Petal, Miss. Fresh. 

Leggett, Alene H Mt. Olive, Miss. Soph. 

Leggett, Mrs. Alton - McComb, Miss. Junior 

Leggett, Mrs. Leroy Bogue Chitto, Miss. Fresh. 

LeGros, John T Mobile, Ala. Soph. 

Lentz, James C Foxworth, Miss. Special 

Lesley, Lorena Frances New Albany, Miss. Senior 

Lewis, Albaugh Lee Robertsdale, Ala Soph. 

Lewis, Betty Sue .Sanatorium, Miss. Fresh. 

Lewis, John B _►. Collins, Miss __Fresh. 

Lewis, L. C Laurel, Miss. Junior 

Lewis, Mrs. L. E Hattiesburg, Miss. Special 

Lewis, Patsy .Hazlehurst, Miss. .—Post Grad. 

Lewis, Ruby Mae Brookhaven, Miss. Junior 

Lewis, Tully Gene ^— Pachuta, Miss. Fresh. 

Lightsey, Beverly A. Pachuta, Miss. Soph. 



174 



Register for 1946-47 



Lightsey, Charleene Pachuta, Miss. Senior 

Lightsey, Willie B Bay Springs, Miss. Fresh. 

Limbaugh, Ernest Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Lindsey, Gladys F Gulf port, Miss. Special 

Linton, Helen C Holmesville, Miss. Junior 

Lipe, May Jean — Vance, Miss. Special 

Lipscomb, Richard H Fort Worth, Tex. Fresh. 

Lipscomb, William P., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Lipsey, John E McComb, Miss. Soph. 

Lisovicz, Leonard P Newark, N. J. Soph. 

Little, Carl L Carriere, Miss. Soph. 

Little, Mrs. Grace C Monticello, Miss. __* Special 

Little, John W . Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Little, Martin L Mt. Olive, Miss. Fresh. 

Little, Violet H Carpenter, Miss. — — . Junior 

Lizana, Mrs. E. J Carriere, Miss. Junior 

Locke, Stewart Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Lofton, Mrs. Alma W .Gulfport, Miss. Junior 

Loftus, Francis S — - Gloster, Miss. Junior 

Logan, Alvin L Meridian, Miss. Fresh. 

Logan, Lucian L. Pascagoula, Miss. Fresh. 

Logan, Needham D Edinburg, Miss. Junior 

Long, Arthur Ray Sardis, Miss. Fresh. 

Long, Leonard L. , Louin, Miss. Senior 



Long, Norma Jean 

Longmire, Carolyn, Rose. 

Longre, Robin 

Loper, Mrs. Barbara D._ 
Loper, Erma J. Purcell. 

Loper, Jeffie D 

Loper, Ouida Smith 

Loper, Roland H 

Lord, Mrs. Frances H.„. 

Lott, Mrs. Clyde 

Lott, Denson W. 

Lott, Ernest 

Lott, Eva Mae 

Lott, Janell 

Lott, Mrs. Lola Mae 

Lott, Meda Elizabeth. 

Lott, Nita M 

Lovett, Mrs. Elaine C 

Lovorn, Hortense 

Lovorn, Mildred. 



Meridian, Miss. Junior 

Natchez, Miss. Fresh. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Special 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Pickens, Miss. Junior 

Decatur, Miss. Senior 

Gautier, Miss. Special 

Vosburg, Miss. Senior 

Kosciusko, Miss. Senior 

Sumrall, Miss. Fresh. 

Collins, Miss. Fresh. 

Seminary, Miss. Fresh. 

Seminary, Miss. Soph. 

Seminary, Miss. Soph. 

Sumrall, Miss. Junior 

Wiggins, Miss. Senior 

Bude, Miss. Junior 

Meadville, Miss. ..—....Junior 

.Thomastown, Miss. Junior 

.Louisville, Miss. Junior 



Lowe, Raymond G Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Lowery, Frances Helen Seminary, Miss. Soph. 

Lowery, Hilda B Wesson, Miss. Junior 

Lowrey, Jean Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Lowrie, Gloria lone , Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Lucas, Mildred L Laurel, Miss. Junior 

Lucas, William H Laurel, Miss. Fresh. 

Luke, Gloria Shuqualak, Miss. Senior 

Lumpkin, Nell B Lucedale, Miss. Post Grad. 

Lundy, Therell B Philadelphia, Miss. Soph. 

Lundy, Thomas J., Jr....^ Greenville, Miss. ... ^ Fresh. 

Lyle, J. Matthew Lena, Miss. Post Grad. 

Lynch, Ethyl Alyne Aberdeen, Miss. Senior 



175 



Register for 1946-47 



Lynd, Mrs. Louise B Moss Point, Miss. Senior 

McAfee, Annie Pearl Amory, Miss. Senior 

McCabe, Lillian J Gulfport, Miss. Senior 

McCaffrey, James L., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

McCaleb, Pearl Taylor Carlisle, Miss. Junior 

McCarthy, George W - Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

McCarthy, Richard P Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

McCarthy, Robert Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

McCarty, Travis Earl Polkville, Miss. ... . Fresh. 

McCary, Daisy Elma Egypt, Miss. Post Grad. 

McCaskey, Doris Bucatunna, Miss. Junior 

McCharen, Hazel Jackson, Miss. Soph. 

McClamrock, David,... Pascagoula, Miss. Soph. 

McClamrock, Waldo C Pascagoula, Miss. Soph. 

McClellan, Bennie Sue Quitman, Miss. Fresh. 

McClelland, Jane Ellen Gulfport, Miss. Senior 

McCormick, Boots Leroy Meridian, Miss. Junior 

McCormick, Helen Louise .Foxworth, Miss. Junior 

McCoy, Mrs Dorothy F Terry, Miss. Senior 

McCraney, William Hugh Newton, Miss. Junior 

McCrary, James A Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

McCullough, Mrs. Alma M Pricedale, Miss. Junior 

McCurley, Nellie Wren Crosby, Miss. Senior 

McCurley, William C. -— Crosby, Miss. Junior 

McDaniel, Fred H., Jr Columbia, Miss. Senior 

McDaniel, Vera Ella Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

McDaniels, Jesse L Osyka, Miss. Senior 

McDonald, Edith W Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

McDonald, Irean Lena, Miss. Soph. 

McDonald, Mrs. Katie M Columbia, Miss. Senior 

McDonald, Lois Aline Meridian, Miss. Post Grad. 

McDonald, Luther Lamar Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

McDuffie, Neil 0., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

McElveen, Mrs. Julia B Tylertown, Miss. Senior 

McFarland, Carl G Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

McGee, Carolyn Biloxi, Miss. Junior 

McGehee, Mrs. Mattie J ..Gulfport, Miss. Special 

McGilvray, Wirt T Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

McGough, Olivia Nell Morton, Miss. Senior 

McGowan, Emma C Camden, Miss. Junior 

McGowan, John A Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

McGowen, Peter Jerome Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

McGraw, Winthrop Mize, Miss. Senior 

MacGregor, Charles G Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

McGuffee, Vescie P _- Bogue Chitto, Miss. Special 

McHann, Julia Mae Starkville, Miss. Soph. 

Mclnnis, Marquis L Mendenhall, Miss. Soph. 

Mclnnis, Mrs. Marquis L Mendenhall, Miss. Senior 

McKellar, Mrs. B. F York, Ala. Special 

McKenzie, Joseph D Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

McKewen, Mrs. Lillian H Port Gibson, Miss. Post Grad. 

McKewen, Mrs. Marjorie L Scooba, Miss. Post Grad. 

McLain, Patricia Ann Richton, Miss. Fresh. 

McLarty, Cleylon Lee..._— . ....Oxford, Miss. Soph. 

McLaurin, Mrs. G. A State Line, Miss. Senior 

McLaurin, Mrs. Sara B Ellisville, Miss. Junior 

McLean, C. E., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 



176 



Register for 1946-47 



McLelland, Charles G Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

McLemore, Harry K. Hattiesburg-, Miss. Fresh. 

McLemore, Kenneth L Roxie, Miss. Fresh. 

McLemore, Ramona M Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

McLeod, Drucie Lee Leakesville, Miss. Junior 

McLeod, Mrs. Emma Vernal, Miss. Special 

McLeod, Hugh C, Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

McLeod, John A Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

McLeod, Marvin, Jr Mt. Olive, Miss. Fresh. 

McLeod, William Vincent Leakesville, Miss. Senior 

McMahan, Burnelle Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

McMahen, Andrea Carolyn Union, Miss. . Junior 

McMillan, William L Winfield, Ala. Fresh. 

McMillon, Juanita Kosciusko, Miss. Senior 

McMullan, Mary Kathryn Decatur, Miss. Senior 

McMullan, Melton L Decatur, Miss. Junior 

McMullan, Myrtice Decatur, Miss. Junior 

McMurphy, Mrs. Marguerite H Isola, Miss. Junior 

McNair, Hilda Mae Mt. Olive, Miss. Fresh. 

McNair, Walter Scott Mt. Olive, Miss. Fresh. 

McNeese, Lawrence A J — Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

McNeese, Robert L Hattiesburg, Miss. ^-Fresh. 

McQueen, A. B Collins, Miss. Fresh. 

McQueen, Bessie Irene Collins, Miss. Soph. 

McQueen, Dale C Pinola, Miss. Fresh. 

McQueen, Vernell Collins, Miss. Soph. 

McQueen, Mrs. W. A —-Picayune, Miss. Junior 

McRaney, Hilda Grafton Decatur, Miss. Senior 

McRaney, Mac Graham Collins, Miss. Senior 

McRaney, Robert Rex Collins, Miss. — Soph. 

McRaney, Shirley Grace Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

McRee, Everett Jackson, Miss Special 

McRee, Troy T Richton, Miss. __, Fresh. 

McSwain, Harlan B Hattiesburg-, Miss. Soph. 

McSwain, Jack L — Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

McSwain, Ruth Elizabeth Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

McVey, Clara Sue Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Machen, Sarah Dell Alexander City, Ala. Soph. 

Maddox, Barbara K Magee, Miss. Fresh. 

Madison, Jack V Biloxi, Miss. Soph. 

Magee, Emmitt E Mt. Olive, Miss. Fresh. 

Magee, Ethel Ray Mt. Olive, Miss. _— Junior 

Magee, Dovie Tylertown, Miss. Senior 

Magee, Guy M Mt. Olive, Miss. Senior 

Magee, Herbert L Mt. Olive, Miss. Fresh. 

Magee, Mary Jo Shreveport, La. Post. Grad. 

Magee, Nellie G Brookhaven, Miss. Special 

Magee, Mrs. 0. O Kokomo, Miss. Senior 

Magers, Mrs. L. L Summit, Miss. Junior 

Majure, Mrs. A. L Madden, Miss. Fresh. 

Majure, Ruth B Meridian, Miss. Senior 

Mallette, Malcolm Lucedale, Miss. Junior 

Malone, Mrs. Ethel Jane Lucedale, Miss. _ Soph. 

Malone, Maurice L. Lucedale, Miss. Senior 

Mangin, Albert, Jr Biloxi, Miss. Junior 

Mangum, Arther J., Jr Mendenhall, Miss. Soph. 

Mangum, Charles H Magee, Miss. Senior 



177 



Register for 1946-47 



Mangum, Elwyn Ray. Magee, Miss. Fresh. 

Mangum, James E..„ : Mendenhall, Miss. Senior 

Manning, Mary B McComb, Miss. Post Grad. 

Manson, John D J _ Lumberton, Miss. Fresh. 

Maples, Darwin M Perkinston, Miss. Soph. 

Maples, Dudley M Perkinston, Miss. __*. Fresh. 

Mardis, Charles Edward Natchez, Miss. Fresh. 

Marsh, Carol W Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Marsh, Levi C Natchez, Miss. Fresh. 

Marshall, Edward A Gulf port, Miss. Soph. 

Marshall, Marion Francis Natchez, Miss. Soph. 

Marsinkus, Harry P Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Martello, Louis Edward Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Martin, Boyd Davis Keyser, W. Va. Senior 

Martin, Clara McLeod Tylertown, Miss. —Junior 

Martin, Edna M Jayess, Miss. Senior 

Martin, Elaine S Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Martin, Elizabeth Eleana_.„ .- . Long Beach, Miss. Senior 

Martin, Gerald L Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Martin, Helen Elizabeth Wiggins, Miss. Senior 

Martin, Ikie Belle Shubuta, Miss. Fresh. 

Martin, Mrs. J. C, Jr State Line, Miss. Senior 

Martin, Lila Marian Raleigh, Miss. Soph. 

Martin, Patricia Ann Laurel, Miss. Fresh. 

Martin, Rae Alice Gulf port, Miss. Soph. 

Martin, Ralph L Jackson, Miss. Fresh. 

Martin, Mrs. T. L Long Beach, Miss. Senior 

Martin, William E., Jr Wiggins, Miss. Soph. 

Massengale, Dorothy Earle Collins, Miss. Fresh. 

Massengale, James Ellis Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Massey, Robert N Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Matheny, Cora Virginia Waynesboro, Miss. Senior 

Mathis, Byron E Beaumont, Miss. Junior 

Mathis, Charles Edward Beaumont, Miss. Junior 

Matlock, Mrs. Ola Kate Little Rock, Miss. Senior 

Mawk, James B Slate Spring, Miss. Soph. 

Maxwell, Kenneth R Long Beach, Miss. Soph. 

May, Mrs. Ivon F Biloxi, Miss. Junior 

May, John Edwin Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

May, Lloyd M j__ Tylertown, Miss. Fresh. 

May, Maxine Union, Miss. Soph. 

Mayfield, Arleane Laurel, Miss. — - Junior 

Mayfield, Lottie L. Taylorsville, Miss. Junior 

Mayfield, Mary Cecile Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Mayo, Asa Jefferson Quitman, Miss. Fresh. 

Mayton, Henri E _*._ Fulton, Ala. Junior 

Meadows, John Edward Magee, Miss. Soph. 

Meadows, Mrs. John E Magee, Miss. Junior 

Meadows, Mary Sue Richton, Miss. Fresh. 

Melton, Charles Leon Pachuta, Miss. Fresh. 

Melton, Mabel Andrews West, Miss. Junior 

Menasco, James B Shubuta, Miss. Fresh. 

Mercier, Albert L Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Meredith, Arthur E.„. * Shelby, Miss. Fresh. 

Messer, Donald C Sumrall, Miss. Fresh. 

Middleton, Julia Mae Roxie, Miss. Fresh. 

Miles, Bobbye Jean Pulaski, Miss. Fresh. 



178 



Register for 1946-47 



Miles, Marjorie Nell Morton, Miss. ^__. Senior 

Miller, Birl Brown Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Miller, Herbert G., Jr. Biloxi, Miss. Junior 

Miller, Emery James Fayette, Miss. Fresh. 

Miller, Jessie P — Biloxi, Miss. Junior 

Miller, Marvin K Mt. Olive, Miss. Soph. 

Miller, Neadra T Pascagoula, Miss. Special 

Miller, Richard C Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Miller, Vernon T Prentiss, Miss. Soph. 

Miller, William G Wiggins, Miss. ........ Soph. 

Milloy, Ralph M ^—Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Milner, Mrs. Ethel Mae Mt. Olive, Miss. Junior 

Milner, J. Dunston Ft. Worth, Tex..... Junior 

Milner, Ruth Bernice Hillsboro, Miss. Senior 

Minshew, Ben Wylie Dossville, Miss. Soph. 

Minton, Ella Belle Brookhaven, Miss. Junior 

Minton, Onie Fay Brookhaven, Miss. Special 

Mitchell, Mrs. C. H Picayune, Miss. Special 

Mitchell, Irene Carriere, Miss. Junior 

Mitchell, James Daniel Hattiesburg, Miss. ^.~. Soph. 

Mitchell, Wanda Louise Canton, Miss. Senior 

Mixon, Christopher John Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Mixon, Marguerite Ouida Magnolia, Miss. Soph. 

Mizelle, Mildred H Pascagoula, Miss. Soph. 

Moak, Mary K Philadelphia, Miss. Junior 

Moncrief, Winfred H J ~- West Point, Miss. Soph. 

Montague, Frank D Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Montague, Richard A Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Montgomery, Jack McComb, Miss. J .~ Post Grad. 

Montgomery, John Arnold, Jr Natchez, Miss. Fresh. 

Montgomery, Mrs. Lillie B Louin, Miss. Junior 

Montgomery, Mrs. L. S Summit, Miss. Senior 

Montgomery, Shirley Jean Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Moody, Mrs. H. T Laurel, Miss. Senior 

Moody, Kathryn * Hattiesburg, Miss. Special 

Moody, Laura E _*_ Gulf port, Miss. Special 

Moody, William M Gulfport, Miss. Fresh. 

Mooney, John Martin Seminary, Miss. Fresh. 

Mooney, Marie Seminary, Miss. Senior 

Mooney, Terrye Lee Moselle, Miss. Senior 

Moore, Arthur A Seminary, Miss. Senior 

Moore,, Billy P - Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Moore, Elizabeth B Hattiesburg, Miss. Post Grad. 

Moore, Hazel B Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Moore, Jimmie F Baxterville, Miss. Fresh. 

Moore, Lorene Frances Smithville, Miss. Junior 

Moore, Margaret I Hattiesburg, Miss. Post Grad. 

Moore, Martha Kathryn Seminary, Miss. Junior 

Moore, Martha Lorene Seminary, Miss. Junior 

Moore, Opal E Perkinston, Miss. Junior 

Moore, Sadie F Carthage, Miss. Senior 

Moore, Sara Elizabeth McComb, Miss. Senior 

Moore, William Frank Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Moore, William Hilton Laurel, Miss. _____ ..Soph. 

Moran, Joan Joy Picayune, Miss. __. Fresh. 

Moran, Mrs. Neva M Gulfport, Miss. Junior 

Morgan, Mrs. Annie Merle Pulaski, Miss. ...Soph. 



179 



Register for 1946-47 



Morgan, Hilton E * Baton Rogue, La. Soph. 

Morgan, Iris Lavada ..Morgantown, Miss. Senior 

Morgan, O. M Clyo, Ga. * Special 

Morgan, Mrs. Olin R Moselle, Miss Junior 

Morgan, Zelma Hortense Booneville, Miss. Senior 

Morris, Byron F Columbia, Miss. ... Fresh. 

Morris, Erma L Seminary, Miss. Junior 

Morris, Hilda M Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Morris, Howard E. Sumrall, Miss. Fresh. 

Morris, John S Gulf port, Miss. _ J _ Fresh. 

Morris, Mrs. Kathryn L. Ocean Springs, Miss. Senior 

Morris, Lovelle A. Columbia, Miss. Soph. 

Morris, Newman William Sanford, Miss. Junior 

Morris, Tommye LaNelle Gulfport, Miss. Fresh. 

Morris, William Mack Columbia, Miss. Soph. 

Morrison, Jessie H.__— Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Morrison, Mary Grace Heidelberg, Miss. Senior 

Mosley, James H Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Mosley, Mrs. Roy Quitman, Miss. Senior 

Moss, Juanita Union Church, Miss. .... Senior 

Mott, Mrs. Cecil Mendenhall, Miss. Junior 

Mullinax, Alta M . Liberty, Tenn. Junior 

Mullins, Abner F Mendenhall, Miss. Junior 

Mullins, Jerry C Petal, Miss. Junior 

Munn, Jack D Sumrall, Miss. Junior 

Murphy, Gerard L Petal, Miss. Soph. 

Murray, Charles E *__ Gulfport, Miss. _- - Soph. 

Murray, Clyde C, Jr Purvis, Miss. Soph. 

Murray, Eline Harrisville, Miss. Junior 

Murray, James Purvis, Miss. Fresh. 

Murray, Rachel Summerland, Miss. Fresh. 

Murray, Verna M. Pascagoula, Miss. Senior 

Murry, Charles D ^ Morton, Miss. Junior 

Murry, Frances Evia Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Musser, Orville E Purvis, Miss. Soph. 

Myers, Mrs. Hattie Lee Pinola, Miss. Junior 

Myers, Billie Jean.....— Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Myers, Jaynie M. McComb, Miss. Special 

Myers, William L Mobile, Ala. Fresh. 

Myres, Nettie James Philadelphia, Miss. Junior 

Myrick, Odis J. Poplarville, Miss. __.. Junior 



.Seminary, Miss. Soph. 

.Seminary, Miss. Soph. 

.Seminary, Miss. Fresh. 

.Brookhaven, Miss. Soph. 

.Foxworth, Miss. Fresh. 

.Soso, Miss. Senior 

.Darlove, Miss. Junior 

.Hattiesburg, Miss. —Fresh. 



Napier, Herschal L 

Napier, James A. _, 

Napier, Joseph 

Nation, Warren B. 

Neal, Hollie Lee 

Neal, Ida Mae 

Neal, Maxine 

Neilson, Laurits C. .*— 

Nelson, Arnold F. Union, Miss. _ _„ Senior 

Nelson, R. Essie Hattiesburg, Miss. — Senior 

Nelson, Helen Elizabeth Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Nelson, Sam J Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Nester, Lois Myrtle Lake, Miss. Senior 

Netterville, Bill Petal, Miss. Fresh. 

Neville, Edwin J .... Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Newcomb, James H Richton, Miss. Special 



180 



Register for 1946-47 



Newman, Mrs. A.M Meadville, Miss. Senior 

Newman, Betty Jean Meadville, Miss. _ Senior 

Newman, Charles S Laurel, Miss. Soph. 

Newman, George D., Jr Utica, Miss. * Junior 

Newman, Patricia Ann Laurel, Miss. Fresh. 

Newman, Robert E Columbia, Miss. ._ Junior 

Nichols, Pearl New Augusta, Miss. Senior 

Nicholls, Mrs. D. W Conehatta, Miss. Post Grad. 

Nichols, Mary Anna....- Conehatta, Miss. Junior 

Nicola, Jack F Vicksburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Nix, Viola Monticello, Miss. Junior 

Nobles, Bennie Ray Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Nobles, Bobby J Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Nobles, James B .— Dayton, Ohio Soph. 

Noblitt, Horace D Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Noblitt, Wilbur D Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Noel, Dahlia Hillsboro, Miss. Senior 

Noel, Marvis E Hillsboro, Miss. Senior 

Norris, Lurline Ivy Taylorsville, Miss. Senior 

Norsworthy, Eddie Mae Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Norsworthy, Ernest L. * Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Norton, Frank L Gulfport, Miss. Fresh. 

Norton, William Dewey Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Novak, Frankie Robertsdale, Ala. Soph. 

Nunnery, Hilton James Liberty, Miss. Soph. 

Nunnery, Jeane L Liberty, Miss. Special 

Nyman, John W— Escatawpa, Miss. Fresh. 

Odom, Mrs. H. C - New Augusta, Miss. Post Grad. 

Odom, Irma Lois Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Odom, Jane Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Odom, Katherine Sanatorium, Miss. Soph. 

Odom, Louie W Sylvester, Ga. Senior 

Odom, Louise N .— Foxworth, Miss. Junior 

Odom, Wilmer C Stonewall, Miss. Junior 

Ogletree, Powell G McDonald, Miss. Junior 

O'Neal, Alice * Rolling Fork, Miss. Junior 

O'Neal, Jeanette Perkinston, Miss. Fresh. 

O'Neil, Myra Meridian, Miss. Junior 

Osbourn, William C. Bay St. Louis, Miss. Fresh. 

Owen, James Ray Nowatta, Okla. Soph. 

Owen, Walter C Gulfport, Miss. ...Special 

Owens, A. C— * Mize, Miss. Freah. 

Pace, Era Faye Hogansville, Ga. Fresh. 

Pace, James K Shubuta, Miss. Fresh. 

Pace, Margie Elaine Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Page, Horace Gulfport, Miss. Fresh. 

Palmer, Edward M Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Palmer, Mrs. Lanora Lee Lumberton, Miss. Senior 

Pamplin, Maude Golden..... Portland, Ark. Senior 

Pardue, Mildred Lumberton, Miss. ...Junior 

Parish, Alfred H. Crystal Springs, Miss. Fresh. 

Parish, James K Mt. Olive, Miss. Senior 

Parker, Alonzo C, Jr . Petal, Miss. Soph. 

Parker, Mrs. Bernice S Saucier, Miss. Junior 

Parker, Mrs. Estelle Cooley Pascagoula, Miss. Senior 

Parker, James E j_ Senatobia, Miss. Fresh. 

Parker, Mrs. Mary Jane Moselle, Miss. Senior 



181 



Register for 1946-47 



Parker, Vivienne Ruth Sumrall, Miss. Fresh. 

Parker, William Howard Moselle, Miss. Soph. 

Parsons, Juanita Tylertown, Miss. ______ Senior 

Patch, Frances L Lumberton, Miss. Fres.h 

Patch, Gloria Jeanne Lumberton, Miss. Fres.h 

Patrick, Mrs. Hazel W. .... . Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Patridge, Kathryn Lodi, Miss. Junior 

Patten, Charles Y Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Patten, Thomas W., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Patterson, Alice B Wiggins, Miss. Junior 

Patterson, Elba C. Smith Raleigh, Miss. Soph. 

Patterson, Hershel T Mize, Miss. Junior 

Patterson, Lewis Winzel Sumrall, Miss. _. . Fresh. 

Patterson, Patrick J _. Mobile, Ala. Soph. 

Patterson, Walter Jack Perkinston, Miss. Junior 

Payne, Dorman Troy Winder, Ga. Fresh. 

Peagler, John S Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Pearce, Theda E Brooklyn, Miss. Soph. 

Pearson, Mrs. Alice M. Perkinston, Miss. Junior 

Pearson, Mrs. Edna M. Nicholson, Miss. Senior 

Pearson, Lee C Nicholson, Miss. Soph. 

Pearson, Mrs. Narvel Carriere, Miss. .—..Soph. 

Pearson, Thelma Ann Laurel, Miss. Fresh. 

Pearson, Walter G Laurel, Miss. Fresh. 

Pendergrass, Orell B Magee, Miss. Soph. 

Penin, Carlos S Holguin, Cuba Fresh. 

Pentecost, Elanor Jane Biloxi, Miss. Fresh. 

Penticost, Van Lowery_____— Biloxi, Miss. Soph. 

Pepper, Lester C. Perkinston, Miss. Fresh. 

Perkins, Frances Independence, Miss. Junior 

Perkins, Mary Bay St. Louis, Miss. Soph. 

Perkins, Norma Gex Bay St. Louis, Miss. Post Grad. 

Perritt, Mrs. Mildred F -—Wesson, Miss. Junior 

Perry, Robert B —State Line, Miss. Junior 

Peters, Bernard Philip Jackson, Miss. FresH. 

Peterson, Florence Inez Progress, Miss. Junior 

Pettis, Mary Ellen Quitman, Miss. Fresh. 

Pettus, Mrs. Janice R Eden, Miss. Senior 

Phillips, Carroll O _— Petal, Miss. Junior 

Phillips, Dorothy Lorene Newton, Miss. Junior 

Phillips, John M Macon, Miss. Fresh. 

Phillips, Lorena Lee Petal, Miss. Junior 

Phillips, Luna Russ Carthage, Miss. .*. Junior 

Phillips, Malcolm C Newton, Miss. Fresh. 

Phillips, Robert E Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Phillips, Shelley H _. Macon, Miss. Soph. 

Phillips, Tom Rhea, Jr Mammoth Springs, Miss. _____ Soph. 

Phillips, Van Allen Mammoth Springs, Miss. Soph. 

Pickering, Jesse Anita Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Pickle, Eva Nell Amory, Miss. Fresh. 

Pierce, Billye Faye Collins, Miss. Fresh. 

Pierce, Ernest C Kreole, Miss. Fresh. 

Pierce, Sam E Collins, Miss. _ Senior 

Pitalo, Anthony P Biloxi, Miss. Soph. 

Pittman, Fay Foxworth, Miss. Fresh. 

Pittman, Lanita H Holly Springs, Miss. Senior 

Pittman, Margaret Elizabeth Collins, Miss. Soph. 



182 



Register for 1946-47 



Pittman, Margaret Elizabeth Columbia, Miss. Junior 

Pittman, Omar H Walthall, Miss. Soph. 

Pittman, Verda W Bucatunna, Miss. Senior 

Piatt, Hannis E State Line, Miss. Fresh. 

Polk, Mrs. E. E Mt. Olive, Miss. Junior 

Polk, Jacqueline Irene Prentiss, Miss. ..— Junior 

Polk, Lynden Rita Lumberton, Miss. Senior 

Polk, Martha Jane ...Columbia, Miss. Senior 

Polk, Marvin F Tupelo, Miss. Soph. 

Pollitz, Elma Florence »_ Biloxi, Miss. Senior 

Poole, Verlee G Laurel, Miss. Senior 

Poore, Mrs. Lela S Laurel, Miss. Senior 

Pope, Thomas F .Collins, Miss. Fresh. 

Pope, Tommie Carolyn Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Porter, Billie Sue Moselle, Miss. Junior 

Porter, Carrie T ^—Mississippi City, Miss. .—.—Special 

Porter, Emma Pauline McCall Creek, Miss. Senior 

Porter, James L Gulfport, Miss. Fresh. 

Porter, Mark M Meridian, Miss. Fresh. 

Porter, Vivian E Yazoo City, Miss. Senior 

Portero, Tony Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Posey, Edna Ruth..... Purvis, Miss. Junior 

Potter, Mrs. Melissa D Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Powe, Mrs. Gwendolyn Waynesboro, Miss. Fresh. 

Powell, Curtis Lee Soso, Miss. Soph. 

Powell, Mrs. H. W Carriere, Miss. Special 

Powell, Margaret Jean ..Carriere, Miss. Soph. 

Powell, Mary Amanda Collinsville, Miss. Senior 

Powell, William Seminary, Miss. Junior 

Powell, W. C ^— Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Poynton, Sadie S Biloxi, Miss. Fresh. 

Prentiss, Armand E Biloxi, Miss. Soph. 

Prescott, Elizabeth M Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Prescott, George M Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Prescott, William E Morgantown, Miss. Junior 

Presley, Charlie Ray Carthage, Miss. .... Fresh. 

Price, Mrs. Elam Bogue Chitto, Miss. Senior 

Price, Helen Irene Moss Point, Miss. Soph. 

Price, Hiram M Madden, Miss. Junior 

Price, Mrs. J. B Bogue Chitto, Miss. Junior 

Price, Mrs. J. H Brookhaven, Miss. Senior 

Price, Mavis W Meridian, Miss. Soph. 

Price, Ruby Irene Ethel, Miss. Junior 

Pridgen, Mrs. Hazel S.__ — Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Prince, Ina Louise Magee, Miss. Soph. 

Prine, Colonia Mae.— Jackson, Miss. Fresh. 

Prine, Joe S Columbia, Miss. Junior 

Prine, Monita Petal, Miss. Soph. 

Pringle, Ann B Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Pringle, Mrs. J. Leon...^ Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Pritchard, Edward Union Church, Miss. Fresh. 

Proffitt, Wanna Arree Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Pruitt, Dorris Ann Weathersby, Miss. Fresh. 

Pucheu, Harvey A Gulfport, Miss. Fresh. 

Purvis, Mrs. G. T Purvis, Miss. Fresh. 

Purvis, Martha Nell Columbia, Miss. Senior 

Purvis, R. T Star, Miss. Junior 



183 



Register for 1946-47 



Quave, Louis L Biloxi, Miss. Fresh. 

Quave, Russell . Biloxi, Miss. Junior 

Quin, Ernest D., Jr McComb, Miss. Fresh. 

Quin, Kermit W Columbia, Miss. Soph. 

Quinn, Jack K _* Williston, Fla. Fresh. 

Ragland, Evan F Jackson, Miss. Senior 

Rainey, James C Hattiesburg, Miss. J — . Fresh. 

Rainey, Mary Ada Moselle, Miss. Junior 

Rainey, Minnie Mae Moselle, Miss. Junior 

Ramsay, Margaret Anne Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Ramsay, Mrs. Ruth Latimer Gulfport, Miss. Post Grad. 

Randall, L. S .*__ Gulfport, Miss. Soph. 

Randle, Allen Karl State Line, Miss. Soph. 

Rankin, Edward Sandy Hook, Miss. Fresh. 

Rankin, Inez Dorsey, Miss. Junior 

Rankin, Joe W Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Rasco, Mrs. Laverne ."Pascagoula, Miss. ._.__. Senior 

Ratcliff, Mrs. Floyd...,. Meadville, Miss. Senior 

Ratcliff, Walter R Wesson, Miss. Soph. 

La wis, Carl E Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Rawls, Howard Paxton Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Rawson, Mavis Pearl Dossville, Miss. Senior 

Rawson, Waudean Dossville, Miss. Senior 

Ray, J. V ....Drew, Miss. Junior 

Kay burn, Hilda Pearl ^... Wiggins, Miss. Junior 

Read Elizabeth Ann Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Recmos, Freddy F Guatemala City, Guat. .... Soph. 

Recinos, James Guatemala City, Guat. ■ Soph. 

Rfcddmg, Daisy Hattiesburg, Miss. Post Grad. 

Reed, John R Tylertown, Miss. Fresh. 

Ree\ es, Clara Ruth, Miss. Special 

Reeves, Hopkins, H. . Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Reeves, Mary Ethel H Bogue Chitto, Miss. Special 

Reeves, Robert L Natchez, Miss. Fresh. 

Register, Doris J. Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

R^id, Jack H Lucedale, Miss. Soph. 

Reid, Perrin W Petal, Miss. Fresh. 

Renfroe, Travisteen Belzoni, Miss. Senior 

Reynolds, Henry H., Jr „. Starkville, Miss. Soph. 

Reynolds, Myrna Virginia Purvis, Miss. Fresh. 

Rhian, Lloyd, E., Jr. Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Rhoads, Hester T Holly Bluff, Miss. Fresh. 

Rhodes, G. Marie : Collinsville, Miss. Junior 

Rhodes, Otho Dan Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Rhodes, Vera R ^— McComb, Miss. Special 

Rhyne, Curtis L... Prichard, Ala. Soph. 

Rials, Annie Laurie Jayess, Miss. Junior 

Rice, Edith Ellen Hub, Miss. Fresh. 

Rice, Willard C Hub, Miss. _^— Junior 

Richardson, Clyde E Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Richardson, Mrs. Clyde E Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Richardson, Elvin C. Gholson, Miss. Soph. 

Richardson, Eva Dee Brookhaven, Miss. ... Soph. 

Richardson, Ezra B Mooreville, Miss. Junior 

Richardson, Lanell K Center, Miss. Junior 

Richardson, Mark Macon, Miss. Junior 

Richie, Jean L Gulfport, Miss. Fresh. 



184 



Register for 194^-47 



Ricks, Rubye Emma Union, Miss. „ J __. Junior 

Ridings, Barbara Waynesboro, Miss. Soph. 

Rigler, Mrs. Ava M._— -_ - Philadelphia, Miss. Post Grad. 

Riley, Betty Jane Quitman, Miss. Fresh. 

Riley, Louis S., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Riley, Walter E Quitman, Miss. Soph. 

Riley, William F Newhebron, Miss. Senior 

Rini, Joseph T Leakesville, Miss. Fresh. 

Risher, Mellie Belle Meridian, Miss. Junior 

Ritenbaugh, Wesley C Muskegon, Mich. Soon. 

Rivers, Hugene Union, Miss. Junior 

Robbins, Ebbie Williams Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Roberts, Annie Laurie Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Roberts, Edwin J Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Robert, Ella N Vicksburg, Miss. Senior 

Roberts, Mrs. Julia M Bogue Chitto, Miss. Soph. 

Roberts, Mrs. H. D Leakesville, Miss. Senior 

Roberts, James C, Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Roberts, Jeanne : Centreville, Miss. Senior 

Roberts, John P Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Roberts, Mrs. Louise E Richton, Miss. Fresh. 

Roberts, Margaret R Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Roberts, Matt Sheppard Ocean Springs, Miss. Soph. 

Roberts, Montine P Jacksonville, Fla. Post Grad. 

Robertson, Charles E Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Robertson, Elsie Gloster, Miss. Junior 

Robertson, Howard N Columbia, Miss. Soph. 

Robertson, Maureen Liberty, Miss. Soph. 

Robicheau, Alice Rosalie Hattiesburg, Miss. Special 

Robin, Patricia N Bay St. Louis, Miss. Junior 

Robinson, Blanche -Gulfport, Miss. Fresh. 

Robinson, Charles R Purvis, Miss. Fresh. 

Robinson, Herman I Atmore, Ala. Fresh. 

Robinson, Lucius L Memphis, Tenn. Soph. 

Robinson, Robert G Mendenhall, Miss. Post Grad. 

Robinson, Ruthel Alice Fulton, Miss. Junior 

Rockhold, John L., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Rockwell, William E Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Roeslein, Rose Ann Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Rogers, Mrs. Albert Taylorsville, Miss. Fresh. 

Rogers, Alma Geraldine Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Rogers, Bobbie Norma -— Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Rogers, Delia Collins, Miss. Post Grad. 

Rogers, Earl D Natchez, Miss. Fresh. 

Rogers, Effie Delle Newhebron, Miss. Senior 

Rogers, Mrs. Nora N Collins, Miss. Senior 

Rogers, Geneva Vondeen Taylorsville, Miss. Senior 

Rogers, Lester Ras Collins, Miss. Junior 

Rogers, Nora S _.— ..Collins, Miss. Senior 

Rogers, Mrs. Oby Collins, Miss. Junior 

Rogers, Reba P. Taylorsville, Miss. Fresh. 

Rogers, Mrs. Vera G. Bay Springs, Miss. _■_*__ Junior 

Rose, Loise Cook Grenada, Miss. Junior 

Rosenbaum, Sidney L Meridian, Miss. Junior 

Ross, Barbara B Gulfport, Miss. Fresh. 

Ross, Douglas R. Seminary, Miss. Fresh. 

Ross, Eugene A Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 



185 



Register for 1946-47 



Ross, Harry A. 

Ross, Kathleen Emma. 

Ross, Mildred ; 

Rosso, Samuel W. 



-Gulfport, Miss. Fresh. 

-Mississippi City, Miss. Senior 

-Puckett, Miss. Junior 

-Centreville, Miss. Fresh. 

Rouse, Mrs. Bertie Lott Picayune, Miss. ____. Senior 

Rouse, H. Ronald Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Rouse, Robert M Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Rouse, Willie A Lucedale, Miss. Special 

Rowell, Marian Picayune, Miss. Fresh. 



Rowley, Joseph C. 

Royalty, J. C 

Runnels, Fred A._ 



—Beaumont, Miss. Soph. 

-Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 



Magee, Miss. Soph. 

Magee, Miss. Fresh. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Logtown, Miss. _* Junior 

Petal, Miss. Fresh. 

Bay St. Louis, Miss. •_ Senior 

Sumrall, Miss. Soph. 

Pascagoula, Miss. Fresh. 

Pascagoula, Miss. Fresh. 

Pascagoula, Miss. Fresh. 

Bay St. Louis, Miss Senior 

Mt. Olive, Miss. Fresh. 

Rutledge, Mrs. John Sandersville, Miss. Senior 

Ryals, Edith Brookhaven, Miss. Junior 

Ryan, Phillip B Kaufman, Texas Fresh. 

Sackler, Alvin Hattiesburg, Miss. Special 

Saenz, Roberto Guatemala, C. A. * Fresh. 



Runnels, Katherine 

Runnels, Pearl R 

Russ, Howell A. ^ 

Russ, Kenneth L 

Russ, Pauline A 

Russell, Doris Nell 

Russum, Barbara Anne 

Russum, J. B. 

Russum, Robert P. 

Rutherford, Linwood L. 

Rutland, Delton L.. 



Saliba, Anna K. 

Salter, Ina Lenell 

Sanders, Albert T., Jr. 
Sanders, Jack G. 

Sanders, Otho S. 



Sanderson, Mrs. A. W. 
Sandifer, Shellie. 



Sandling, Ola Frances 

Sanford, Billye Merle.- 

Sanford, Norman L 

Sarphie, Joseph E. 



Sasser, Mrs. Leslie 

Saucier, Edward C 

Saucier, Forrest E., Jr.. 
Saucier, Luvenia Marie- 
Saucier, Martha Ann 

Saulters, Elsie E - 

Saulters, LaRue 



Saxon, Mary Joyce 

Seale, Albert J 

Scanlan, Marie Elizabeth... .*- 

Scarborough, Jacqueline 

Scarborough, Lester L. 

Schaening, Elba Maria 

Schillereff, Ralph H 

Schmelling, Edwin A. 

Schrader, Cecil. 



Scofield, Margaret 

Scott, Austin F 



Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Philadelphia, Miss. Senior 

Baton Rouge, La. Soph. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Heidelberg, Miss. Soph. 

Ellisville, Miss. Senior 

Crystal Springs, Miss. Special 

Silver City, Miss. Junior 

Collins, Miss. Fresh. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Bogue Chitto, Miss. . Junior 

Pascagoula, Miss. Fresh. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Bay St. Louis, Miss. Senior 

Sumrall, Miss. Junior 

Prentiss, Miss. Fresh. 

j Prentiss, Miss. Junior 

Prichard, Ala. Soph. 

Long Beach, Miss. Soph. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Bude, Miss. Junior 

Bude, Miss. Soph. 

Quebradillas, P. R. Senior 

Pascagoula, Miss. Soph. 

Biloxi, Miss. Soph. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

.Columbus, Miss. Senior 

....Biloxi, Miss. Fresh. 

186 



Register for 1946-47 



Scott, Cretola Fulton, Miss. __ Soph. 

Scott, Flora C Hillsboro, Miss. Post Grad. 

Scott, Max W Petal, Miss. Fresh. 

Scott, Robert V Petal, Miss. Senior 

Scott, Vernon F ^—Louisville, Miss. Fresh. 

Scruggs, Dorothy Ruth Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Seal, Oren L Picayune, Miss. Senior 

Seal, Susanna Poplarville, Miss. Junior 

Seal, Walter E Poplarville, Miss. Senior 

Seale, Albert J ^— Long Beach, Miss. Soph. 

Seale, Norma Picayune, Miss. Fresh. 

Segars, Charles B Winfield, Ala. Junior 

Sekul, Anthonyj Biloxi, Miss. Soph. 

Sellers, Mrs. Allen Meridian, Miss. .._.__ Soph. 

Sellers, Alma D Lumberton, Miss. Soph. 

Sellers, Clara L . Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Sellers, George A DeSoto, Miss. Fresh. 

Sessions, Leslie Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Seward, Pauline T Deemer, Miss. Junior 

Sewell, Mrs. Olga S Biloxi, Miss. Special 

Seymour, Barbara Biloxi, Miss. Senior 

Sharp, Burton, Jr Columbia, Miss. Soph. 

Shattles, Elom T. _*_ Brooklyn, Miss. Junior 

Shattles, Herschel R Brooklyn, Miss. Soph. 

Shattles, Mattie Brooklyn, Miss. Senior 

Shattles, Vernell Brooklyn, Miss. Soph. 

Shaw, Laverna Perkinston, Miss Junior 

Sherman, Brunetta B Lena, Miss. Junior 

Sherman, Flora Hinton ■!_ Richton, Miss. Fresh. 

Shields, Marie C Union Church, Miss. Junior 

Shields, Thomas M Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Shipp, Russell P Calhoun City, Miss. Senior 

Shirley, Paul D Forest, Miss. Fresh. 

Shoemake, Albert H Laurel, Miss. Senior 

Shoemake, Herman R Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Shope, Mrs. Jessie Faye Calhoun City, Miss. Senior 

Shows, Mrs. E. J Lucedale, Miss. Soph. 

Shows, Essie Geraldine Magee, Miss. Fresh. 

Shows, Imogene Susan Sanford, Miss. Senior 

Shows, James C Moselle, Miss. —Senior 

Shows, Willa Dean Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Sierakowski, Frances Hattiesburg, Miss. Special 

Sigrest, Bobbie Jo Enterprise, Miss. Fresh. 

Sikes, Sybil Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Sikes, Richard A. Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Simmons, Albert W McNeil, Miss. Special 

Simmons, John P Tylertown, Miss. Soph. 

Simmons, Laura Jane McLain, Miss. Soph. 

Simmons, Lester L *— McComb, Miss. Post Grad. 

Simmons, Lewis L —~ Moss Point, Miss Fresh. 

Simmons, Mary Katherine Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Simmons, Myrna Elaine Tylertown, Miss. Junior 

Simmons, Mrs. Flora S Brooklyn, Miss. Senior 

Simmons, Ora Lee Leland, Miss. Fresh. 

Simpson, Virgie B Poplarville, Miss. Soph. 

Sims, Jackson D Moselle, Miss. Fresh. 

Sims, Johnie Mack Panama, City. Fla. Soph. 



187 



Register for 1946-47 



Sims, John F., Jr * Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Sims, Melvin Reginald Houston, Miss. Soph. 

Sims, Reba Gail Bay Springs, Miss. Junior 

Sims, Rudolph H Moselle, Miss. Soph. 

Sims, Sawyer S Panama City, Fla. Senior 

Sinclair, Calvin F Braxton, Miss. Soph. 

Singley, Mary Jo J — Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Sistrunk, Ellene V. Jayess, Miss. Fresh. 

Sitts, Annie Ruth Hazlehurst, Miss. Fresh. 

Sitts, Mary Louise Hazlehurst, Miss. Junior 

Slade, Lina Mae Sumrall, Miss. Junior 

Slade, Pauline _^ Lumberton, Miss. Fresh. 

Slaton, Mrs. Mary Jeanne Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Slay, Glyn S Hazlehurst, Miss. Soph. 

Slay, Mrs. W. E Pinola, Miss. Senior 

Small, Alvin L Beaumont, Miss. Fresh. 

Smalley, Charles —Purvis, Miss. Post Grad. 



Smith, Mrs. Ada 

Smith, Alda Flo 

Smith, Alyne B 

Walker, Lee H 

Walker, Leland L 

Walker, Linnie Maude _ 

Walker, Mamie. 



Brookhaven, Miss. Special 

Tylertown, Miss. Senior 

Lucedale, Miss. Post Grad. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

.Eddiceton, Miss. Senior 

.Mendenhall, Miss. Fresh. 

.Pearlington, Miss. Special 



Walker, Norman G., Jr Lucedale, Miss. Fresh. 

Walker, Prentice J. Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Walker, Priscilla Ashland, Miss. Post Grad. 

Wall, Chris Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Wall, John, Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 



Wallace, Elizabeth G. 

Wallace, Harvey H. 

Wallace, John E 

Wallace, Roger W 

Wallace, Wesley E. 

Waller, Rioy 

Walley, Bertha Lee 

Walley, Ethel 

Walley, Jett W 

Walley, Lee Etta 

Walley, Maurice. 



.Petal, Miss. Fresh. 

Carthage, Miss. Junior 

Sanford, Miss. Fresh. 

. Carthage, Miss. Senior 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

.Shubuta, Miss. Soph. 

.Taylorsville, Miss. Senior 

.Ovett, Miss. Junior 

.Hurley, Miss. Senior 

.Ovett, Miss. Senior 

.Richton, Miss. Junior 



Wallsmith, Mrs. Gertrude G Lucedale, Miss. Fresh. 

Walter, Mary M Lake Monroe, Fla. Senior 



Walters, Emma Louise 

Walters, Howard V 

Walters, Thomas E. 

Walters, Willye Barbara... 
Walters, Woodie Jeanette. 

Ward, Mrs. Delma S 

Ward, George D. 

Ward, Henry L. 

Ward, James G 

Ward, M'dnnis L. 

Ward, Raymond W 

War d , Vernon 

Ward, Wendell L 

Ware, Carolyn 

Ware, James T. 



Krofton, Ala. *_ -Senior 

.Petal, Miss. Soph. 



Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

* Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

— Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Philadelphia, Miss. Fresh. 

Gulf port, Miss. Fresh. 

Purvis, Miss. Soph. 

Atmore, Ala. Fresh. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

_.^— —Lucedale, Miss. Fresh. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Long Beach, Miss. Senior 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 



188 



Register for 1946-47 



Ware, Joseph E Lucedale, Miss. Soph. 

Warren, Jasper N D'Lo, Miss. Junior 

Warren, Lucille Mary Wesson, Miss. Senior 

Warren, Sarah Elizabeth Jackson, Miss. Fresh. 

Washington, Mrs. Edith L Gulf port, Miss. ...Special 

Waters, Fred W Benton, Miss. Soph. 

Waters, Jack Fletcher Benton, Miss. Senior 

Waters, James Melvin Benton, Miss. Senior 

Watkins, Angus T —~ Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Watkins, Orell E Moselle, Miss. Junior 

Watkins, Warren H Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Watson, George R Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Watson, Helen C Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Watson, Richard N Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Watson, Rosemary , Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Watts, Betty Jean Canton, Miss. Senior 

Watts, Corinne Sumrall, Miss. Senior 

Watts, Everette R Sumrall, Miss. Soph. 

Watts, Jack T Columbia, Miss. Junior 

Watts, James H Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Watts, Lewis R Columbia, Miss. : Soph. 

Weathers, Webster L Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Weatherford, Mrs. S. E. L. Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Weaver, Lawrence E. D'Lo, Miss. Soph. 

Weaver, Levi P Atmore, Ala. Soph. 

Webb, Earl R Sumrall, Miss. _-.___.Soph. 

Webb, John H *— Columbia, Miss. Senior 

Webb, John W Sumrall, Miss. Soph. 

Webb, Robinson E. Hillsboro, Miss. Senior 

Webb, Mrs. Sammye S. Hillsboro, Miss. Soph. 

Webster, Jean __— Kosciusko, Miss. Senior 

Weeks, James W., Jr Moselle, Miss. Soph. 

Weeks, T. Lavell Purvis, Miss. Soph. 

Weems, Vertis L Carthage, Miss. Senior 

Weinacker, Howard E Mobile, Ala. Fresh. 

Welborn, Mrs. Ethel M Summerland, Miss. Senior 

Wells, Mrs. A. M Brookhaven, Miss. Senior 

Wells, Betsye Jean ___ Coldwater, Miss. Soph. 

Wells, Gussie Will Collins, Miss. Junior 

Wells, Doris Homerline Liberty, Miss. ___ . Junior 

Wells, Robert M Kreole, Miss. Soph. 

Wells, Tyman H Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Wells, Vernon E Kreole, Miss. Soph. 

Wesson, Mrs. Mary Elaine Wiggins, Miss. Senior 

Wesson, William H Wiggins, Miss. Senior 

West, Evelyn D Biloxi, Miss. Junior 

West, Kendall G Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

West, Letha F Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

West, Robert T Waynesboro, Miss. Fresh. 

Westbrook, Julius A Trenton, Miss. Fresh. 

Westbrook, Virginia Sue Taylorsville, Miss. Junior 

Westcott, George G Rock Hall, Md. Soph. 

Westerfield, Paul A Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Wheeler, Opal E Fulton, Miss. Senior 

Wheless, Sabra Miriam....,— . Hattiesburg, Miss. —Junior 

Whiddon, Ernest C Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

White, A. Lois Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 



189 



Register for 1946-47 



White, Beulah May Brookhaven, Miss. Fresh. 

White, Charles J Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

White, Donald Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

White, Edwin H ._ Kokomo, Miss. Fresh. 

White, Erin G Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

White, Garland Lee Brookhaven, Miss. Senior 

White, Harold T Wiggins, Miss. Junior 

White, Jack D Ocean Springs, Miss. Junior 

White, Joe F Hattiesburg, Miss. .—Fresh. 

White, Louise Brookhaven, Miss. Fresh. 



White, Rodger M 

Whittington, Olivero Quinn. 

Wicht, Jane 

Wiggins, Johnnie Dan 

Wilkes, Berny. 



-Gilbertown, Ala. Fresh. 

-Foxworth, Miss. Fresh. 

-Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

-Philadelphia, Miss. . Senior 

..Petal, Miss. Soph. 

Wilkerson, Frances E -Chickasaw, Ala. Post Grad. 

Wilkerson, Luther Franklin Biloxi, Miss. Special 

Wilks, Charles K ■ Columbia, Miss. _— Fresh. 

Williams, Alfred Keaton Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Williams, Mrs. AllyeneP. Wesson, Miss. Senior 

Williams, Catherine Lois Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Williams, Elaine Smithville, Miss. Soph. 

Williams, Mrs. Otis Leakesville, Miss. Junior 

Williams, Emmett J., Jr. ■ Hattiesburg, Miss. Special 

Williams, Geraldine West Enterprise, Miss. Fresh. 

Williams, Harold A Collins, Miss. Soph. 

Williams, Jeanne D . Bay St. Louis, Miss. Junior 

Williams, Jesse Summit, Miss. „._. Post Grad. 

Williams, Latamyr Voncille Morton, Miss. Fresh. 

Williams, Mrs. Lena Ellen Summit, Miss. Post Grad. 

Williams, Lois , Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Williams, Mary Juanita Petal, Miss. Junior 

Williams, Mrs. Mattie W Pinola, Miss. Senior 

Williams, Maxine . Smithville, Miss. Soph. 

Williams, Mrs. May Quinn Ruth, Miss. Fresh. 

Williams, Nell Vaiden, Miss. .—Junior 



Williams, Ollie P 

Williamson, Wiley Lee 

Williamson, Mrs. Willie Mae. 

Wilkinson, Mrs. J. A. 

Willingham, Golden F 

Willis, Annie Lee 

Willoughby, Eleanor E. 

Willoughby, James E. 



.Newton, Miss. Soph. 

.Collins, Miss. Fresh. 

.Weathersby, Miss. Special 

.Pascagoula, Miss. Junior 

.Beaumont, Miss. Soph. 

.Decatur, Miss. Junior 

.Jayess, Miss. Junior 

.Carson, Miss. Junior 



Wilson, Mrs. Cammie W. Ocean Springs, Miss. Soph. 

Wilson, Caroline A Jackson, Miss. Senior 

Wilson, Mrs. Flora L Seminary, Miss. * Senior 

Wilson, Frank R Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Wilson, Gloria June a — —Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Wilson, Helen E Summit, Miss. Junior 

Wilson, Ida Fern Gulfport, Miss. Senior 

Wilson, Jewell Seminary, Miss. Soph. 

Wilson, Sam Laurel, Miss. Fresh. 

Wiltshire, Mary Evelyn Magnolia, Miss. Senior 

Wilson, Mrs. Leila C , McComb, Miss. Soph. 

Swan, Hubert L J __ Lumberton, Miss. Senior 

Taconi, Opal F Biloxi, Miss. Senior 



190 



Register for 1946-47 



Talbert, H. G Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Talley, Norma Lee M Morgantown, Miss. Soph. 

Tally, Pauline Louin, Miss. Senior 

Tannehill, Richard W Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Tanner, Aubrey L Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Tanner, Mrs. James A Flora, Miss. Senior 

Tanner, Mary Lewis Laurel, Miss. .Senior 

Tanner, Reet G Laurel, Miss. Fresh. 

Tate, Mrs. N. M York, Ala. Special 

Tatum, Evelyn Louise Walnut Grove, Miss. Soph. 

Tatum, Sarah Elizabeth , Hattiesburg, Miss. Post Grad. 

Taylor, Berdelle Laurel, Miss. Senior 

Taylor, C. J New Orleans, La. Senior 

Taylor, Carolyn Margaret Union, Miss. Junior 

Taylor, Lillian E Decatur, Miss. Senior 

Taylor, Margaret Gene Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Taylor, Nora S Meridian, Miss. Fresh. 

Taylor, Pauline — Harrisville, Miss. Junior 

Taylor, Ray A Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Taylor, Richard L Purvis, Miss. Fresh. 

Taylor, Robert A., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Taylor, Mrs. Ruth N'adine Union, Miss. Senior 

Taylor, William N Laurel, Miss. Junior 

Tedder, Mrs. T. H Meridian, Miss. Post Grad. 

Tedder, Thomas H Meridian, Miss. Senior 

Temple, Idelle * Meadville, Miss. Soph. 

Terranova, Anthony J., Jr. New Orleans, La. Fresh. 

Terrell, Milton D Hattiesburg, Miss. . Soph. 

Terry, Willis Meridian, Miss. _■_ Senior 

Teston, Harvey A Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Tew, George T Jackson, Miss. Fresh. 

Thames, Richard H , Jackson, Miss. Senior 

Thames, Mrs. Ina C Duffee, Miss. Senior 

Thetford, Robert L Union Church, Miss. Senior 

Thigpen, Doc Picayune, Miss. Soph. 

Thigpen, Mrs. W. J. Picayune, Miss. Fresh. 

Thistle, Morgan E Long Beach, Miss. Soph. 

Thomas, Ann C ., Macon, Miss. Soph. 

Thomas, Charles A Picayune, Miss. Soph. 

Thomas, Grace L Walnut Grove, Miss. Senior 

Thomas, Jack Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Thomas, John David Quitman, Miss. Fresh. 

Thomas, Laura L. Pulaski, Miss. Junior 

Thomas, Marinee Stoner, Miss. Senior 

Thomas, Martin L . Grand Rapids, Mich. Fresh. 

Thompson, Bobbie Louise D'Lo, Miss. Senior 

Thompson, Branscomb, D Okolona, Miss. Soph. 

Thompson, David J., Jr. Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Thompson, George K Taylorsville, Miss. Soph. 

Thompson, Mrs. Homa Collins, Miss. Soph. 

Thompson, Jacqueline D'Lo, Miss. -_ Senior 

Thompson, Joyce , — Meridian, Miss. Fresh. 

Thompson, Mary Ruth Columbia, Miss. Junior 

Thompson, Ruby Grey Okolona, Miss. Junior 

Thompson, Mrs. W. C Newhebron, Miss. Soph. 

Thomsen, Mrs. Dorothy G Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Thorns, Mrs. David Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 



191 



Register for 1946-47 



Thorns, Ettie .Lee Richton, Miss. Soph. 

Thorn, Lucille * Terry, Miss. Senior 

Thornhill, Addie Bell Sumrall, Miss. Soph. 

Thornhill, Dwight Sandy Hook, Miss. Fresh. 

Thornhill, William D., Jr Summit, Miss. Fresh. 

Thornton, Dee Elizabeth Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Thornton, Harris K Pascagoula, Miss. Junior 

Thrash, Bessie B Hattiesburg, Miss. Post Grad. 

Thrash, Bessie Louise Hattiesburg, Miss. Post Grad. 

Thrash, Marie C Decatur, Miss. Junior 

Thurston, Eric L Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Tilghman, William F. — Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Tillman, Robert R Hazlehurst, Miss. Fresh. 

Timbes, Mrs. R. A Verona, Miss. ... . Junior 

Timbes, Corinne Paden, Miss. Senior 

Tisdale, Peggy Ann Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Tisdale, William F .Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Todd, Mary ____ Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Tokmenko, Michael Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Tolar, Henry G., Jr Moselle, Miss. Soph. 

Tolar, Otis L Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Tolbert, William H Biloxi, Miss. ....Senior 

Tomlin, Leo V. Union, Miss. Junior 

Toney, Ras Lee .^— ...,Shubuta, Miss. Fresh. 

Tootle, Iron R Ocean Springs, Miss. Senior 

Torgersen, Harold A. Waveland, Miss. Fresh. 

Townsend, Frances Kilmichael, Miss. Senior 

Townsend, Myra Jean Lena, Miss. Soph. 

Townsend, Vera Eugenia .'Lena, Miss. Senior 

Tracy, Mrs. J. C. ^—Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Tracy, Justus C Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Trevilion, Mrs. Hollye Ellisville, Miss. Post Grad. 

Trigg, Erastus Seminary, Miss. Fresh. 

Trigg, Nelda Marie Clara, Miss. Senior 

Trigg, Thomas K. Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Trim, Erma E +— Hermanville, Miss. Junior 

Triplet, Calvin R Picayune, Miss. Soph. 

Trotter, Barbara Ann Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Trussell, Tommy Love Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Tudury, Theodore A Bay St. Louis, Miss. Fresh. 

Turcotte, Cecile E Waveland, Miss. Senior 

Turcotte, Mary Margaret Waveland, Miss. Junior 

Turman, Dallas B .Tupelo, Miss. Junior 

Turnage, Maude R.... ^-— .Seminary, Miss. Junior 

Turner, Alpha N Leakesville, Miss. ■__ Fresh. 

Turner, Dorothy E Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Turner, Mrs. Evie Ruth D. Leakesville, Miss. Senior 

Turner, Gamaliel E. Richton, Miss. Fresh. 

Turner, Glenn W . Richton, Miss. Soph. 

Turner, Harry L. Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Turner, Harry Smith Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Turner, Jex J __ Waynesboro, Miss. Fresh. 

Turner, Joe, Jr . Columbia, Miss. Junior 

Turner, John M Philadelphia, Miss. Senior 

Turner, Martha Virginia Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Turner, Philip R Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Turner, Virginia F .Leakesville, Miss. — Fresh. 



192 



Register for 1946-47 



Turner, Wallace W Leakesville, Miss. Soph. 

Turnipseed, Edgar N Grenada, Miss. Soph. 

Tyler, Joyce B Picayune, Miss. Special 

Tynes, Christine Jayess, Miss. Junior 

Tyson, Julian N Meridian, Miss. Senior 

Valentine, Myrtis Alene Laurel, Miss. Senior 

Valentine, Ruth Newton, Miss. Junior 

Vance, Bert Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

VanPatten, James J Rose, N. Y. Soph. 

Varnado, Grayson H., Jr Columbia, Miss. Fresh. 

Vasquez, Ricardo Alberto New Orleans, La. Fresh. 

Ventrano, Joseph G Neptune, N. J. Junior 

Vice, Mrs. Maggie Pascagoula, Miss. Soph. 

Vierling, William L Biloxi, Miss. Junior 

Vinson, Lena Louise J — Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Vinson, Robert B Magee, Miss. * Fresh. 

VonWindeguth, Donald L Jacksonville, Fla. Fresh. 

Wade, Max Calhoun City, Miss Senior 

Waites, Fred Billingsley, Ala. Soph. 

Waits, Charles E Sumrall, Miss. Junior 

Wales, Mrs. Wessie Brookhaven, Miss. Special 

Walker, Agnes S * McLaurin, Miss. Soph. 

Walker, Albert T McLaurin, Mass. Junior 

Walker, Bonnie Jean Magee, Miss. Soph. 

Walker, Mrs. Carl Brookhaven, Miss. Junior 

Walker, Cora Belle Pascagoula, Miss. Post Grad. 

Walker, Elizabeth Nanette Drew, Miss. * Soph. 

Walker, Elmo L Belzoni, Miss. Senior 

Walker, George S. * Meridian, Miss. Soph. 

Walker, James F Kaufman, Texas Fresh. 

Walker, James M Collins, Miss. Soph. 

Walker, Jimmie Nell Hattiesburg, Miss. Post Grad. 

Walker, LaVert, Mendenhall, Miss. Senior 



Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 



Mrs. A. P., Jr Monticello, Miss. Soph. 

Arthur V., Jr Pascagoula, Miss. Junior 

Aubrey G Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Augusta H Wesson, Miss. Senior 

Betty Nell Gloster, Miss. Fresh. 

Bobbye Nell -McComb, Miss. Junior 

Carl Kerrville, Tex. Soph. 

Mrs. Cecile A Waynesboro, Miss. Senior 

Corbet N _>.— Tylertown, Miss. Senior 

Mrs. Corbet N. Tylertown, Miss. Junior 

Donis Lorraine Brookhaven, Miss. __*__ Junior 

Dorothy Jean Laurel, Miss. Junior 

Edna Earle Leakesville, Miss. Soph. 

Edward A Jackson, Miss. Fresh. 

Elba Catherine Raleigh, Miss. Fresh. 

Emmett M -Picayune, Miss. Fresh. 

Ernestine Poplarville, Miss. Junior 

Fannie Mae Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Mrs. Floy B Brookhaven, Miss. Special 

Gaulden L Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

George S McComb, Miss. Fresh. 

Howard H Philadelphia, Miss. *___ Soph. 

Ida Kate .-....-Collins, Miss. Fresh. 

Ida Mae Gulfport, Miss. Post Grad. 

193 



Register for 1946-47 



Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 



Mrs. Virgil Brookhaven, Miss. Senior 

Jackson Poplarville, Miss. Senior 

James E Florence, Miss. Soph. 

James Garland _.— Brookhaven, Miss. Special 

James M Richton, Miss. Soph. 

James W _ Columbia, Miss. Soph. 

Jessie Mae Poplarville, Miss. Junior 

John B Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

John N Hattiesburg, Miss. —.Junior 

Joyce June Pensacola, Fla. Fresh. 

Mrs. Julia K Lucien, Miss. Senior 

Lavada Auburn, Miss. Senior 

Lois j Brookhaven, Miss. Junior 



Lois Cecile 

Lois Lee 

Lola M 

Mrs. Lonnie 

Mabel K 

Manarah L 

Marlene 

Mary Cleo 

Mary Helen 

Mary Landrum 

Mrs. Mary Pigott. 

Milton B 

Nancy May 

Newton D., Jr. 



Leakesville, Miss. Junior 

Wiggins, Miss. Fresh. 

McComb, Miss. Junior 

Poplarville, Miss. Soph. 

..Picayune, Miss. ... . Soph. 

Prentiss, Miss. Junior 

Union, Miss. Junior 

Lucien, Miss. Senior 

Tylertown, Miss. Fresh. 

Crosby, Miss. Soph. 

McComb, Miss. Junior 

Gulfport, Miss. Junior 

.Collins, Miss. Fresh. 

.Purvis, Miss. Soph. 



Pearl Bankston Waynesboro, Miss. Junior 

Phillip B Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Mrs. Prentiss Brookhaven, Miss. Senior 

Rayburn E Lucedale, Miss. Fresh. 

Robert N Agricola, Miss. —Fresh. 

Robert Tupelo, Miss. Soph. 

Roy A Mart, Texas Fresh. 

Mrs. Roy D. Wesson, Miss. Junior 

Mrs. Ruth Mae Prentiss, Miss. Soph. 

Samuel Leakesville, Miss. Fresh. 

Tessa A Meridian, Miss. Senior 

Vaudie T ^-Poplarville, Miss. Soph. 

Walton F . Little Rock, Miss. Fresh. 

Willa Lee Tylertown, Miss. Junior 

William C Bassfield, Miss. Soph. 

William J Brookhaven, Miss. Senior 

Smithie, Mrs. C. R. Jayess, Miss. Junior 

Smylie, Mrs. J. P j Roxie, Miss. Junior 

Snell, Reese H Bonita, Miss. Fresh. 



Snowden, Marshall A.. 
Snowden, Mary Grace. 
Soderman, James W._ 

Sowell, Hubert M 

Sones, Doris Rae 

Sones, Mrs. John W. 



Sumrall, Miss. Post Grad. 

Sumrall, Miss. Senior 

Gulfport, Miss. ___* Fresh. 

Leakesville, Miss. Fresh. 



, Carriere, Miss. Junior 

Carriere, Miss. Junior 

Sorey, Eleanor Katherine Forest, Miss. Senior 

Sorey, Honor Forest, Miss. Senior 

Sorrels, Mrs. Ernestine P Gloster, Miss. Senior 

Sparks, Helen Grace Hillsboro, Miss. Senior 



Spence, Harold W. 
Spencer, Mrs. Clemma. 



Tylertown, Miss. Soph. 

Soso, Miss. Senior 



194 



Register for 1946-47 



Spencer, James L Natchez, Miss. * Fresh. 

Spencer, Roger P Slate Spring, Miss. Fresh. 

Spencer, Thomas, E., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Spinks, Samuel L., Jr Bogalusa, La. Junior 

Spotorno, Carmelite Bay St. Louis, Miss. Post Grad. 

Spruell, William L Moss Point, Miss. Fresh. 

Spruill, Mary Grace Sharon, Miss. Senior 

Stampley, Walter L Natchez, Miss. Soph. 

Stancil, Mrs. Mable L Auburn, Miss. Senior 

Stanley, James B Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Steadman, Elizabeth Claire Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Steele, Willia Jean j__ Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Stephens, Edna Helen Magee, Miss. Soph. 

Stephenson, Mrs. Laura W West Enterprise, Miss. Senior 

Stevens, Mrs. C. W Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

Stevens, George H Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Stevens, Harold W Gulf port, Miss. ^ Junior 

Stevens, John W Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Stevens, Richard G ___Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Stevens, Robert E Hazlehurst, Miss. Soph. 

Stevens, Vera Mae Braxton, Miss. Junior 

Stewart, Annette Lumberton, Miss. Senior 

Stewart, Ariel Biloxi, Miss. Junior 

Stewart, Mrs. G. E Collins, Miss. Soph. 

Stewart, George L., Jr. J _ Harperville, Miss. Soph. 

Stewart, Iva Wiggins, Miss. Soph. 

Stewart, Mrs. Jack Marie Gulf port, Miss. Junior 

Stewart, Mrs. James E. Poplarville, Miss. Senior 

Stewart, Mildred E Poplarville, Miss. Soph. 

Stewart, 0. Walton Collins, Miss. Soph. 

Stewart, Mrs. P. H Picayune, Miss. Post Grad. 

Stewart, Raymond D ., Collins, Miss. Fresh. 

Stewart, Ruby F Picayune, Miss. Junior 

Stewart, Varna Idelle Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Stewart, William H Poplarville, Miss. Senior 

Stockstill, Eugene H Hattiesburg, Miss. Special 

Stockstill, Lena Mae Bay St. Louis, Miss. Junior 

Stolpe, Mrs. Edwin Bogue Chitto, Miss. Post Grad. 

Stone, Althea Z.___ Purvis, Miss. Senior 

Stone, H. P., Jr Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Stone, Richard M Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Street, Willie May McComb, Miss. Senior 

Streiff, Richard F Gulfport, Miss. Junior 

Stribling, Frederick K Florence, Miss. Fresh. 

Strickland, James C Atmore, Ala. Fresh. 

Stringer, Jane Margaret — — Summerland, Miss. Soph. 

Stringer, Kathryn Lois Meridian, Miss. Soph. 

Stringfellow, Joe E Meridian, Miss. Senior 

Strother, Eunice Fay Mississippi City, Miss. ____ -Senior 

Strother, George E., Jr Mississippi City, Mis.s Fresh. 

Strong, Ernest C Greenwood, Miss. Fresh. 

Stuard, Hilton J Magee, Miss. Soph. 

Stuart, Lemmie M Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Stuart, Roger G Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Stubbs, James C Magee, Miss. Fresh. 

Sturdivant, Mrs. Louise Dekalb, Miss. Junior 

Sturdivant, Ottis W Scooba, Miss. __ Junior 

Stullivan, Daniel E Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 



195 



Register for 1948-47 



Sullivan, Maxie C Mize, Miss. Senior 

Sullivan, R. G Sanford, Miss. Senior 

Sullivan, Robert M Hattiesburg, Miss. Senior 

Sumrall, Henry R Sumrall, Miss. Fresh. 

Sumrall, Mrs. I. B Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Sumrall, Mrs. L. F Richton, Miss. Soph. 

Sutherlin, Mary Virginia Heidelberg, Miss. Fresh. 

Swan, Aubrey E Purvis, Miss. _- . Soph. 

Swan, Catherine Joyce Laurel, Miss. Soph. 

Wilson, Mrs. Mary K Lucien, Miss. _.Fresh. 

Wilson, Pauline Crystal Springs, Miss. Special 

Wilson, Stella Belle Gulfport, Miss. Senior 

Wilson, Mrs. Woodrow Lyman, Miss. Senior 

Wing, Mrs. Nellie R Liberty, Miss. Soph. 

Winstead, Helen Grace Carson, Miss. Senior 

Winstead, Howard D Jackson, Miss. Soph. 

Winstead, Lonnie Agnes ^ Carson, Miss. Senior 

Winstead, Mrs. V. P Morton, Miss. Soph. 

Winstead, Willie Benjamin Pass Christian, Miss. Soph. 

Wise, Edward H Delhi, La. Fresh. 

Wise, Stancil —.Natchez, Miss. Soph. 

Wolf, Larry B Columbia, Miss. Junior 

Womack, Bruce B. Bogalusa, La. Soph. 

Wood, Betty Lyn ., Woodville, Miss. Soph. 

Wood, Charles Ben, Jr. Hazlehurst, Miss. Fresh. 

Wood, James Y Franklinton, La. Soph. 

Wood, Katherine Eupora, Miss. Junior 

Wood, Lucy M Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Woodham, Robert C Brooklyn, Miss. Senior 

Word, Martha Lucille.— ~ Pascagoula, Miss. Junior 

Wooton, Richard G Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

Wright, Dollye Mae Centreville, Miss. Junior 

Wright, James B Water Valley, Miss. Fresh. 

Wright, Jesse F Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

Wright, John H., Jr Lucedale, Miss. Soph. 

Wright, Mary Belle Centreville, Miss. Soph. 

Wright, Mrs. Pauline Dallas Collinsville, Miss. Senior 



Wright, Thomas Lundy. 

Wright, Walter Louis 

Wright, Windham F. 

Wroten, Evelyn. 



Wylie, Mrs. Stella G.- 
Yates, Fred C, Jr 

Yates, George William. 

Yeager, Clifton D 

Yeager, Harmon 

Young, Clayton- 



Young, Dorothy May. 

Young, Frank, Jr 

Young, Glenn G 

Young, Henry C.- 
Young, Jim Ross. 



Young, Mrs. Minerva H. 

Young, Mrs. O. E 

Youngblood, Frances E. 

Youngblood, Julia A. 

Zehnder, Louis S., Jr. 

Zengarling, Mrs. Ethel S... 



.Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

.Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

.Plantersville, Miss. Fresh. 

.Meadville, Miss. Soph. 

.Picayune, Miss. Soph. 

.Mt O.live, Miss. Fresh. 

.Mt. Olive, Miss. Soph. 

.Wiggins, Miss. Soph. 

.Hattiesburg, Miss. Fresh. 

.Neshoba, Miss. Soph. 

-Morganza, La. ^.~ Special 

-Hazlehurst, Miss. Fresh. 

.Hattiesburg, Miss. Junior 

.Neshoba, Miss. Soph. 

-Carthage, Miss. Fresh. 

Brookhaven, Miss. Soph. 

—Smithdale, Miss. Junior 

Meadville, Miss. Senior 

—Meadville, Miss. Senior 

—Hattiesburg, Miss. Soph. 

....Bay St. Louis, Miss. Junior 

196 



Index 



INDEX 



Absences 71 

Academic Guidance 67 

Accounting 82 

Administration Building ___ 21 

Administrative Officers — — 9 

Administration of Schools 92 

Admission 46 

Admission to Graduate 

Division J -~ 38 

Advanced Standing 47 

Alpha Mu Chi 23 

Alumni Association 27 

Alumni News 26 

American Legion 25 

Anatomy 77 

Apartments 28 

Art 114, 115, 116 

Auditorium 21 



Bachelor of Arts Degree 64 

Bachelor's Degree, second,. 70 

Bachelor of Music Degree,. 64 

Bachelor of Science Degree 48 

Band 26 

Best Citizens Awards 27 

Biological Sciences 73 

Biology 74 

Board 42 

Board of Trustees ....^— 5 

Botany 76 

Buildings 21 

Business Administration, — . 80 

Business Education 78 

Business Regulations 45 



Calendar 6, 7, 8, 70 

Certificates to Teach 65, 66 

Chapel Attendance 71 

Chemistry 136 

Child Development 125 

Choral Union 26 

Church Music 98, 105, 112 

Clef Club 24 

Clothing 123 

College Annual 26 

College Hall 21 

College Newspaper 25 

Commerce 77 

Commerce Club 24 

Composition 97, 101 

Core Curricula 46 

Correspondence Study 34 



Correspondence Work in 

Residence 70 

Cost 42 

Course Numbers 72 

Courses Offered by 

Correspondence — 37 

Credit for Military 

Experience 47 

Definitions 72 

Degrees 48, 148 

Degrees for Pre-law 

Students 64 

Degrees for Pre-medical 

Students 64 

Demonstration School 29 

Demonstration School 

Gymnasium 21 

Dining Hall 22 

Divisions ....-— 46 

Biological Sciences .... 73- 77 

Commerce 77- 86 

Education and 

Psychology 86- 94 

Fine Arts 95-116 

Health and Physical 

Education 117-120 

Home Economics 121-126 

Industrial Arts 127 

Language and 

Literature 128-135 

Physical Sciences and 

Mathematics 136-139 

Social Studies 139-146 

Dramatics Club 25 

Economics 84 

Education and Psychology „ 86 

Elementary Council 23 

Elementary Curriculum 48 

Elementary Education. 86 

Employment _, — ! 26 

English 128-133 

Enrollment 147 

Ensemble 109 

Examinations 71 

Exemption from Core 

Requirements 68 

Expenses „ 42 

Extension Class Study 33 

Extension Offerings 33 

Faculty 10-17 



197 



Index 



Faculty Committees 19 

Family 125 

Fine Arts 95 

Foods and Nutrition — - 124 

Forrest County Hall 21 

Fraternities 25 

French 134 

Future Teachers of 

America 25 

General Calendar 6, 7, 8 

General Educational 

Development Test 47 

Geography 139 

German „-—__. . 133 

Government 143 

Grading System 72 

Graduate Assistants 18 

Graduate Division 38 

Greek 135 

Guidance 67 

Harp ......98, 106, 108 

Hattiesburg Choral Union__ 26 
Hattiesburg Concert 

Association 26 

Hattiesburg Hall 21 

Heads of Divisions 9 

Health 117 

High School Curriculum 50 

Historical - 20 

History 141 

History of Music 109 

Home Economics Building _. 21 

Home Economics Club 23 

Home Economics Education 126 

Home Management 125 

Home Management Houses 30 

Honors 67 

Honor Roll 71 

Hospital 22 

Hospital Technician 67 

Industrial Arts 127 

Instrumental 

Supervisor's .... 103, 104 

International Relations 

Club 124 

Intra Americas Institute— ... 32 
Intramural Athletics 26 

Joe Cook Memorial Library 28 
Journalism . 130, 131 



Laboratory Fees 43, 44 

Laboratory School 29 

Language and Literature _. 128 

Late Registrations 70 

Library 28 

Library Science 131 

Living Accommodations 28 

Load of Work 71 

M Club 24 

McClesky Hall 22 

McMillin Hall 22 

Marketing and 

Merchandising 84 

Master's Degree 39 

Mathematics 138 

Memorandum of Credits 72 

Merchandising 84 

Ministerial League 23 

Mississippi Hall 22 

Modern Language Club 23 

Music Education Major 102, 110 
Music Fees 43, 44 



Nature Study 77 

Newspaper 25 

Nursery School ...^— 29 

Nutrition 124 



Ole Southern Club 24 

Organization of 

Instruction 46 



P. E. M. Club 23 

Physical Education 68, 119, 120 

Physical Examinations 47 

Physical Sciences 136 

Physics 137 

Physiology 77 

Piano 96, 98, 107, 113 

Placement Bureau 29 

Placement Examinations .... 47 

Political Science 143 

Power House 22 

Practical Music 112, 113 

Pre-Dental Curricula 66 

Pre-Engineering Curricula 67 

Pre-Med Club 24 

Pre-Medical Curricula 66 

Pre-Pharmacy Curricula ____ 67 
Pre-Professional Curricula 66 

Program Changes 70 

Program of Work —- - 68 

Psychology 93 



198 



Index 



Quality Requirements 69 

Quarter Hours for Degree .. 68 

Reading Clinic 31 

Recitals 107 

Register 148-196 

Religious Education 145 

Religious Organizations 23 

Residence Attendance 68 

Requirements for 

Admission ,.—_._. 46 

Room Reservations 28 

S Courses 72 

Sanitarians 58 

Scholarships 27 

Scholarships for 

Graduate Students 41 

Scholarship Standards 69 

Scholastic Regulations 68 

School Music 110 

Science Hall .__..- 21 

Secondary Education 90 

Secretarial Studies 55 

Social Studies 139 

Sociology 144 

Sociology Club 25 

Sororities 25 

Southerner * 26 

Spanish 135 

Speech 132 

Staff Members 18 



Student Employment 26 

Student Government 23 

Student Printz 25 

Student Teaching in 

Homemaking 30 

Swimming Pool 22 

Textiles 123 

Theoretical Music 108, 113 

Trailers 28 

Trustees 5 



Vesper Choir 26 

Vespers - 23 

Veteran's Club 24 

Veteran's Lounge 26 

Veterans of Foreign Wars.. 25 

Violin 96, 99, 107 

Violincello 97, 100, 107 

Voice 96, 100, 107, 113 

Weathersby Hall 22 

Wimpy's 26 

Woodwork ___. 127 

Workshop Program 31 

X Courses 72 



Zoology 75 



GEIGER PRINTING CO., HATTIESBURG